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  1. Poetic realism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poetic_realism

    Poetic realism was a film movement in France of the 1930s. More a tendency than a movement, poetic realism is not strongly unified like Soviet montage or French Impressionism but were individuals who created this lyrical style.

  2. Literary realism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Literary_realism

    Literary realism is a literary genre, part of the broader realism in arts, that attempts to represent subject-matter truthfully, avoiding speculative fiction and supernatural elements. It originated with the realist art movement that began with mid- nineteenth-century French literature ( Stendhal ), and Russian literature ( Alexander Pushkin ). [1]

  3. Realism (arts) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Realism_(arts)

    Realism has been prevalent in the arts at many periods, and can be in large part a matter of technique and training, and the avoidance of stylization. In the visual arts, illusionistic realism is the accurate depiction of lifeforms, perspective, and the details of light and colour. But realist or naturalist works of art may, as well or instead ...

  4. Talk:Poetic realism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Poetic_realism

    Unbalanced. Poetic realism was not only a film movement but a general art movement.. --Eleassar my talk 12:39, 8 April 2008 (UTC) This observation is hard to justify though. German Expressionist paintings can be seen to be visually similar to Expressionist films, most notably 'The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari' (Weine 1920), and so it is reasonable to include Expressionist films as one part of the ...

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  6. Realism (art movement) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Realism_(art_movement)

    Realism was an artistic movement that emerged in France in the 1840s, around the 1848 Revolution. Realists rejected Romanticism, which had dominated French literature and art since the early 19th century. Realism revolted against the exotic subject matter and the exaggerated emotionalism and drama of the Romantic movement.

  7. Where Does Poetic Realism Fit in to Film Noir? - Film Noir

    www.classicfilmnoir.com/2014/12/poetic-realism...

    For once, let's not got to WIKIPEDIA. Instead, I'll try and call this one in pictures of Jean Gabin. The story goes that when film noir surfaced in America in the early 1940s, it was the product of a mixing of current American themes with two stylistic strands from Europe, the first being German Expressionism and the second being Poetic Realism.

  8. poetic realism : definition of poetic realism and synonyms of ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/poetic realism/en-en

    Poetic realism was a film movement in France of the 1930s and through the war years.More a tendency than a movement, Poetic Realism is not strongly unified like Soviet Montage or French Impressionism but were individuals who created this lyrical style.

  9. The Big Picture (book) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poetic_naturalism

    Poetic naturalism. Carroll terms his overall philosophical approach poetic naturalism, aiming by this term to suggest a type of naturalism which encourages a variety of ways to talk about the world, using language dependent upon the aspect of reality being discussed. Poetic naturalism acknowledges that the methods and terms used within one ...

  10. Magic realism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_realism

    Criticism that Latin America is the birthplace and cornerstone of all things magic realist is quite common. Ángel Flores does not deny that magical realism is an international commodity but articulates that it has a Hispanic birthplace, writing that "Magical realism is a continuation of the romantic realist tradition of Spanish language literature and its European counterparts."

  11. Metonymy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metonymy

    Here are some broad kinds of relationships where metonymy is frequently used: Containment: When one thing contains another, it can frequently be used metonymically, as when "dish" is used to refer not to a plate but to the food it contains, or as when the name of a building is used to refer to the entity it contains, as when "the White House" or "The Pentagon" are used to refer to the U.S ...