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  1. Rabbinic Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbinic_Judaism

    Rabbinic Judaism is distinguished by belief in Moses as "our Rabbi" and that God revealed the Torah in two parts, as both the Written and the Oral Torah, also known as the Mishnah. All the laws in the Written Torah are recorded only as part of a narrative describing God imparting these laws to Moses and commanding him to transmit them to the ...

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  3. Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judaism

    Conservative Judaism is characterized by a commitment to traditional Jewish laws and customs, including observance of Shabbat and kashrut, a deliberately non-fundamentalist teaching of Jewish principles of faith, a positive attitude toward modern culture, and an acceptance of both traditional rabbinic and modern scholarship when considering ...

  4. Rabbi - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbi

    A rabbi is a spiritual leader or religious teacher in Judaism. One becomes a rabbi by being ordained by another rabbi, following a course of study of Jewish texts such as the Talmud. The basic form of the rabbi developed in the Pharisaic and Talmudic era, when learned teachers assembled to codify Judaism's written and oral laws. The title ...

  5. Rabbinic Judaism : definition of Rabbinic Judaism and ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/Rabbinic Judaism/en-en
    • Background
    • Written and Oral Law
    • Development of Rabbinic Judaism
    • Modern Developments
    • See Also

    In keeping with the commandments of the Torah, Judaism had centered tightly on religious practice and sacrifices at the Temple in Jerusalem. However, after the destruction of the Temple, Jews were deprived of a central place of worship and religious activity and were unable to fulfill the Temple-related practices mandated in the Tanakh, and were scattered around the world.

    The feature that distinguishes Rabbinic Judaism is the emphasis placed on the Oral Law or Oral Torah. The authority for that position has been the insistence by the Rabbis that the oral law was transmitted to Moses at Mount Sinai at the same time as the Written Law — the Torah — and that the oral law has been transmitted from generation to generation since. The Talmud is said to be a codification of the oral law, and is thereby just as binding as the Torah itself. As an example, in Exodus 18 and Numbers 11 of the Bibleis cited to show that Moses appointed elders to govern with him and to judge disputes, imparting to them details and guidance of how to interpret the revelations from God while carrying out their duties.

    As the Rabbis were required to face a new reality—mainly Judaism without a Temple (to serve as the center of teaching and study) and Judea without autonomy—there was a flurry of legal discourse and the old system of oral scholarship could not be maintained. It is during this period that Rabbinic discourse began to be recorded in writing.[1] The theory that the destruction of the Temple and subsequent upheaval led to the committing of Oral Law into writing was first explained in the Epistle of Sherira Gaon and often repeated.[2] The oral law was subsequently codified in the Mishnah and Gemara, and is interpreted in Rabbinic literature detailing subsequent rabbinic decisions and writings. Rabbinic Jewish literature is predicated on the belief that the Torah cannot be properly understood without recourse to the Oral Law. Indeed, it states that many commandments and stipulations contained in the Torah would be difficult, if not impossible, to keep without the Oral Law to define them — f...

    Until the Jewish enlightenment of the late 18th century, and the resulting division of Ashkenazi Jewry into religious movements or denominations, especially in North America and anglophone countries, halakha had the universal status of required religious practice. This remains the prevailing position among Orthodox and Conservative Jews. Reform Jewsdo not generally treat halakha as binding.

  6. Rabbinic Jews also believe that there is another part of the Torah besides the five books of Moses. It is called the Mishnah , also called the Oral Torah or Oral Law. It explains how to follow the laws written in the 5 books.

  7. Rabbinic literature - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbinic_literature

    Rabbinic literature, in its broadest sense, can mean the entire spectrum of rabbinic writings throughout Jewish history. However, the term often refers specifically to literature from the Talmudic era, as opposed to medieval and modern rabbinic writing, and thus corresponds with the Hebrew term Sifrut Chazal (Hebrew: ספרות חז״ל ‎ "Literature [of our] sages," where Hazal normally ...

  8. Messianic Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messianic_Judaism

    Association by a Jewish politician with a Messianic rabbi, inviting him to pray at a public meeting, even though made in error, resulted in nearly universal condemnation by Jewish congregations in Detroit in 2018, as the majority opinion in both Israeli and American Jewish circles is to consider Messianic Judaism as Christianity and its ...

  9. Hasidic Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hasidic_Judaism

    The rabbi of Rimanov hearkened the alliance the hasidim would form with the most conservative elements of the Jewish public. In Central Poland, the new leader was Jacob Isaac Horowiz, the " Seer of Lublin ", who was of a particularly populist bent and appealed to the common folk with miracle working and little strenuous spiritual demands.

  10. Guardian angel - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guardian_angel

    In Judaic rabbinic literature through modern Judaism Rabbinic literature. In Rabbinic literature, the Rabbis expressed the notion that there are indeed guardian angels appointed by God to watch over people.