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  1. 1793 Philadelphia yellow fever epidemic - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Yellow_Fever_Epidemic_of_1793

    During the 1793 yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia, 5,000 or more people were listed in the official register of deaths between August 1 and November 9.The vast majority of them died of yellow fever, making the epidemic in the city of 50,000 people one of the most severe in United States history.

  2. Yellow fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Yellow_fever

    Yellow fever is caused by yellow fever virus, an enveloped RNA virus 40–50 nm in width, the type species and namesake of the family Flaviviridae. It was the first illness shown to be transmissible by filtered human serum and transmitted by mosquitoes, by American doctor Walter Reed around 1900.

  3. Deadly diseases: epidemics throughout history

    edition.cnn.com › interactive › 2014

    Philadelphia was struck with a yellow fever epidemic in 1793 that killed a 10th of the city's 45,000-person population. 1860 The Modern Plague began in the 1860s and killed more than 12 million ...

  4. Deadly diseases: epidemics throughout history

    www.cnn.com › interactive › 2014

    Philadelphia was struck with a yellow fever epidemic in 1793 that killed a 10th of the city's 45,000-person population. 1860 The Modern Plague began in the 1860s and killed more than 12 million ...

  5. How might climate change affect the spread of viruses?

    www.medicalnewstoday.com › articles › how-might

    Apr 03, 2020 · Between 1793 and 1905, there were nine devastating yellow fever epidemics. Seven coincided with a major El Niño episode. El Niño is a band of warm water that develops off the Pacific coast of ...

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