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  1. Coat of plates - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coat_of_plates

    A coat of plates is a form of segmented torso armour consisting of overlapping metal plates riveted inside a cloth or leather garment. The coat of plates is considered part of the era of transitional armour and was normally worn as part of a full knightly harness. The coat saw its introduction in Europe among the warring elite in the 1180s or 1220s and was well established by the 1250s. It was in very common usage by the 1290s. By the 1350s it was universal among infantry militias as well. After

    • Construction

      The plates number anywhere from eight or ten to the hundreds...

    • Visby armour

      One of the best resources about coats of plates are the mass...

    • Development

      The early coat of plates is often seen with trailing cloth...

  2. Coat of plates | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org/wiki/Coat_of_plates
    • Construction
    • Visby Armour
    • Terra Cotta Army
    • Development
    • See Also
    • References

    The plates number anywhere from eight or ten to the hundreds depending on their size. The plates overlap, usually only enough to guarantee full coverage even when moving around and fighting. The coat of plates is similar to several other armours such as lamellar, scale and brigandine. Unlike scale armour which has plates on the outside or splint armourin which plates can be inside or outside, a coat of plates has the plates on the inside of the foundation garment. It is generally distinguished from a brigandine by having larger plates, though there may be no distinction in some examples.

    One of the best resources about coats of plates are the mass graves from the Battle of Visby. The Visby coats of plates display between 8 and some 600 separate plates fastened to their backings.The mass grave from a battle in 1361 has yielded a tremendous number of intact armour finds including 24 distinct patterns of coat of plates style armour. Many of these were older styles similar to the armoured surcoat discussed below.

    Coat of plates armor (along with lamellar) is also seen among the terra cotta army- soldiers representative of the Qin Dynasty.

    The coat of plates likely developed from the armoured surcoat, such as seen on the 1250 St. Maurice coat. These consisted of metal plates rivetted to the inside of a surcoat. There is debate regarding whether the plates inside the armoured surcoat overlapped; but the armour is otherwise similar. This type of armour is also documented in Norse written sources from around 1250: the Konungs skuggsjá calls it a Briost Bjorg and specifies that is should cover the area between the nipples and the belt, and the later Hirdskraa of the 1270s calls it a Plata. The former source informs us that the armour should be worn beneath the hauberk, which can explain why this form of armour so seldom appears in illustrations and statuary before the late 13th century. This armor was improved in the 15th century, being altered to resemble a contemporary doublet. This version of the coat of plates, studded with rivets, was known as a brigandine. The name is derived from "brigand," the name for a common so...

    Edge, David; John Miles Paddock (1993) [1988]. Arms & Armor of the Medieval Knight (Crescent Books reprint ed.). New York: Crescent Books. ISBN 0-517-10319-2.
    Thordeman, Bengt (2001) [1939]. Armour from the Battle of Wisby, 1361 (The Chivalry Bookshelf reprint ed.). The Chivalry Bookshelf. ISBN 1-891448-05-6.
    Counts, David. "Examination of St. Maurice Coat of Plates", The Arador Armour Library, retrieved 3/22/07
  3. Chiton - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiton

    They are also sometimes known as sea cradles or "coat-of-mail shells", or more formally as loricates, polyplacophorans, and occasionally as polyplacophores. Chitons have a shell composed of eight separate shell plates or valves. These plates overlap slightly at the front and back edges, and yet articulate well with one another.

  4. Jack of plate - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_of_plate

    A jack of plate is a type of armour made up of small iron plates sewn between layers of felt and canvas. They were commonly referred to simply as a "jack" (although this could also refer to any outer garment).

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  6. Coat of plates - WikiMili, The Free Encyclopedia

    wikimili.com/en/Coat_of_plates

    Aug 30, 2019 · A coat of plates is a form of segmented torso armour consisting of overlapping metal plates riveted inside a cloth or leather garment. The coat of plates is considered part of the era of transitional armour and was normally worn as part of a full knightly harness.

  7. Brigandine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brigandine

    Medieval brigandines were essentially a refinement of the earlier coat of plates, which developed in the late 12th century, typically of simpler construction with larger metal plates. This armour of Asian origin reached Europe after the Mongol invasion in 1240 that destroyed the Kievan Rus' and severely damaged the Kingdom of Hungary in 1241.

  8. Sabaton - Wikipedia

    www.wikipedia.org/search-redirect.php?family=...

    These plates generally covered only the top of the foot. Some sources maintain that the broad-toed variant is the true sabaton, whereas the earlier versions should be referred to as a solleret. [2]

  9. Surcoat - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surcoat

    A surcoat or surcote initially was an outer garment commonly worn in the Middle Ages by both men and women in Western Europe. It can either refer to a coat worn over other clothes or the outermost garment itself. The name derives from French meaning "over the coat", a long, loose, often sleeveless coat reaching down to the feet.

  10. Jazerant - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jazerant

    Jazerant (Jaz´er`ant), or Hauberk jazerant, is a form of medieval light coat of armour consisting of mail between layers of fabric or leather. It was largely used in Turkey, the Middle East and Persia from the 11th and 12th century, at the end of the 13th and throughout the 14th century.

  11. Body armor - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Body_armor

    The coat of plates was developed, an armor made of large plates sewn inside a textile or leather coat. Early plate in Italy, and elsewhere in the 13th to 15th centuries were made of iron. Iron armor could be carburized or case hardened to give a surface of harder steel. [8]