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  1. Dutch language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_language

    Dutch (Nederlands (help · info)) is a West Germanic language spoken by about 24 million people as a first language and 5 million people as a second language, constituting the majority of people in the Netherlands (where it is the sole official language countrywide) and Belgium (as one of three official languages).

  2. Dutch (Dutch: Nederlands) is a West Germanic language. It comes from the Netherlands and is the country's official language . [4] It is also spoken in the northern half of Belgium (the region called Flanders ), and in the South American country of Suriname .

  3. Dutch Wikipedia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_Wikipedia

    The Dutch Wikipedia (Dutch: Nederlandstalige Wikipedia) is the Dutch-language edition of the free online encyclopedia, Wikipedia. It was started in June 2001. As of October 2020, the Dutch Wikipedia is the sixth-largest Wikipedia edition, with 2,036,711 articles.

    • Dutch Wikipedia community
    • Dutch
  4. History of the Dutch language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Dutch_language

    Dutch is a West Germanic language, that originated from the Old Frankish dialects.. Among the words with which Dutch has enriched the English vocabulary are: brandy, coleslaw, cookie, cruiser, dock, easel, freight, landscape, spook, stoop, and yacht.

  5. Dutch (Nederlands (help · info)) is a West Germanic language spoken by around 23 million people as a first language and 5 million people as a second language, constituting the majority of people in the Netherlands (where it is the sole official language) and Belgium (as one of three official languages).

  6. Category:Dutch language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Dutch_language

    Library cataloging and classification; main topic: Dutch: Dewey Decimal: 439.31 Library of Congress: PF1-979: Universal Decimal: 811.112.5

    • 439.31
    • 811.112.5
    • PF1-979
    • Dutch
  7. People also ask

    What country is the Dutch language spoken in?

    What is the official language of the Netherlands?

    What is the language spoken in Netherlands?

    Did the Dutch speak English?

    • Name
    • History
    • Dialects
    • Geographic Distribution
    • Phonology
    • Grammar
    • Vocabulary
    • Spelling and Writing System

    In both Belgium and the Netherlands, the native official name for Dutch is Nederlands. Sometimes Vlaams ("Flemish") is used as well to describe Standard Dutch in Flanders. Over time, the Dutch language has been known under a variety of names. In Middle Dutch Dietsc, Duutsc, or Duitsc was used. It derived from the Old Germanic word theudisk, which literally means "popular" or "belonging to the populace". In Western Europe this term was used for the language of the local Germanic populace as opposed to Latin, the non-native language of writing and the Catholic Church. In the first text in which it is found, dating from 784, theodisce refers to Anglo-Saxon, the West Germanic dialects of Britain. Although in Britain the name Englisc replaced theodisce early on, speakers of West Germanic in other parts of Europe continued to use theodisce to refer to their local speech. With the rise of local powers in the Low Countries during the Middle Ages, language names derived from these local poli...

    Old Dutch branched off more or less around the same time as Old English (Anglo-Saxon), Old High German, Old Frisian and Old Saxon did. The early form of Dutch was a set of Franconian dialects spoken by the Salian Franks in the fifth century, and thus, it has developed through Middle Dutch to Modern Dutch over the course of 15 centuries. During that period, it forced Old Frisian back from the western coast to the north of the Low Countries, and influenced or even replaced Old Saxon spoken in the east (contiguous with the Low German area). On the other hand, Dutch has been replaced in adjacent lands in present-day France and Germany. The division into Old, Middle and Modern Dutch is mostly conventional, since the transition between them was very gradual. One of the few moments when linguistscan detect something of a revolution is when the Dutch standard language emerged and quickly established itself. The development of the Dutch language is illustrated by the following sentence in Ol...

    Dutch dialects are primarily the dialects that are both related with the Dutch language and are spoken in the same language area as the Dutch standard language. Although heavily under the influence of the standard language, some of them remain remarkably diverse and are found in the Netherlands and northern Belgium. The areas in which they are spoken often correspond with former mediaeval counties and duchies. The Netherlands (but not Belgium) distinguishes between a dialect and a streektaal ("regional language"). Those words are actually more political than linguistic because a regional language unites a large group of very different varieties. Such is the case with the Gronings dialect, which is considered a variety of the Dutch Low Saxon regional language, but it is really very distinct from other Low Saxon varieties because of a Frisian substrate. Also, some Dutch dialects are more remote from the Dutch standard language than some varieties of a regional language are. Such is th...

    Dutch is an official language of the Netherlands proper, Belgium, Suriname, the Dutch Caribbean municipal (St. Eustatius Saba & Bonaire), Aruba, Curaçao and Sint Maarten. Dutch is also an official language of several international organisations, such as the European Union, Union of South American Nations and the Caribbean Community. At an academic level, Dutch is taught in about 175 universities in 40 countries. About 15,000 students worldwide study Dutch at university.

    For further details on different realisations of phonemes, dialectal differences and example words, see the full article at Dutch phonology.

    Dutch is grammatically similar to German, such as in syntax and verb morphology (for a comparison of verb morphology in English, Dutch and German, see Germanic weak verb and Germanic strong verb). Grammatical cases have largely fallen out of use and are now mostly limited to pronouns and a large number of set phrases. Inflected forms of the articles are also often found in surnames and toponyms. Standard Dutch uses three genders to differentiate between natural gender and three when discerning grammatical gender. But for most non-Belgian speakers, the masculine and feminine genders have merged to form the common gender (de), while the neuter (het) remains distinct as before. This gender system is similar to those of most Continental Scandinavian languages. As in English, but to a lesser degree, the inflectional grammar of the language (e.g., adjective and noun endings) has simplified over time.

    Dutch vocabulary is predominantly Germanic in origin, with loanwords accounting for 20%. The main foreign influence on Dutch vocabulary since the 12th century and culminating in the French period has been French and (northern) Oïl languages, accounting for an estimated 6.8% of all words, or more than a third of all loanwords. Latin, which was spoken in the southern Low Countries for centuries, and subsequently played a major role as the language of science and religion, follows with 6.1%. High German and Low German were influential until the mid-19th century and account for 2.7%, but these are mostly unrecognizable since many have been "Dutchified", e.g. German Fremdling → Dutch vreemdeling. Dutch has borrowed words from English since the middle of the 19th century, as a consequence of the increasing power and influence of Britain and the United States. The share of English loanwords is about 1.5%, but this number is still on the increase. Many English loans become less visible over...

    Dutch is written using the Latin script. Dutch uses one additional character beyond the standard alphabet, the digraph IJ. It has a relatively high proportion of doubled letters, both vowels and consonants, due to the formation of compound words and also to the spelling devices for distinguishing the many vowel sounds in the Dutch language. An example of five consecutive doubled letters is the word voorraaddoos (food storage container). The diaeresis (Dutch: trema) is used to mark vowels that are pronounced separately when involving a pre- or suffix, and a hyphen is used when the problem occurs in compound words. For example; "beïnvloed" (influenced), de zeeën (the seas) but zee-eend (scoter; litt: sea duck). Generally, other diacritical marks occur only in loanwords. However, the acute accent can also be used for emphasis or to differentiate between two forms, and its most common use is to differentiate between the indefinite article'een' /ən/ (a, an) and the numeral 'één' /e:n/ (o...

  8. Terminology of the Low Countries - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_for_the_Dutch_language

    At the time the language was spoken, it was known as *þiudisk, meaning "of the people"—as opposed to the Latin language "of the clergy"—which is the source of the English word Dutch. Now an international exception, it used to have in the Dutch language itself a cognate with the same meaning, i.e., Diets(c) or Duuts(c) .

  9. Dutch Language Union - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nederlandse_Taalunie

    The Dutch Language Union (Dutch: Nederlandse Taalunie (help · info), NTU) is an international regulatory institution that governs issues regarding the Dutch language.It is best known for its spelling reforms which are promulgated by member states, grammar books, the Green Booklet and its support of Dutch language courses and studies worldwide.

  10. Pennsylvania German language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennsylvania_Dutch_language

    Pennsylvania German (Deitsch, Pennsilfaanisch-Deitsch listen (help · info), Pennsilfaanisch), often called Pennsylvania Dutch, is a variety of West Central German spoken by the Old Order Amish, Old Order Mennonites and other descendants of German immigrants in the United States and Canada, closely related to the Palatine dialects.

    • 147,000 (2012-2016 American Community Survey), to 350,000 (2012) (L2 speakers: about 3,000)
    • United States, Canada
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