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  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › FingallianFingallian - Wikipedia

    Fingallian or the Fingal dialect is an extinct Anglic language formerly spoken in Fingal, Ireland. It is thought to have been an offshoot of Middle English, which was brought to Ireland during the Norman invasion, and was extinct by the mid-19th century. Although little is known of Fingallian, it is thought to have been similar to the Forth and ...

    • History
    • The Fingallian Dance
    • Purgatorium Hibernicum
    • Letters from Ireland
    • Modern Fingal English
    • See Also
    • Notes
    • External Links

    Fingallian was spoken in the region of Fingal, traditionally the part of County Dublin north of the River Tolka, and now a separate county. It was spoken in the area near the northern border. The name "Fingal" is from the Irish Fine Gall, or "territory of foreigners", probably a reference to a Norse settlement in the area. Linguist Alf Sommerfeltpr...

    The poem most likely to have been composed by a native speaker of Fingallian is The Fingallian Dance, a brief, three-stanza poem written between about 1650 and 1660. It is a mildly indecent poem about a man going to see dancers at a bullring (bull fighting was practised in 17th century Ireland). Although the poem is likely to have been standardised...

    The Purgatoriam Hibernicum is a humorous and bawdy burlesque or travesty on the Roman poet Virgil's Aeneid. It exists in three versions: the original manuscript (Purgatoriam Hibernicum), another manuscript entitled The Fingallian Travesty: the Sixt Book of Virgill's Aenoeids a la mode de Fingaule (1670–5), and a printed version called The Irish Hud...

    In John Dunton's Letters from Ireland (1698) he writes that in Fingal "they have a sort of jargon speech peculiar to themselves, and understand not one word of Irish, and are as little understood by the English". Dunton gives a sample of the language; a lamentation that a mother made over the grave of her son, who was a keen fisher and hunter. Note...

    Although Fingallian is no longer spoken, a large number of dialect words unique to Fingal have survived, especially in traditional Fingal towns and villages such as Swords (now a very large suburb of Dublin), Skerries, Rush, Lusk, Donabate, Garristown, Oldtown, Balrothery, Portrane and Naul. Major sources for these include glossaries in an article ...

    Archer, Patrick (1975). Fair Fingall. An Taisce(reprint).
    Hogan, J. J.; O'Neill,Patrick C. (1947). A North County Dublin Glossary. Béaloideas 17. pp. 262–283.
    Kerrigan, John (2008). Archipelagic English. Oxford University Press. p. 64.
    McCrum, Robert; Cran, William; MacNeil, Robert (1993). The Story of English. Penguin (Non-classics). p. 182. ISBN 0-14-015405-1.
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  3. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › FingalFingal - Wikipedia

    Fingallian is an extinct language, a hybrid of Old and Middle English and Old Norse, with Gaelic influences. It was spoken by the people of Fingal until the mid-19th century. Fingal is within the part of the Eastern and Midland Regional Assembly, established in 2015, one of three such regional assemblies in the state.

    • 456 km² (176 sq mi)
    • Leinster
  4. This article is within the scope of WikiProject Ireland, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Ireland on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks. Ireland Wikipedia:WikiProject Ireland Template:WikiProject Ireland Ireland articles: Stub

    • History
    • The Fingallian Dance
    • Purgatorium Hibernicum
    • Letters from Ireland
    • Modern Fingal English
    • See Also
    • Notes
    • External Links

    Fingallian was spoken in the region of Fingal, traditionally the part of County Dublin north of the River Tolka, and now a separate county. It was spoken in the area near the northern border. The name "Fingal" is from the Irish Fine Gall, or "territory of foreigners", probably a reference to a Norse settlement in the area. Linguist Alf Sommerfeltpr...

    The poem most likely to have been composed by a native speaker of Fingallian is "The Fingallian Dance", a brief, three-verse poem written between about 1650 and 1660. It is mildly indecent poem about a man going to see dancers at a bullring (bull fighting was practised in 17th century Ireland). Although the poem is likely to have been standardised ...

    The Purgatoriam Hibernicum is a humorous and bawdy burlesque or travesty on the Roman poet Virgil's Aeneid. It exists in three versions: the original manuscript (Purgatoriam Hibernicum), another manuscript entitled The Fingallian Travesty: the Sixt Book of Virgill's Aenoeids a la mode de Fingaule (1670–5), and a printed version called The Irish Hud...

    In John Dunton's Letters from Ireland (1698) he writes that in Fingal "they have a sort of jargon speech peculiar to themselves, and understand not one word of Irish, and are as little understood by the English". Dunton gives a sample of the language; a lamentation that a mother made over the grave of her son, who was a keen fisher and hunter. Note...

    Although Fingallian is no longer spoken, a large number of dialect words unique to Fingal have survived, especially in traditional Fingal towns and villages such as Swords (now a very large suburb of Dublin), Skerries, Rush, Lusk, Donabate, Garristown, Oldtown, Balrothery, and Naul. Major sources for these include glossaries in an article in the fo...

    Archer, Patrick (1975). Fair Fingall. An Taisce (reprint).
    Hogan, J. J.; O'Neill,Patrick C. (1947). A North County Dublin Glossary. Béaloideas 17. p. 262-283.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
    Kerrigan, John (2008). Archipelagic English. Oxford University Press. p. 64.
    McCrum, Robert; Cran, William;; MacNeil, Robert (1993). The Story of English. Penguin (Non-classics). p. 182. ISBN 0-14-015405-1.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  5. Фінгальська мова — зникла форма англійських мов, якою говорили в ірландському графстві Фінгал до середини 19 століття. Мова походить від середньоанглійської, утворена внаслідок норманського вторгнення в Ірландію в 12 столітті. Була досить подібною до мови йола, яка була поширена в графстві Вексфорд . Зміст 1 Історія 2 Література фінгальською

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