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  1. House of Welf - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Welf

    The House of Welf is the older branch of the House of Este, a dynasty whose earliest known members lived in Lombardy in the late 9th/early 10th century, sometimes called Welf-Este. The first member was Welf I, Duke of Bavaria , also known as Welf IV; he inherited the property of the Elder House of Welf when his maternal uncle Welf III , Duke of Carinthia and Verona, the last male Welf of the Elder House, died in 1055.

    • Welf I, Duke of Bavaria

      Biography. Welf was the son of Albert Azzo II, Margrave of...

    • Origins

      The House of Welf is the older branch of the House of Este,...

  2. Elder House of Welf - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elder_House_of_Welf

    The Elder House of Welf was a Frankish noble dynasty of European rulers documented since the 9th century. Closely related to the Carolingian dynasty, it consisted of a Burgundian and a Swabian group. It has not been definitively clarified, however, whether the two groups formed one dynasty or whether they shared the same name by coincidence only. While the Elder House became extinct in the male line with the death of Duke Welf of Carinthia in 1055, his sister Kunigunde married into the Italian H

    • None; extinct
    • Ruthard, Count of Argengau
  3. Category:House of Welf - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:House_of_Welf

    Pages in category "House of Welf" The following 33 pages are in this category, out of 33 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ().

  4. The House of Welf (also Guelf or Guelph) was a Eu­ro­pean dy­nasty that has in­cluded many Ger­man and British mon­archs from the 11th to 20th cen­tury and Em­peror Ivan VI of Rus­sia in the 18th cen­tury.

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  6. House of Welf | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/House_of_Welf
    • Origins
    • Bavaria and Saxony
    • Brunswick and Hanover
    • Early Welf Princes
    • See Also
    • External Links

    The House of Welf is the older branch of the House of Este, a dynasty whose earliest known members lived in Lombardy in the 9th century, sometimes called Welf-Este. The first member was Welf IV; he inherited the property of the Elder House of Welf when his maternal uncle Welf III, Duke of Carinthia and Verona, the last male Welf of the Elder House, died in 1055. Welf IV was the son of Welf III's sister Kunigunde of Altdorf and her husband Albert Azzo II of Este, Margrave of Milan. In 1070, Welf IV became duke of Bavaria. Welf V married Countess Matilda of Tuscany, who died childless and left him her possessions, including Tuscany, Ferrara, Modena, Mantua, and Reggio, which played a role in the Investiture controversy. Since the Welf dynasty sided with the Pope in this controversy, partisans of the Pope came to be known in Italy as Guelphs; see Guelphs and Ghibellines.

    Henry the Black, duke of Bavaria from 1120–1126, was the first of the three dukes of the Welf dynasty called Henry. His wife Wulfhild was the heiress of the house of Billung, possessing the territory around Lüneburg in Lower Saxony. Their son, Henry the Proud was the son-in-law and heir of Emperor Lothair of Supplinburg and became also duke of Saxony on Lothair's death. Lothair left his territory around Brunswick, inherited from his mother of the Brunonen family, to his daughter Gertrud. Her husband Henry the Proud became then the favoured candidate in the imperial election against Conrad III of the Hohenstaufen. But Henry lost the election, as the other princes feared his power and temperament, and was dispossessed of his duchies by Conrad III. Henry's brother Welf VI (1115-1191), Markgrave of Tuscany, later left his Swabian territories around Ravensburg, the original possessions of the Elder House of Welf, to his nephew Emperor Frederick Iand thus to the House of Hohenstaufen. Hen...

    Henry's son Otto of Brunswick was elected King of the Romans and crowned Holy Roman Emperor Otto IV after years of further conflicts with the Hohenstaufen emperors. He incurred the wrath of Pope Innocent III and was excommunicated in 1215. Otto was forced to abdicate the imperial throne by the Hohenstaufen Frederick II.He was the only Welf to become emperor of the Holy Roman Empire. Henry the Lion's grandson Otto the Child became duke of a part of Saxony in 1235, the new Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and died there in 1252. The duchy was divided several times during the High Middle Ages amongst various lines of the House of Welf, but the rulers all continued to be styled as the "Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg" in addition to "Prince of Lüneburg", "Prince of Wolfenbüttel", "Prince of Calenberg-Gottingen" or "Prince of Grubenhagen" etc. The subsequent history of the dukedom and its subordinate principalities was characterized by numerous divisions and reunifications. The subordinate states...

    Dukes of Bavaria and Saxony

    1. Welf I, Duke of Bavaria (1070-1077, 1096-1101) 2. Welf II, son of Welf I; Duke of Bavaria (1101–1120) 3. Henry IX, the Black, son of Welf I; Duke of Bavaria (1120–1126) 4. Henry X, the Proud, son of Henry the Black; Duke of Bavaria (1126–1138), Duke of Saxony (1137–1139) 5. Henry XI, the Lion, son of Henry the Proud; Duke of Saxony (1142–1180), Duke of Bavaria (1156–1180)

    Count Palatine of the Rhine

    1. Henry V, son of Henry the Lion; Count Palatine of the Rhine (1195–1213) 2. Henry VI, son of Henry V; Count Palatine of the Rhine (1213-1214)

    Holy Roman Emperor

    1. Otto IV, son of Henry the Lion; Holy Roman Emperor (1198-1215)

  7. Welf - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf

    Elder House of Welf, dynasty of European rulers in the 9th through 11th centuries to 1055 House of Welf , European dynasty that included many German and British monarchs from the 11th to 20th century This disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name.

  8. Welf (father of Judith) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_(father_of_Judith)

    Welf I (or Hwelf; died about 825) is the first documented ancestor of the Elder House of Welf.He is mentioned as a count (comes) in the Frankish lands of Bavaria.

  9. Welf I - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_I

    Welf I or Welfo (died before 876) was a Swabian nobleman. He was a member of the Elder House of Welf. Welf I count in Swabia. Welf was probably a son of Conrad I of Auxerre, and seems to have taken over his father's offices in Swabia, namely: count of Alpgau, count of Linzgau, and possibly count of Argengau.

  10. House of Este - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Este

    The elder branch of the House of Este, the House of Welf, historically rendered as "Guelf" or "Guelph" in English, produced dukes of Bavaria (1070–1139, 1156–1180), dukes of Saxony (1138–1139, 1142–1180), a German King (1198–1218), the dukes of Brunswick and Lüneburg (1208–1918) (later styled the "Electors of Hanover") when the two branches of the family recombined in 1705. The senior branch of the House of Welf continued to be ruled by the princes of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, as ...