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  1. Lutheranism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutheranism

    Lutheranism is one of the largest branches of Protestantism that identifies with the teachings of Martin Luther, a 16th-century German reformer whose efforts to reform the theology and practice of the church launched the Protestant Reformation.

  2. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Lutheranism is a denomination within the Christian religion. The namesake who led the Lutherans in their protest against the Roman Catholic Church was Martin Luther. He began this protest against the Catholic Church in the 16th century.

  3. Evangelical Lutheran Church in America - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evangelical_Lutheran...

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant Lutheran church headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. The ELCA was officially formed on January 1, 1988, by the merging of three Lutheran church bodies. As of 2018

  4. Lutheranism by region - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutheranism_by_region

    Lutheranism is present on all inhabited continents with an estimated 80 million adherents, out of which 74.2 million are affiliated with the Lutheran World Federation. A major movement that first began the Reformation, it constitutes one of the largest Protestant branches claiming around 80 million out of 920 million Protestants.

  5. Lutheran World Federation - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutheran_World_Federation

    The Lutheran World Federation (LWF; German: Lutherischer Weltbund) is a global communion of national and regional Lutheran denominations headquartered in the Ecumenical Centre in Geneva, Switzerland. The federation was founded in the Swedish city of Lund in the aftermath of the Second World War in 1947 to coordinate the activities of the many ...

  6. High church Lutheranism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Church_Lutheranism

    e High church Lutheranism is a movement that began in 20th-century Europe and emphasizes worship practices and doctrines that are similar to those found within both Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy and the Anglo-Catholic wing of Anglicanism.

  7. Confessional Lutheranism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confessional_Lutheranism

    Confessional Lutheranism is a name used by Lutherans to designate those who believe in the doctrines taught in the Book of Concord of 1580 (the Lutheran confessional documents) in their entirety. Confessional Lutherans maintain that faithfulness to the Book of Concord which is a summary of the teachings found in Scripture, requires attention to ...

  8. Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutheran_Church–Missouri...

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod (LCMS), often referred to simply as the Missouri Synod, is a traditional, confessional Lutheran denomination in the United States. With slightly under 2 million members, it is the second-largest Lutheran body in the United States.

  9. Calendar of saints (Lutheran) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendar_of_Saints_(Lutheran)

    The Lutheran Calendar of Saints is a listing which specifies the primary annual festivals and events that are celebrated liturgically by some Lutheran Churches in the United States. The calendars of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod (LCMS) are from the 1978 Lutheran Book of Worship and ...

  10. Divine Service (Lutheran) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divine_Service_(Lutheran)

    The Divine Service (German: Gottesdienst) is a title given to the Eucharistic liturgy as used in the various Lutheran churches. It has its roots in the pre-Tridentine Mass as revised by Martin Luther in his Formula missae ("Form of the Mass") of 1523 and his Deutsche Messe ("German Mass") of 1526.