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  1. Maryland - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryland

    Maryland has an area of 12,406.68 square miles (32,133.2 km 2) and is comparable in overall area with Belgium [11,787 square miles (30,530 km 2)]. It is the 42nd largest and 9th smallest state and is closest in size to the state of Hawaii [10,930.98 square miles (28,311.1 km 2)], the next smaller state.

  2. History of Maryland - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_maryland

    Establishment. George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore, applied to Charles I for a royal charter for what was to become the Province of Maryland.After Calvert died in April 1632, the charter for "Maryland Colony" (in Latin Terra Mariae) was granted to his son, Cecilius Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore, on June 20, 1632.

  3. Maryland is the only state with a motto in Italian. Maryland has many places important to the American Revolutionary War , the War of 1812 , and the American Civil War . One of these places is Fort McHenry , which defended against the British Empire during the War of 1812.

    • April 28, 1788 (7th)
    • Annapolis
  4. Ocean City, Maryland - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocean_City,_Maryland

    Ocean City has become a well-known city in Maryland due to the rapid expansion of Ocean City that took place during the post-war boom. In 1952, with the completion of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge , Ocean City became easily accessible to people in the Baltimore–Washington metropolitan area .

  5. University of Maryland, College Park - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Maryland...

    On March 6, 1856, the forerunner of today's University of Maryland was chartered as the Maryland Agricultural College.Two years later, Charles Benedict Calvert (1808–1864), a future U.S. Representative (Congressman) from the sixth congressional district of Maryland, 1861–1863, during the American Civil War and descendant of the first Lord Baltimores, colonial proprietors of the Province of ...

    • Suburban, 1,340 acres (5.4 km²)
    • Fatti maschii, parole femine (unofficial)
    • March 6, 1856; 164 years ago
    • 41,200 (Fall 2018)
  6. Hagerstown, Maryland - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hagerstown,_Maryland

    Hagerstown / ˈ h eɪ ɡ ər z t aʊ n / is a city in Washington County, Maryland, United States and the county seat of Washington County. The population of Hagerstown city proper at the 2010 census was 39,662, and the population of the Hagerstown-Martinsburg Metropolitan Area (extending into West Virginia) was 269,140.

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  8. Hyattsville, Maryland - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyattsville,_Maryland

    Hyattsville is also served by the Riverdale MARC commuter train station, as well as a few Metrobus and "The Bus" routes. Students and staff at the University of Maryland College Park have access to the free Shuttle UM Bus that goes from Historic Hyattsville to the University of Maryland College Park Campus. Education

  9. Frederick, Maryland - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick,_Maryland

    Frederick is a city in, and the county seat, of Frederick County, Maryland.It is part of the Baltimore–Washington Metropolitan Area.Frederick has long been an important crossroads, located at the intersection of a major north–south Indian trail and east–west routes to the Chesapeake Bay, both at Baltimore and what became Washington, D.C. and across the Appalachian mountains to the Ohio ...

  10. Cumberland, Maryland - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumberland,_Maryland

    Cumberland is a city in and the county seat of Allegany County, Maryland, United States.It is the primary city of the Cumberland, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area.At the 2010 census, the city had a population of 20,859, and the metropolitan area had a population of 103,299.

    • 627 ft (191 m)
    • Allegany
  11. McCulloch v. Maryland - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McCulloch_v._Maryland

    McCulloch v. Maryland, 17 U.S. (4 Wheat.) 316 (1819), was a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that defined the scope of the U.S. Congress's legislative power and how it relates to the powers of American state legislatures. The dispute in McCulloch involved

    • James McCulloch v. The State of Maryland, John James
    • Judgment for John James, Baltimore County Court; affirmed, Maryland Court of Appeals
    • Marshall, joined by unanimous
    • None