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  1. The House of the Arrow (novel) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › The_House_of_the_Arrow_(novel)

    The House of the Arrow is a 1924 detective novel by British writer A.E.W. Mason that has inspired several films of the same title. It features the fictional French detective Inspector Hanaud

  2. The House of the Arrow - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › The_House_of_the_Arrow

    The House of the Arrow may refer to: . The House of the Arrow (novel), a 1924 detective novel by British writer A.E.W. Mason The House of the Arrow, a 1930 British mystery film directed by Leslie S. Hiscott

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  4. The House of the Arrow (1953 film) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › The_House_of_the_Arrow

    The House of the Arrow is a 1953 British mystery film directed by Michael Anderson and starring Oskar Homolka, Robert Urquhart and Yvonne Furneaux.It is the fourth film version of the 1924 novel The House of the Arrow by A. E. W. Mason, featuring his French detective Inspector Hanaud.

  5. The House of the Arrow (1940 film) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › The_House_of_the_Arrow

    The House of the Arrow is a 1940 British mystery film directed by Harold French and starring Kenneth Kent, Diana Churchill and Belle Chrystall. It was made at Elstree Studios. The film is an adaptation of A.E.W. Mason's 1924 novel The House of the Arrow featuring the French detective Inspector Hanaud.

  6. The House of the Arrow - Wikisource, the free online library

    en.wikisource.org › wiki › The_House_of_the_Arrow

    The House of the Arrow is a 1924 detective novel by British writer A.E.W. Mason that has inspired several films of the same title. It features the fictional French detective Inspector Hanaud. — Excerpted from The House of the Arrow (novel) on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

  7. The Black Arrow: A Tale of the Two Roses - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › The_Black_Arrow

    The Black Arrow: A Tale of the Two Roses is an 1888 novel by Robert Louis Stevenson.It is both a historical adventure novel and a romance novel.It first appeared as a serial in 1883 with the subtitle "A Tale of Tunstall Forest" beginning in Young Folks; A Boys' and Girls' Paper of Instructive and Entertaining Literature, vol. XXII, no. 656 (Saturday, 30 June 1883) and ending in vol. XXIII, no ...

  8. Arrowsmith (novel) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Arrowsmith_(novel)

    Arrowsmith is a novel by American author Sinclair Lewis, first published in 1925.It won the 1926 Pulitzer Prize (which Lewis declined). Lewis was greatly assisted in its preparation by science writer Paul de Kruif, who received 25% of the royalties on sales, although Lewis was listed as the sole author.

  9. Herne the Hunter - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Herne_the_Hunter

    Legend. The earliest written account of Herne comes from Shakespeare's play "The Merry Wives of Windsor" (believed to have been written around 1597).Officially published versions of the play refer only to the tale of Herne as the ghost of a former Windsor Forest keeper who haunts a particular oak tree at midnight in the winter time; he is said to have horns, shake chains and cause cattle to ...

  10. Martin Amis - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Martin_Amis
    • Early Life
    • Early Writing
    • Later Career
    • Other Websites

    Amis was born in Swansea, South Wales. He was the middle of three children, with an older brother, Philip, and a younger sister, Sally. He went to many different schools in the 1950s and 1960s. The fame of his father's first novel Lucky Jim sent the Amises to Princeton, New Jersey, where his father lectured. Amis's parents, Hilly and Kingsley, divorcedwhen he was twelve. Amis graduated from Exeter College, Oxford. He graduated with a first-class degree in English. After Oxford, he got a job at The Times Literary Supplement. At age 27, he became literary editor of The New Statesman.

    His first novel The Rachel Papers (1973) won the Somerset Maugham Award. It tells the story of a smart, self-centered teenager (which Amis says he based on himself) and his relationship with his girlfriend in the year before going to university. Dead Babies (1975) has a typically 1960s plot. It has a house full of characters who abuse various substances. A movieversion was made in 2000 which was unsuccessful. Success (1977) told the story of two foster-brothers, Gregory Riding and Terry Service, and their good and bad luck. Other People: A Mystery Story (1981), about a young woman coming out of a coma.

    Money (subtitled A Suicide Note) is a first-person narrative by John Self. He was an advertising man who wanted to be a movie director. The book follows him as he flies back and forth across the Atlantic looking for success. The book was a huge success and is Amis's most highly regarded work. London Fields is Amis's longest book. It show the encounters between three main characters in London in 1999, as a climate disasterdraws near. Time's Arrow is about a doctor who helped torture Jews during the Holocaust. It was written in the form of an autobiography. The story is unusual because time runs backwards during the entire novel. The Experience is mainly about his relationship with his father, Kingsley Amis. He also writes about finding long-lost daughter, Delilah Seale and of how one of his cousins, 21-year-old Lucy Partington, became a victim of suspected serial killer Fred West. He lives and writes in London and Uruguay and is married to writer Isabel Fonseca, his second wife.

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