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      • A standard-gauge railway is a railway with a track gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄ 2 in). The standard gauge is also called Stephenson gauge after George Stephenson, International gauge , UIC gauge, uniform gauge, normal gauge and European gauge in the European Union and Russia.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_gauge#:~:text=A%20standard-gauge%20railway%20is%20a%20railway%20with%20a,European%20gauge%20in%20the%20European%20Union%20and%20Russia.
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  2. Standard-gauge railway - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_gauge

    A standard-gauge railway is a railway with a track gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1 ⁄ 2 in).The standard gauge is also called Stephenson gauge after George Stephenson, International gauge, UIC gauge, uniform gauge, normal gauge and European gauge in Europe.

  3. The US standard railroad gauge is 4 feet, 8 ... - Aviation Humor

    aviationhumor.net/the-us-standard-railroad-gauge...

    The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That’s an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that’s the way they built them in England, and English expatriates built the US Railroads. Why did the English build them like that? Because the first rail lines were built […]

  4. Are U.S. Railroad Gauges Based on Roman Chariots?

    www.snopes.com/fact-check/railroad-gauge-chariots

    Apr 16, 2001 · The United States standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches derives from the original specification for an Imperial Roman war chariot. Specifications and bureaucracies live forever ...

  5. Track gauge - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Track_gauge

    Similarly, standard gauge railways in Canada, the US and Mexico use the janney coupler or the compatible tightlock coupling for locomotive-hauled equipment. Terminology. Terms such as broad gauge and narrow gauge do not have any fixed meaning, although standard gauge is generally known world-wide as being 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1 ⁄ 2 in).

  6. Standard gauge | railroad track | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/technology/standard-gauge

    In railroad: The railroad in continental Europe …made to adapt the English standard gauge of 4 feet 8.5 inches (1,435 mm), despite the fact that it was common throughout western Europe (save in Ireland, Spain, and Portugal) as well as in much of the United States and Canada.

  7. Standard gauge railway - definition of Standard gauge railway ...

    www.thefreedictionary.com/Standard+gauge+railway

    Standard gauge railway synonyms, Standard gauge railway pronunciation, Standard gauge railway translation, English dictionary definition of Standard gauge railway. n. 1.

  8. Rail Gauge - The Transcontinental Railroad

    railroad.lindahall.org/essays/rails-guage.html

    One by one, railroad companies moved toward the Stephenson, or standard, gauge. Changing the rails was an expensive process, both in actual labor costs, with some companies hiring thousands of workers to change all their rail lines all at once, and in loss of revenue due to railroad down time.

  9. What is the standard railroad gauge in the US - Answers

    www.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_standard_railroad...

    The standard gauge of railroad track in the US was established by the US Congress at four feet, eight and one half inches on March 3, 1863, not in 1886.

  10. Mar 17, 2015 · The Width of Railroad Tracks is based on a History that Extends Back to Roman Chariots-Fiction! Summary of eRumor: This story is a “We’ve always done it that way” tale. It says that the standard distance between railroad rails in the U.S. is four-feet, eight-and-a-half inches. Why?

  11. Standard and Narrow Gauge in Japan - Sumida Crossing

    sumidacrossing.org/Prototype/StandardNarrowGauge

    England was mostly using “standard gauge” by 1846. The U.S. moved more slowly, and although many railroads were standardized earlier, and the 1863 construction of the transcontinental railroad was required by law to use standard gauge, many did not standardize until 1886.