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  2. The Languages spoken in Cambodia - StudyCountry.com

    www.studycountry.com/guide/KH-language.htm

    Khmer, also known as Cambodian, is by far the most popular language in Cambodia. With approximately 16 million speakers, it is the second most widely spoken Austroasiatic language in the world (after Vietnamese).

  3. CAMBODIA Language | Landenweb.com

    www.landenweb.com/cambodia/language

    Photo:Public domain. The official language of Cambodia is Khmer, spoken by most Cambodians. Khmer belongs to the Austro-Asian Mon-Khmer group, is one of the oldest languages in Southeast Asia and is also spoken in the Mekong Delta in South Vietnam.

  4. Khmer language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khmer_language

    Khmer is spoken by some 13 million people in Cambodia, where it is the official language. It is also a second language for most of the minority groups and indigenous hill tribes there. Additionally there are a million speakers of Khmer native to southern Vietnam (1999 census) and 1.4 million in northeast Thailand (2006).

  5. What language do they speak in Cambodia? - Answers

    www.answers.com/Q/What_language_do_they_speak_in...

    They speak Khmer, which is the language of The Kingdom of Cambodia.People in Cambodia generally speak Khmer, but small minorities speak Vietnamese, Chinese, Cham, and Khmer Loeu.French had been a...

  6. What languages are spoken in Cambodia? - Answers

    www.answers.com/Q/What_languages_are_spoken_in...

    They speak Khmer, which is the language of The Kingdom of Cambodia. People in Cambodia generally speak Khmer, but small minorities speak Vietnamese, Chinese, Cham, and Khmer Loeu. French had been a...

  7. What language do Cambodians speak? | Yahoo Answers

    au.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=...

    The majority of Cambodians, even those who are not ethnic Khmer, speak Khmer, the official language of the country. Ethnic Khmer living in Thailand, in Vietnam, and in Laos speak dialects of Khmer...

  8. Cambodian | EthnoMed

    ethnomed.org/culture/cambodian
    • Geography
    • History & Politics
    • Language
    • Interpersonal Relationships
    • Marriage, Family and Kinship Structure
    • Reproduction
    • Infancy, Childhood and Socialization
    • Nutrition and Food
    • Drinks, Drugs and Indulgences
    • Religious Life

    Cambodia borders Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam in the southeastern part of Asia. Before 1970 Cambodia was fairly rich in natural and agricultural resources. Cambodia, unlike most Southeast Asian countries, enjoyed a stable export business and shipped rice, rubber, coal, and cotton worldwide. Many people lived in small villages near waterways, the majority working in agriculture.

    In contrast to this solid economic foundation, the political framework was unstable. The government was dominated by unpredictable leadership and erratic government policies. Some struggles ended when France established its protectorate over Cambodia in 1863. When Cambodia gained its independence from France in 1953, Prince Norodom Sihanouk ruled the country as an autocracy and continued to rule until 1970. In 1970 his prime minister, General Lon Nol, overthrew him and established a military government. The Khmer Rouge (Red or Communist Cambodians), a small movement of revolutionaries, began as a reaction to the military rule of Lon Nol and waged a war with the army until 1975 (Mattson, 1993).

    Khmer (also known as Cambodian) is the official language of Cambodia. The Khmer language has the oldest written records of any Southeast Asian language in stone inscriptions dating back to the seventh century (Vickery, 1990). Because of the historical ties of the Khmer people to the culture of India, the language has many words similar to Sanskrit, especially words relating to administrative, political, military and literary subjects. The written language is complex, including 66 consonant symbols, 35 vowel symbols, 33 superscripts, and 33 subscripts (Center for Applied Linguistics, 1981). See: Khmer Language: Non-standard Romanization While Cambodia was a colony of France (1853-1953), French instruction was begun in primary school and all higher education was in French. This education was limited to the elite, and was essential for a successful administrative career because most official documents were in French. Those individuals who were poor or from rural areas (where there were...

    Naming

    This section was written by Paularita Seng, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA. One feature of Cambodian names that often confuse Westerners is the origin of family names and the order in which they are used. This can present confusion in schools and in clinics as filing systems and roll calls are developed. The Cambodian name is always spoken and written in the order of last name then first name. For example: if my last name were Soth, and my first name were Sopheap, my full name would b...

    Status, Role, Prestige

    Traditionally, high status was given only to Buddhist monks and important government officials. Traditional values included a strong family identity, respect for ancestors and the past and a desire for smooth interpersonal relationships, i.e., non confrontational in disagreement, tolerance for ambiguity, and willingness to accept things the way they were (Kinzie, Fredrickson, Ben, Fleck and Karls, 1984). Reportedly there is competition within the Seattle-area community to have status in terms...

    Greetings

    When Cambodians greet each other, they will place their hands, palms together, near their faces and often state the greeting /chum reap sur/. They appreciate such a greeting from individuals other than Cambodians as well. Many young Cambodian Americans who grew up in the United States do not greet older people in the traditional way. This is perceived in the community as a loss of respect. Phrases of Courtesy in Nine Languages: A Tool for Medical Providers This language learning tool features...

    Marriage

    Traditionally, marriages are arranged by the woman’s family and dating is not a common practice. In Seattle, young Cambodians date as a means for finding a spouse, and arranged marriages are on the decline, with few occurring in the last decade. More often people are marrying for love and are respecting the woman’s right to choose her husband. The arranged marriages occurring before, happened mostly among the refugees who arrived in the U.S. as teenagers, and many of those marriages did not l...

    Gender, Status and Age Relationships

    The roles of males and females are given a large amount of respect in traditional Cambodian culture. The traditional role of Khmer women goes back at least to the Angkor era (802 – 1431 A.D.), when the “apsara” or “goddess” was accepted as the embodiment of a virtuous, ideal woman and described in proverbs, folktales and novels as the example of how women should behave. Traditionally, a girl is expected to obey her parents and elders, to be gentle and softly spoken, to behave according to soc...

    Family and Kinship Structure

    In Cambodia the nuclear family is more common than the extended families found in other Southeast Asian cultures. In rural areas, extended families, including grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins often live together for financial reasons. The family is likely to be economically independent, owning enough land and a home to be self-sufficient (Center for Applied Linguistics, 1981). In Seattle, the families fortunate enough to own their home often live together in extended families. Married...

    Pregnancy

    Family planning is uncommon in Cambodia and women will often have many children. In the cities, some women use birth control pills and rarely condoms. Some herbal medicines are thought to be effective for abortion by increasing excess heat in the body. The medicine needs to be ingested daily for effectiveness and may include Chinese herbs with hot water or cho plagwhich is made from tree root, water and wine (Kulig, 1988). In Seattle, it is reported that when Cambodian women use birth control...

    Child Birth and Post Partum Practices

    Few babies are delivered in a hospital by a physician in Cambodia, most are delivered at home by midwives. The postpartum period is considered to be the most important time in life for a woman, called “Sor Sai Kjey” or “Saw Sai Kachai” (SSK). For one month after the birth, she will lie on a bamboo bed with a constant fire underneath. There is no bathing during this time. The woman will drink only hot water, homemade wine, or herbal tea and eat hot fish and pork. This is believed to help repai...

    Infant Feeding and Care

    In Cambodia, most women breastfeed their babies and breastfeeding in public is common with older mothers. Breastfeeding is thought by some to make their baby strong, smart, and obedient to his parents. In Seattle many women feel that breastfeeding is very difficult because of competing school, job, and household responsibilities. Bottlefeeding is more practical. Several reported that they used Simulac, some breastfeed in private, and some start feeding their baby rice soup as early as six wee...

    Child Rearing Practices

    In Seattle, children are encouraged and expected to attend school as this is perceived as the best route to obtaining a well paying job. In Cambodia, their time would have been spent working to help support the family. Traditionally, marriages are arranged by the woman’s family and dating is not a common practice. Arranged marriages reportedly occur frequently in Seattle, however, some young Cambodians date as a means for finding a spouse. Refugee children are a special group. They live in a...

    Each small family group in Cambodia typically owns its own rice paddy lot and vegetable garden and raises livestock. Meal patterns consist of breakfast, lunch, dinner, and occasional snacks. Rice is typically the base of each meal and is accompanied by a clear or a vegetable soup, fish, or meat and vegetables (fresh and dried). Most families eat all three meals together in Southeast Asia (Story and Harris, 1989). Local Cambodians usually do not have a place to grow vegetables or raise livestock and rely on shops in their neighborhood run by other Southeast Asians. The bulk of their food is bought at these stores with only an occasional visit to chain stores such as Safeway. White rice continues as a main staple with accompanying soup. Brown rice is not typically eaten with some local Cambodians stating that it is for birds and prisoners. Some additional favorites include: fish, shrimp, stir fried vegetables and the following vegetables: eggplant, cauliflower, broccoli, string beans,...

    In Cambodia

    In Cambodia may people drink locally brewed rice wine that is relatively inexpensive. It often has herbs, tree bark and/or wild animal parts added and it believed to have medicinal properties. Because of the demand for higher alcohol content, recently some brewers started to spike the wine with insecticides which caused death, blindness and other illnesses. Consequently the Cambodian Ministry of Health appealed to the people to quit drinking the locally brewed rice wine. Traditionally Cambodi...

    In the United States

    In the US, according to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Cambodians most commonly use alcohol and tobacco. Crack cocaine is used to a lesser extent. The Cambodians most at risk of substance abuse are low-income individuals of all ages and of either gender. Khmer weddings in the U.S. always “require” that some form of hard liquor, such as whiskey, be served. It is considered offensive not to provide alcohol to wedding guests. Recent studies in California among three Asian American...

    Theravada Buddhism has been the official religion in Cambodia, although Christianity and animism are also found. For many centuries monks had lived in wats (temple monasteries) in every community in Cambodia. They practiced and taught that the suffering we all experience can be traced to desire or passion. The way to escape constant suffering is to diminish one’s desire of lust, aggression, avariciousness, and deceit. During the war between 1970 and 1975 more than one-third of the 3,369 wats were destroyed; many of the 65,000 monks and novices were killed or became refugees. Between 1975-1979, Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge sought to systematically completely obliterate Buddhism from Cambodian society. It was not until after the invasion of Cambodia by the Vietnamese in 1979 that Buddhism was permitted to be restored in Cambodia. An official report in 1982 stated that 2,311 monks had returned to the Buddhist order (Keyes, 1990). Most of Seattle’s Cambodian population are Buddhist, howe...

  9. Cambodian accent? - Cambodia Expats Online: Forum | News ...

    cambodiaexpatsonline.com/cambodian-culture-and...

    Yes, Cambodians have several accents as do Thais and Vietnamese. In fact, if a language is wide spread enough or sometime separated by mountains some speakers who live n a valley cannot understand the the accent or the dialect of another neighboring valley as is the case in Austria or Switzerland.

  10. Bayon, the | temple, Cambodia | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/topic/the-Bayon

    In order to conform with traditional mythology, the Khmer kings built themselves a series of artificial mountains on the Cambodian plain at the royal city of Angkor, each crowned by shrines containing images of gods and of themselves, their families, and their ancestors.

  11. Cambodian immigrant's deportation ends in tragedy for R.I ...

    www.providencejournal.com/news/20190503/cambodian...

    May 03, 2019 · Many of what the U.S. Census Bureau says are 5,749 Cambodians living in the state were motivated to emigrate for the same reasons as the Sans: a genocide led by the Khmer Rouge that left from 1.7 ...