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  1. Michael Anderson Obituary (2003) - Evanston, IL - TBO.com

    www.legacy.com › obituaries › tbo

    Feb 01, 2003 · The son of an Air Force man, Anderson was born in Plattsburgh, grew up on military bases but considered Spokane his hometown. He developed his love of flying early. "I was always fascinated by...

    • 820 Davis, Suite 210, 60201, IL
  2. Born on Christmas Day, 1959, in Plattsburgh, N.Y., the son of an Air Force serviceman, Michael and his family moved to Spokane, Wash., when Michael was 11. Since the day he first got a toy airplane, Michael dreamed of the cosmos and space flight. Early on he memorized the names of most of the American astronauts.

  3. Sep 03, 2015 · Lori Marie Albrecht was born Dec. 27, 1965, in Aberdeen, S.D., the daughter of Allen and Janice (Goreham) Anderson. Lori married Michael Albrecht on Feb. 8, 1985, in Zweibrucken, West Germany, where Michael was serving in the United States Air Force.

  4. Michael McLachlan Obituary (1946 - 2021) - Durango, CO - The ...

    obituaries.durangoherald.com › us › obituaries

    Jun 24, 2021 · Born in Dover, DE on April 18, 1946, Michael was the second of six children born to U.S. Air Force Colonel Joseph and Audrey McLachlan. They spent their childhoods living on various bases around...

    • Durango, 81301, CO
    • June 23, 2021
    • (970) 247-2312
    • August 8, 2021
  5. CNN.com - Transcripts

    edition.cnn.com › TRANSCRIPTS › 1408

    Anderson, it was almost exactly one year ago where these two man were taking almost the exact same walk around the south lawn of the White House about airstrikes against Syria and ultimately in ...

  6. 1983 Saunders County History - Family Stories

    negenweb.net › NESaunders › 1983hist

    Don was born at Colon, Ne., to Robert and Laurine Anderson, and lived there all his life until he joined the U.S. Navy upon high school graduation and served his country for two years. I, Ruth, was born and grew up in Prentice, Wis. and came to Wahoo to attend Luther College in 1947 and met Don upon his discharge from the Navy.

  7. The Innocent Man, Part Two – Texas Monthly

    www.texasmonthly.com › the-innocent-man-part-two
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.

    During the five years that Michael and his attorneys sought to have the bandana tested and Bradley tried mightily to resist their efforts, the bandana itself sat within the Williamson County Sheriff’s Office. It didn’t look like anything extraordinary. The deep-blue Western-themed handkerchief was bordered by a white lariat pattern that repeatedly spelled, in loopy script, the word “Wrangler.” Scattered across the fabric, which was deeply creased, were a number of small brown bloodstains. Whose blood was it? On January 8, 2010, the Third Court of Appeals reversed Stubblefield’s decision and allowed testing on the bandana to go forward. Justice G. Alan Waldrop noted in his decision that the unidentified fingerprints on the sliding-glass door of the Morton home and the footprint in the backyard did, in fact, suggest that there was a trail of evidence connecting the bandana to the crime scene. Further, he suggested that DNA testing could definitively determine whether or not there was...

    At first the whereabouts of Mark Alan Norwood—the convicted felon whose DNA had been detected on the bandana—were unknown. To prevent his name from being publicized, he was referred to only as John Doe in court documents. “We were very concerned about what he might do if he saw his name in print, because we felt he was a flight risk,” Raley told me. Locating him was of paramount importance to Michael’s attorneys, but they did not believe that the district attorney’s office felt the same sense of urgency. Even after Williamson County opened an investigation on Norwood in August 2011, Bradley and his staff continued to question the importance of the DNA results, casting doubt on the bandana’s “chain of evidence.” (Strict protocols now dictate how law enforcement collects and transports evidence; in Michael’s case, the bandana had been recovered not by a police officer but by Christine’s brother, John Kirkpatrick, who had picked it up, placed it in a plastic bag, and driven it to the s...

    By the time Michael walked out of prison a free man, Ken Anderson had long been a respected member of his community. He was a Sunday school teacher and Boy Scout volunteer who cast himself, in his rulings, as a champion of both crime victims and children. A father of two, the 59-year-old jurist held a regular mock trial for fifth graders that he called “The Great Stolen Peanut Butter and Jelly Caper,” and he frequently made appearances at local schools to talk about the dangers of drugs and alcohol. He was a prolific writer, and of the eight books he had written, his most impressive work was a biography of Dan Moody, a Williamson County DA from the twenties whose prosecution of the Ku Klux Klan helped win him statewide acclaim and put him in the Governor’s Mansion. Like Moody’s, Anderson’s ambition reached beyond Williamson County. At the courthouse, rumor held that he had his sights set on obtaining an appointment to the Court of Criminal Appeals, the state’s highest court for crim...

  8. Michael O'Flanagan - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Michael_O&
    • Early Life and Education
    • Fundraising in The United States
    • Gaelic League Envoy
    • Cliffoney
    • Crossna
    • General Election 1918
    • Republican Envoy
    • Return to Ireland 1925
    • President of Sinn Féin
    • Death and Funeral

    Michael Flanagan was born on 13 August 1876 at Cloonfower in the parish of Kilkeeven, close to Castlerea in County Roscommon. He was the fourth of eight children born to Edward Flanagan (born 1842) and Mary Crawley (born 1847); the children in order of birth were Maire, Luke, Patrick, Michael, Brigid, Edmund, Kate and Joseph. Both parents were fluent speakers of Irish and English, living on a small farm in what was known as a breac or speckled gaeltacht. When he was three years old, the 1879 famine swept through the west of Ireland. While conditions were not as severe as thirty years earlier, there was great fear among the people who had survived the earlier starvation, expressed in a wave of religious fervour, as for example, the apparitions at Knock in 1879. The Flanagan family were staunch supporters of the Fenian movement. As a young man Michael lived through the evictions, boycotts and shootings of the Land War. His parents were and members of the Land League, and he was fascin...

    O'Flanagan was a keen supporter rural development and Irish self-reliance, with practical knowledge and point of view, having grown up on a small farm. He was a skilled public speaker and communicator and was vocal in agitating for radical social and political change. In 1904 he was invited by his Bishop John Joseph Clancy and Horace Plunkett to travel to the United States on a speaking and fundraising tour. Douglas Hydewrote to him on 3 November to say that he had read O'Flanagan's work on Irish Phonetics with great interest and that he was sorry to see him go to America. His mission was to promote Irish industry, in particular the lace industry, and to find investment and collect donations for agricultural and industrial projects in the west of Ireland. The diocese of Elphin had purchased the Dillon estate at Loughglynnin County Roscommon and had established a dairy industry there, managed by nuns of the Franciscan Missionaries of Mary. Part of O'Flanagan's mission was to pay off...

    In August, after attending a meeting of the Gaelic League O'Flanagan was elected to the standing committee. He reported "the existence in every part of the States of an Irish population that is ever anxious to hear of home progress and to meet any representatives of any Irish movement." Within a few weeks of his appointment to the standing committee the Gaelic League asked him to return to United States with Fionan MacColum on a fundraising mission to repair the League's dwindling finances. O'Flanagan advised Douglas Hyde to seek permission from Bishop Clancy, who not only agreed, but published a letter congratulating O'Flanagan on his selection. O'Flanagan and MacColum arrived on 1 October 1910 and set up an office at 624 Madison Avenue in New York. Problems arose with American funders over the controversial "Playboy of the Western World" with John Devoythreatening to withdraw his support from the Gaelic League, if this was the kind of Irish culture American money was supporting. O...

    In late July 1914 the Bishop Bernard Coyne transferred O'Flanagan to Cliffoney, a small village in the parish of Ahamlish in north county Sligo. He had instructions from the bishop to assist the ailing priest, help the faltering lace industry in Cliffoney, and to look for land or a building for a village hall. Initially he rented a Lodge in Mullaghmore before eventually moving up to Cliffoney where he rented a cottage from Mrs. Hannan. While living in Cliffoney he actively campaigned against recruitment in the British army. His sermons were noted down by the RIC from the barracks next to the church who often occupied the front pew with notebooks to hand. Along with his old pupil from Summerhill, Alec McCabe, O'Flanagan was instrumental in re-organising the company of the Irish Volunteers in the Cliffoney area after the split with Redmond's National Volunteers. "At that time we had a Catholic Curate, the late Father Michael O'Flanagan, a great Irishman and strong supporter of the Rep...

    On 25 November 1915, O'Flanagan delivered a lecture entitled "God Save Ireland" to a packed audience in St. Mary's Hall, Belfast at a commemoration for the Manchester Martyrs. In January 1916 he took the train to Cork where he spoke to a monster crowd at an anti-conscription meeting chaired by Thomás MacCurtáin—later assassinated by Crown forces—and policed by Terence MacSwineywho would die in 1920 after a 74-day hunger strike. O'Flanagan's fiery speech was recorded by the RIC and widely reported in the national press. Upon his return to Crossna he was sanctioned by Bishop Coyne, who sent O"Flanagan a letter on 14 January 1916 stating: The letter concluded, "I remain your grieved and afflicted Bishop, signed Bernard Coyne." He was invited to speak at a gathering of the Volunteers in Dundalk, but declined, sending a copy of the Bishop's letter to illustrate his problem. O'Flanagan, sometimes ignored the Bishop's orders, and presided over meetings at Ringsend and Donnybrook in Dublin...

    The Sinn Féin Ard Feis took place in the Mansion House on 29 October. With most of the leadership in prison, O'Flanagan chaired the meeting and gave the main address. As expected, when the war ended the first general election since 1910 was called. On 11 November, coinciding with Armistice Day, Sinn Féin convened again to launch their General Election campaign. O'Flanagan toured the length and breadth of the country as one of the main and most popular public speakers for Sinn Féin. There are numerous accounts of his speeches and journeys scattered throughout the Bureau of Military History witness statements. He was usually accompanied by members of the Irish Volunteers for bodyguards. The campaign coincided with an outbreak of influenza, and many people died throughout Ireland. The 1918 election was fought under a franchise tripled in size, allowing women and many younger men to vote for the first time. O'Flanagan spoke at Ballaghadereen where he spoke of the sacrifice of the men of...

    At the Sinn Féin Ard-Feis at the end of October 1921, O'Flanagan was selected to travel to America as a Republican Envoy. After some difficulties about his passport and status, he landed in the United States in November. He was filmed and interviewed by British Pathéon his arrival in New York. O'Flanagan was touring the east coast giving lectures and getting plenty of newspaper coverage in his mission "to help in raising the second external bond certificate loan of Dáil Éireann," when the Anglo-Irish Treaty was signed on 6 December 1921. By January 1922 Sinn Féin had divided on the issue of the Treaty. O'Flanagan and his friend and fellow envoy John J. O'Kelly(Sceilg) were strongly opposed to the Treaty, and refused to accept the validity or authority of the Free State. In 1922 an article by O'Flanagan titled "Co-operation" was published as a sixteen-page booklet by Cumann Leigheacht an Phobailin Dublin. The article discusses the economic and human value of Co-operative Societies fo...

    On 21 February 1925 O'Flanagan arrived home from the United States to help the third incarnation of Sinn Féin contest a number of by-elections. Reformed in 1923 by de Valera, the third Sinn Féin "was a coalition of different elements, and while it no longer included any non-republicans it remained an uneasy combination of extremists and (relative) moderates, of ideologues and politicians, of fundamentalists and realists."Sinn Féin had won 44 seats in the August 1923 general election, but abstained from taking their seats in the Dáil. O'Flanagan was vocal in his dismay about the state of the country after the Civil War, governed by the pro-treaty Free State with the support of the Catholic church. He expressed equally radical views on the abuse of power within the Catholic church and was highly critical of ecclesiastical interference and control over temporal affairs. "During several by-election campaigns in 1925 O'Flanagan heaped abuse on Ireland's bishops for their extreme politica...

    O'Flanagan was elected president of Sinn Féin in October 1933 and held that position until 1935. Brian O'Higgins resigned from the party in protest at O'Flanagan's presidency. For his presidential address at the annual Sinn Féin Ard-Fheis on 14 October 1934, O'Flanagan gave a speech titled "The Strength of Sinn Féin," where he traced the evolution of the party through several incarnations and splits from his unique perspective. O'Flanagan was an active member of the National Graves Association, and in 1935 he unveiled the Moore's Bridge memorial in Kildare in memory of seven republican volunteers executed by the Free State in December 1922. Sinn Féin lacked energy and vision in the mid 1930s. The 1935 Árd Fhéis of Sinn Féin, held in Wynn's Hotel, Dublin, was chaired by O'Flanagan, back after a recent illness. In his address he "stated that Sinn Féin would have contested the recent Galway by-election had they had a candidate of personality. "Sceilg," Count Plunkett and Tom Maguire ha...

    After a short illness in the nursing home at 7 Mount Street Crescent, Dublin, O'Flanagan died of stomach canceron at 4.30 pm on Friday 7 August 1942, within a few days of his sixty-sixth birthday. His last letter was to Bernie Conway of Cliffoney, dated 2 August 1942: O'Flanagan was given a state funeral, organised by Sean Fitzpatrick of the ITGWU. His remains lay in state in the Round Room in City Hall, where he had made his speech at O'Donovan Rossa's funeral in 1915. His remains were laid out in an open coffin and guarded by veterans of the War of Independence and 21,000 people, including Éamon de Valera came to pay their respects. The graveside oration, given by his old friendceilg, was later printed and published by the National Aid Auxiliary Committee, Dublin, 1942.This pamphlet, titled "Fr. Michael O'Flanagan: Sceilg's Graveside Oration, August 10, 1942," has become a collectors item. O'Flanagan is buried in the Republican Plot in Glasnevin Cemetery, between Maude Gonne and A...

  9. The Weirdly Enduring Appeal of Weird Al ... - The New York Times

    www.nytimes.com › 2020/04/09 › magazine

    Apr 09, 2020 · The answer, to that at least, was yes. Long before showtime, the Weird Al fans started streaming in. The vibe was lighthearted reverence. It was a benevolent Weird Al cosplay cult.

  10. Judias Anna Buenoano - DeathPenaltyUSA, the database of ...

    deathpenaltyusa.murderpedia.org › buenoano-judias-anna

    She gave birth to an illegitimate son, christened Michael Schultz, on March 30, 1961, and ever after refused comment on rumors that his father was a pilot from the nearby air force base. On January 21, 1962, she married another air force officer, James Goodyear, and their first child--James, Jr.--was born four years later, on January 16, 1966.

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