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  1. William Lenoir (general) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › William_Lenoir_(general)

    William Lenoir was an American Revolutionary War officer and prominent statesman in late 18th-century and early 19th-century North Carolina. Both the City of Lenoir, North Carolina and Lenoir County, North Carolina are named for him. Additionally, Lenoir City, Tennessee is jointly named for him and for his son, William Ballard Lenoir. The USS Lenoir was also named for him.

    • 1775–1812
    • Fort Defiance Cemetery, Lenoir, North Carolina
  2. William Lenoir - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › William_Lenoir

    William Lenoir (general) (1751–1839), American Revolutionary War officer and later a general in the North Carolina militia; William Ballard Lenoir (1775–1852), his son, member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1815–1817; William B. Lenoir (1939–2010), American engineer and NASA astronaut; William "Billy" Lenoir (1942–2007), American tennis player

  3. William Lenoir (general) — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › William_Lenoir_(general)

    William Lenoir (May 8, 1751 – May 6, 1839) was an American Revolutionary War officer and prominent statesman in late 18th-century and early 19th-century North Carolina. Both the City of Lenoir, North Carolina and Lenoir County, North Carolina are named for him. Additionally, Lenoir City, Tennessee is jointly named for him and for his son, William Ballard Lenoir. The USS Lenoir (AKA-74) was ...

  4. William Ballard Lenoir - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › William_Ballard_Lenoir

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia William Ballard Lenoir (1775–1852; also given as 1781-1855) was known as a businessman and politician in what is now known as Lenoir City, Tennessee, where he moved in the early nineteenth century. He had served in the militia and reached the rank of major.

  5. Talk:William Lenoir (general) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:William_Lenoir_(general)

    This is the talk page for discussing improvements to the William Lenoir (general) article. This is not a forum for general discussion of the article's subject.: Put new text under old text.

  6. William Lenoir (general) | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › William_Lenoir_(general)
    • Family and Early Years
    • Revolutionary War
    • Politics and Public Service
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    The Lenoir name is of French origin, literally translating to "the black," which was a term that was similar to how we now use "dark" to speak of someone with dark hair and complexion. Lenoirs came to the English colonies in America from Brittany as a result of 17th century religious troubles. Brittany was just across the English Channel from Southern England. Because it had such a long coastline, it is no surprise how many mariners came from the area. The Lenoir coat-of-arms, "Le Noir de Nantes" is named for Nantes, the largest city of Brittany and an important seaport. William Lenoir was born the youngest of ten in a French Huguenot family in Brunswick County, Virginia. His mother was Mourning Crawley, the daughter of a well-to-do Virginia planter. Her grandfather was Robert Crawley who was an early vestryman of the most noted surviving colonial church, Bruton Parishin Williamsburg. Lenoir's father was Thomas Lenoir, who, like his own father, was a mariner in early life before his...

    Historian Samuel Ashe called Lenoir an "active and zealous and efficient supporter of the cause of independence." He served with distinction in the American Revolutionary War, in particular taking part in the Battle of Kings Mountain as a Captain in the militia under Benjamin Cleveland. He received minor wounds at that battle. Otherwise, his military service consisted mostly of minor skirmishes with Loyalists and Cherokee Indians. He last saw action at Pyle's massacre, at which his horse was said to be the only American Patriot casualty. Lenoir subsequently gathered troops together to fight at the Battle of Guilford Court House, but arrived too late. After the war, William and his wife, Ann, built their home, called Fort Defiance. Only years after the war did Lenoir achieve the rank of Major General from service in the state militia. Shortly after achieving that rank, he desired to fight in the War of 1812, but was deemed too old to do so. The disappointment of that led Lenoir to re...

    Lenoir, an anti-federalist, served for many years as a justice of the peace and Clerk of Court for Wilkes County, North Carolina.He was a founding member (and briefly, the first president) of the Board of Trustees of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where Lenoir Hallis also named for him. From 1781 to 1795, Lenoir was also a member of the $3 representing Wilkes County and served as Speaker of the North Carolina Senatefrom 1790 to 1795. He was a member of both the state convention of 1788, which rejected the United States Constitution, and the convention of 1789, which ratified it. Lenoir was suspicious of the new constitution and argued that it needed an amendment guaranteeing religious freedom (which it later received). General Lenoir died on May 6, 1839, two days shy of his eighty-eighth birthday. His epitaph, written by Governor David Swain, read in part, "A genuine Whig whose highest eulogy is the record of his deeds."

  7. General William Lenoir, Sr. (1751 - 1839) - Genealogy

    www.geni.com › people › General-William-Lenoir

    Nov 27, 2020 · William Lenoir was a Patriot who most notably fought as a captain at the Battle of Kings Mountain. After the Revolutionary War he made his home on the site of the old Indian fort, Fort Defiance, in the Happy Valley area of what would become Caldwell County, NC. He became a surveyor but maintained his civic duty in a variety of ways.

  8. William Lenoir (general) - Family and Early Years | Family ...

    www.liquisearch.com › william_lenoir_general

    William Lenoir (general) - Family and Early Years Family and Early Years The Lenoir name is of French origin, literally translating to "the black," which was a term that was similar to how we now use "dark" to speak of someone with dark hair and complexion.

  9. Mike Campbell's Thoughts and Experiences: William Lenoir…

    mikecampbell343.blogspot.com › william-lenoir

    Sep 20, 2019 · “William Lenoir (May 8, 1751 – May 6, 1839) was an American Revolutionary War officer and prominent statesman in late 18th-century and early 19th-century North Carolina. Both the City of Lenoir, North Carolina and Lenoir County, North Carolina are named for him. A

  10. Famous Connections | Jason's Family History

    jasonsfamilyhistory.wordpress.com › famous-connections

    William Lenoir – 7th great uncle. Revolutionary War officer and hero at the Battle of Kings Mountain, NC. He was also speaker of the North Carolina state senate. He was a member of the North Carolina state convention that ultimately ratified the U.S. Constitution.

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