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    • Anatolia - Wikipedia
      • Major Anatolian languages included Hittite, Luwian, and Lydian, among other more poorly attested relatives. The Turkification of Anatolia began under the Seljuk Empire in the late 11th century and continued under the Ottoman Empire between the late 13th and early 20th centuries.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatolia#:~:text=Major Anatolian languages included Hittite, Luwian, and Lydian,,between the late 13th and early 20th centuries.
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    What is Anatolian language?

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  2. Anatolian languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatolian_languages

    The Anatolian languages are an extinct branch of Indo-European languages that were spoken in Anatolia, part of present-day Turkey.The best known Anatolian language is Hittite, which is considered the earliest-attested Indo-European language.

  3. Anatolian languages - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatolian_languages

    The Anatolian languages were a branch of Indo-European languages. They are now extinct. They were spoken in Asia Minor (ancient Anatolia) in modern-day Turkey. There are three, or maybe four, known branches. Branches. Melchert (2012) has organised them like this: Proto-Anatolian. Hittite; Palaic; Luwic Luwian; Lycian; Milyan; Carian; Sidetic

  4. Category:Anatolian languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Anatolian_languages

    Anatolian languages is a branch of the Indo-European language family which was spoken in Anatolia ca. 2000 BC - 600 BC. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Anatolian languages.

  5. Proto-Anatolian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Anatolian_language

    Proto-Anatolian is the proto-language from which the ancient Anatolian languages emerged. As with almost all other proto-languages, no attested writings have been found; the language has been reconstructed by applying the comparative method to all the attested Anatolian languages as well as other Indo-European languages. Craig Melchert, an expert on the Anatolian languages, estimates that Proto-Anatolian began to diverge c. 3000 BC, in any case no later than c. 2500 BC.

  6. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia For other uses of "Anatolian", see Anatolian  (disambiguation). The Hittite Empire at its greatest extent under Suppiluliuma I (c. 1350–1322 BC) and Mursili II (c. 1321–1295 BC) Area where the 2nd millennium BC Luwian language was spoken

  7. Anatolian peoples - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatolians

    Anatolians were Indo-European peoples of the Near East identified by their use of the Anatolian languages. These peoples were among the oldest Indo-European ethnolinguistic groups, one of the most archaic, because Anatolians were the first or among the first branches of Indo-European peoples to separate from the initial Proto-Indo-European community that gave origin to the individual Indo ...

  8. Anatolian languages - The Reader Wiki, Reader View of Wikipedia

    thereaderwiki.com/en/Anatolian_languages

    For other uses of "Anatolian", see Anatolian (disambiguation) . The Anatolian languages are an extinct branch of Indo-European languages that were spoken in Anatolia, part of present-day Turkey. The best known Anatolian language is Hittite, which is considered the earliest-attested Indo-European language. Undiscovered until the late 19th and 20th centuries, they are considered the earliest group of languages to branch off from the Indo-European family.

  9. Anatolian - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatolian

    Anatolians, ancient Indo-European peoples who spoke the Anatolian languages. Anatolian High School, a type of Turkish educational institution. Anatolian Plate, the tectonic plate on which Turkey sits. Anatolian hieroglyphs, a script of central Anatolia. Anatolian languages, a group of extinct Indo-European languages.

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