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  1. Eastern Catholic Churches - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Eastern_Catholic_Churches

    The Eastern Catholic Churches or Oriental Catholic Churches, also called the Eastern-rite Catholic Churches, Eastern Rite Catholicism, or simply the Eastern Churches and in some historical cases referred to as Uniates, are twenty-three Eastern Christian sui iuris (autonomous) particular churches of the Catholic Church, in full communion with the pope in Rome.

  2. Eastern Catholic churches - Simple English Wikipedia, the ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Eastern_Catholic_churches

    Eastern Catholic churches From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Eastern Catholic Churches are autocephalous Christian churches. They recognize the Bishop of Rome as their spiritual leader, like other Catholics.They differ on ideas as how a mass should be organised, or which prayers are more important than others.

  3. Catholic particular churches and liturgical rites - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Rites_of_Eastern_Catholic

    The Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches states that the rites with which it is concerned (but which it does not list) spring from the following five traditions: Alexandrian, Antiochian, Armenian, Chaldean, and Constantinopolitan. Since it covers only Eastern Catholic churches and rites, it does not mention those of Western tradition.

  4. Talk:Eastern Catholic Churches - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:Eastern_Catholic_Churches

    A another previous discussion on the issue seems to indicate that Eastern Catholic Churches should be capitalized when considering them as a formal, distinct, clearly defined group, and written Eastern Catholic churches when considering members of the set. The current article is clearly abotu the set as a whole.

  5. Eastern Christianity - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Eastern_Christianity
    • Overview
    • Families of churches
    • Catholic–Orthodox ecumenism
    • Migration trends
    • Role of Christians in the Islamic culture

    Eastern Christianity comprises Christian traditions and church families that originally developed during classical and late antiquity in Western Asia, Egypt, Northeast Africa, Eastern Europe, Southeastern Europe, Asia Minor, the Malabar coast of southern India, and parts of the Far East. The term does not describe a single communion or religious denomination. Major Eastern Christian bodies include the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox Churches, the Eastern Catholic Churches, Protest

    Eastern Christians do not share the same religious traditions, but do share many cultural traditions. Christianity divided itself in the East during its early centuries both within and outside of the Roman Empire in disputes about Christology and fundamental theology, as well as through national divisions. It would be many centuries later that Western Christianity fully split from these traditions as its own communion. Major branches or families of Eastern Christianity, each of which has a disti

    Ecumenical dialogue since the 1964 meeting between Pope Paul VI and Orthodox Patriarch Athenagoras I has awoken the nearly 1,000-year hopes for Christian unity. Since the lifting of excommunications during the Paul VI and Athenagoras I meeting in Jerusalem there have been other significant meetings between Popes and Ecumenical Patriarchs of Constantinople. One of the most recent meetings was between Benedict XVI and Bartholomew I, who jointly signed the Common Declaration. It states that "We giv

    There has been a significant Christian migration in the 20th century from the Near East. Fifteen hundred years ago Christians were the majority population in today's Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine and Egypt. In 1914 Christians constituted 25% of the population of the Ottoman Empire. At the beginning of the 21st century Christians constituted 6–7% of the region's population: less than 1% in Turkey, 3% in Iraq, 12% in Syria, 39% in Lebanon, 6% in Jordan, 2.5% in Israel ...

    Christians, especially Nestorians, contributed to the Arab Islamic Civilization during the Umayyads and the Abbasids by translating works of Greek philosophers to Syriac and afterwards to Arabic. They also excelled in philosophy, science and theology and the personal physicians of the Abbasid Caliphs were often Assyrian Christians such as the long serving Bukhtishus. Many scholars of the House of Wisdom were of Christian background. A hospital and medical training center existed at Gundeshapur.

  6. Eastern Orthodox Church - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Eastern_Orthodox_Church

    The Eastern Orthodox Church, officially the Orthodox Catholic Church, is the second-largest Christian church, with approximately 220 million baptised members. It operates as a communion of autocephalous churches, each governed by its bishops in local synods.

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