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  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Hor-AhaHor-Aha - Wikipedia

    Hor-Aha's chief wife was Benerib, whose name was "written alongside his on a number of [historical] pieces, in particular, from tomb B14 at Abydos, Egypt". Tomb B14 is located directly adjacent to Hor-Aha's sepulchre. Hor-Aha also had another wife, Khenthap, with whom he became father of Djer. She is mentioned as Djer's mother on the Cairo ...

  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:Hor-AhaTalk:Hor-Aha - Wikipedia

    • Hor-Aha's Name
    • Infobox Genealogy
    • First Pharaoh
    • First Pharaoh
    • Hor-Aha and Manetho
    • Category:Deaths Due to Hippopotamus Attacks
    • semi-protected Edit Request on 14 July 2020

    The description in the first paragraph, of Hor-Aha's name, would yield something along the lines of: "Hor(us), the Fighter", or "the Warrior Hor(us)". Don't forget, his name is really, Ancient Egyptian language: "Hor(us)-Aha", pronounced as the people pronounced it. (I would assume the word "warrior" is implied in his choice of names, maybe related to the conditions, his birth-rite, or his predilections.) (from the SonoranDesert of ArizonaUSA...--Mmcannis (talk) 01:09, 9 October 2008 (UTC) 1. Is it not a mistake to include the Horus element in the pharaoh's name? The royal name was made up of two elements: (1) the Horus-name and (2) the nbtwy-name. Both elements are rarely found together (for example, the Turin and Abydos king lists only show the nbtwy-names for the earliest dynasties). But it is certainly not Egyptological convention to include the prefix when discussing the names of pharaohs. Otherwise, the name of Narmer should be Hor(us)-Narmer, Djer - Hor(us)-Djer etc. In any e...

    The current reference to Hor-Aha's father in the Infobox should be removed. While mainstream Egyptological consensus agrees that Hor-Aha was preceded as pharaoh by Narmer / Menes, where is the evidence that Narmer was his father? Even on the assumption that Hor-Aha is the second pharaoh, and Narmer / Menes the first pharaoh of Dynasty I (i.e. the same dynasty and therefore presumably the same family), might Narmer not be Hor-Aha's uncle, brother, a more distant kinsman or even someone utterly unrelated? In any event, the referenceused to support the claim that Hor-Aha's mother was Neithhotep is merely speculative about Narmer being her husband. Certainly, without a clear reference supporting the claim, the Fatherfield of the Infobox should be left blank. It would be better to discuss possible genealogies and pharaonic succession in the main text and leave speculative conclusions out of the Infobox. 1. I agree. Infoboxes can be dangerous, they at times take complex information and si...

    The late prof. WB Emery points out that no artifacts definitely dating to Narmer have yet been found further north than Tarkhan. Narmer probably died before the final conquest of the north. Also that Hor Aha had a large tomb at both Abydos and Sakkara but Narmer had only a modest tomb at Abydos. Clearly HorAha had access to greater resources than Narmer and seems to have stronger claim to be the first pharaoh. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 212.93.199.154 (talk) 12:48, 9 June 2010 (UTC) As you know Emery's research is quite old and mayny discoveries have been made since. Narmer is acutally better attested than Hor-Aha (in that we have more artifacts bearing his name than Hor-Aha's) and artifacts with Narmer's name have now been found as north as the Southern Levant. Besides, Den and Qa'a king lists (http://xoomer.virgilio.it/francescoraf/hesyra/Egyptgallery03.html) dating to the first dynasty, both identify Narmer as the founder of the dynasty, with Hor-Aha second. I believe t...

    Sorry to repeat this again but I forgot to sign the earlier entry. The late prof. WB Emery, in his book “Archaic Egypt”, plausibly points out that no constructions definitely dating to Narmer have yet been found further north than Tarkhan and that Narmer probably died before the final conquest of the north. Hor-Aha had large tombs at both Abydos and Sakkara but Narmer had only a modest tomb at Abydos. Clearly Hor-Aha had access to greater resources than Narmer and seems to have the stronger claim to be the first pharaoh. Prof emery also translated "Menes" as meaning "Established" which may also strengthen the suggestion of Hor-Aha as the first pharaoh.AT Kunene (talk) 15:22, 16 January 2011 (UTC) See my response above: Emery's research is very old and recent evidence clearly identifies Narmer as the founder of the dynasty. In particular Den and Qa'a king lists, both dating to the first dynasty and explicitely giving Narmer first, Hor-Aha second. Finally, "Menes" is now believed to b...

    I tagged three statements attributed to Manetho, which I could not find in my copy of Manetho -- Waddell's translation for the Loeb Classical Library. In the surviving fragments of Manetho, there is no mention of a Pharaoh Hor-Aha. In his account of the First Dynasty the second ruler is named Athothis, whom Manetho describes was the son of Menes & a physician who wrote books on medicine, & he built the royal palace at Memphis -- the last two statements are a contrast to the retainer sacrifice associated with Hor-Aha. I don't know if experts identify Manetho's Athothis with Hor-Aha, or with another ruler of the First Dynasty, or how they think Manetho's account of the earliest rulers fit with the archeological evidence. But these statements attributed to Manetho are embarrassingly inaccurate as they stand, & if no citation is found for them they should be removed. -- llywrch (talk) 06:29, 8 September 2014 (UTC)

    This page is in Category:Deaths due to hippopotamus attacks, but this does not appear anywhere in the article.-Ich (talk)16:03, 15 June 2015 (UTC) There's nothing to suggest Hor Aha was killed by a hippo, unless you a) give credence to Manetho's report that Menes was killed by a hippo, and b) give credence to a minority of theorists who connect Menes with Aha. The category can be safely removed I would say. 172.56.35.184 (talk) 17:19, 15 June 2015 (UTC) 1. Agreed. I'll remove that category.--WANAX (talk) 10:44, 18 June 2015 (UTC)

    reign = c. 3125 BC reign = c. 3125 BC 1. Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format and provide a reliable source if appropriate. Cannolis (talk) 00:21, 15 July 2020 (UTC)

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  4. ro.wikipedia.org › wiki › Hor-AhaHor-Aha - Wikipedia

    Ținând cont de această realitate, T. Wilkinson scria că începând cu domnia lui Aha putem vorbi de existența sistematică a „analelor“, autorul referindu-se la etichete. În conformitate cu uzanța epocii, se cunoaște numai numele - Horus al faraonului, adică Aha, având semnificația de „Luptătorul“. Unii egiptologi au ...

  5. af.wikipedia.org › wiki › Hor-AhaHor-Aha - Wikipedia

    • Identiteit
    • Bewind
    • Familie
    • Grafkelder
    • Bronne

    Naam

    Vir die 1ste Dinastie word die Horusnaam, ’n deel van koninklike name wat met die god Horus verbind word, in argeologiese rekords gebruik, terwyl die historiese koningslyste ’n alternatiewe naam, die Nebtynaam, gebruik. Die name is dikwels saam gebruik, maar baiekeer apart.Die naam Hor-Aha is die farao se Horusnaam. ’n Meer volledige vorm is Horus-Aha, wat "Horus die Vegter" beteken. Die meeste Egiptoloë volg die bevindings van Petrie dat Hor-Aha (argeologies) se Nebtynaam Ity(histories) was....

    Teorieë

    Daar is ’n effense omstredenheid oor Hor-Aha. Sommige glo hy is dieselfde persoon as die legendariese Menes en dat hy Bo- en Benede-Egipteverenig het. Ander dink hy was die seun van Narmer, wat ook Menes genoem is en wat Egipte verenig het. Daar word egter algemeen aanvaar dat Narmer die farao is wat Egipte verenig het en dat Hor-Aha sy seun en erfgenaam was.

    Volgens die Egiptiese historikus Manetho het Hor-Aha op sowat 30 farao geword en het hy 60 jaar lank regeer. Dit lyk of hy baie godsdienstige bedrywighede gehad het. ’n Besoek aan ’n altaar van die godin Neith is op verskeie tablette uit sy bewind aangeteken. Die altaar was in die Nyldelta by die stad Saïs. Daar is ook melding gemaak van die god Sekerop ’n tablet wat uit sy bewind dateer. Inskripsies uit die grakelders van Hor-Aha en Neithhotep dui daarop dat die koningin tydens sy bewind dood is. Hy het haar in ’n manjifieke mastaba laat begrawe wat deur Jacques de Morgan opgegrawe is.Sy was moontlik Hor-Aha se ma. ’n Inskripsie op ’n ivoortablet van Abydos dui daarop dat Hor-Aha ’n veldtog teen die Nubiërsgelei het. ’n Sekere jaar op ’n tablet word spesifiek genoem die "Jaar waarin Ta-Sety (Nubië) verslaan is". Dit lyk of handel met die Suid-Levanttydens sy bewind afgeneem het. Anders as sy voorganger se naam, word syne nie genoem buite die Nylvallei nie.

    Hor-Aha se hoofvrou was Benerib, wie se naam op ’n paar historiese stukke saam met syne verskyn, spesifiek in grafkelder B14 by Abydos. Dié grafkelder is reg langs Hor-Aha s'n. Hy het ook ’n ander vrou, Chenthap, gehad by wie hy die seun Djergehad het. Sy word genoem as Djer se ma op die Kaïro-annalesteen.

    Hor-Aha se grafkelder is in die dodeakker by Abydos bekend as Umm el-Qa'ab. Dit bevat drie groot kamers, B10, B15 en B19, wat reg langs Narmer se grafkelder is. ’n Treffende aspek van sy grafkelder is dat lede van sy huishouding saam met hom begrawe is. Dit is onduidelik of hulle vermoor is of selfmoord gepleeg het. Van dié mense is bediendes, dwerge en vroue. Selfs honde is saam met hom begrawe.

    Cervelló-Autuori, Josep (2003), "Narmer, Menes and the seals from Abydos", Egyptology at the dawn of the twenty-first century: proceedings of the Eighth International Congress of Egyptologists, Cai...
    Edwards, I. E. S. (1971), "The early dynastic period in Egypt", The Cambridge Ancient History, 1, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Lloyd, Alan B. (1975). Herodotus: Book II. Leiden: E.J. Brill. ISBN 90-04-04179-6.
    Schulz, Regine; Seidel, Matthias (2004). Egypt: The World of the Pharaohs. H.F.Ullmann. ISBN 978-3-8331-6000-4.
    • Identity
    • Reign
    • Family
    • Tomb
    • See Also
    • Bibliography

    Name

    The commonly used name Hor-Aha is a rendering of the pharaoh's Horus-name, an element of the royal titulary associated with the god Horus, and is more fully given as Horus-Aha meaning Horus the Fighter. The Greek historian Manetho's record "Aegyptiaca" (translating to History of Egypt) lists his Greek name as Athothis, or "Athotís".For the Early Dynastic Period, the archaeological record refers to the pharaohs by their Horus-names, while the historical record, as evidenced in the Turin and Ab...

    Theories

    There has been some controversy about Hor-Aha. Some believe him to be the same individual as the legendary Menes and that he was the one to unify all of Egypt. Others claim he was the son of Narmer, the pharaoh who unified Egypt. Narmer and Menes may have been one pharaoh, referred to with more than one name. Regardless, considerable historical evidence from the period points to Narmer as the pharaoh who first unified Egypt (see Narmer Palette) and to Hor-Aha as his son and heir.

    Successor to Narmer

    Seal impressions discovered by G. Dreyer in the Umm el-Qa'ab from Den and Qa'a burials identify Hor-Aha as the second pharaoh of the first dynasty. His predecessor Narmerhad united Upper Egypt and Lower Egypt into a single kingdom. Hor-Aha probably ascended the throne in the late 32nd or early 31st century.

    Interior policy

    Hor-Aha seems to have conducted many religious activities. A visit to a shrine of the goddess Neith is recorded on several tablets from his reign. The sanctuary of Neith he visited was located in the north-east of the Nile Delta at Sais. Furthermore, the first known representation of the sacred Henu-bark of the god Sekerwas found engraved on a year tablet dating from his reign. Vessel inscriptions, labels and sealings from the graves of Hor-Aha and Queen Neithhotep suggest that this queen die...

    Economic development

    Few artifacts remain of Hor-Aha's reign. However, the finely executed copper-axe heads, faience vessel fragments,ivory box and inscribed white marbles all testify to the flourishing of craftsmanship during Aha's time in power.

    Hor-Aha's chief wife was Benerib, whose name was "written alongside his on a number of [historical] pieces, in particular, from tomb B14 at Abydos, Egypt". Tomb B14 is located directly adjacent to Hor-Aha's sepulchre. Hor-Aha also had another wife, Khenthap,with whom he became father of Djer. She is mentioned as Djer's mother on the Cairo Annals Stone.

    The tomb of Hor-Aha is located in the necropolis of the kings of the 1st Dynasty at Abydos, known as the Umm el-Qa'ab. It comprises three large chambers (designated B10, B15, and B19), which are directly adjacent to Narmer's tomb.The chambers are rectangular, directly dug in the desert floor, their walls lined with mud bricks. The tombs of Narmer and Ka had only two adjacent chambers, while the tomb of Hor-Aha comprises three substantially larger yet separated chambers. The reason for this architecture is that it was difficult at that time to build large ceilings above the chambers, as timber for these structures often had to be imported from Palestine. A striking innovation of Hor-Aha's tomb is that members of the royal household were buried with the pharaoh, the earliest known retainer sacrificesin Egypt. It is unclear if they were killed or committed suicide. Among those buried were servants, dwarfs, women and even dogs. A total of 36 subsidiary burials were laid out in three par...

    Ancient Egypt
    Ancient Egyptian retainer sacrifices
    First dynasty of Egypt
    History of Egypt
    Cervelló-Autuori, Josep (2003). "Egyptology at the dawn of the twenty-first century: proceedings of the Eighth International Congress of Egyptologists, Cairo, 2000". The American University in Cair...
    Edwards, I. E. S. (1971). "The Cambridge Ancient History". Cambridge University Press..
    Lloyd, Alan B. (1994) [1975]. Herodotus: Book II. Leiden: E. J. Brill. ISBN 90-04-04179-6. https://books.google.com/books?id=GQ7e1nuD9tcC.
    Schulz, Regine; Seidel, Matthias (2004). Egypt: The World of the Pharaohs. H.F. Ullmann. ISBN 978-3-8331-6000-4.
  6. sh.wikipedia.org › wiki › Hor-AhaHor-Aha - Wikipedia

    Hor-Aha je bio drugi po redu faraon I. dinastije Drevnog Egipta. Živio je oko 31. vijeka pne.. Oko 32. vijeka pne. je njegov otac Narmer ujedinio Gornji Egipat i Donji Egipat. Faraonom je postao u dobi od oko 30 godina te vladao do dobi od oko 62 godine. Legenda kaže da ga je odnio nilski konj, inkarnacija boga Setha .

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