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  1. Journey to the West - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Journey_to_the_West

    Journey to the West (Chinese: 西遊記; pinyin: Xī Yóu Jì) is a Chinese novel published in the 16th century during the Ming dynasty and attributed to Wu Cheng'en. It is one of the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature. It has been described as arguably the most popular literary work in East Asia.

    • c. 1592 (print)
    • Ming China
  2. Journey to the West | Author, Summary, Characters, & Facts ...

    www.britannica.com › topic › Journey-to-the-West

    Journey to the West, Chinese (Pinyin) Xiyouji or (Wade-Giles romanization) Hsi-yu chi, foremost Chinese comic novel, written by Wu Cheng’en, a novelist and poet of the Ming dynasty (1368–1644). The novel is based on the actual 7th-century pilgrimage of the Buddhist monk Xuanzang (602–664) to India in search of sacred texts.

  3. The Journey to the West Analysis - eNotes.com

    www.enotes.com › topics › journey-west

    The Journey to the West is a classic of Chinese literature which details the adventures of a Buddhist monk, Tripitaka T’ang, who travels to India to bring sacred scriptures of Buddhism back to...

  4. Journey to the West: The endlessly remade Chinese folk tale ...

    www.bbc.com › news › world-asia-china-39728636

    Apr 28, 2017 · Almost everyone with a Chinese background has grown up learning the folktale Journey to the West, the story of an epic pilgrimage of a Buddhist monk and his three disciples, the legendary monkey...

  5. 'Journey to the West' is an epic tale of the journey of the monk Xuanzang and is one of the most influential works in Chinese literature. It is a large, complicated text that incorporates various...

    • 7 min
  6. Journey to the West | Journey to the West Wiki | Fandom

    journeytothewest.fandom.com › wiki › Journey_to_the_West
    • Authorship
    • Historical Context
    • Synopsis
    • Sequels
    • Notable English-Language Translations
    • Media Adaptations

    The four protagonists, from left to right: Sun Wukong, Tang Sanzang (on the White Dragon Horse), Zhu Bajie, and Sha Wujing Journey to the West was thought to have been written and published anonymously by Wu Cheng'en in the 16th century. Hu Shih, literary scholar and then Ambassador to the United States, wrote that the people of Wu's hometown attributed it early on to Wu, and kept records to that effect as early as 1625; thus, claimed Ambassador Hu, Journey to the West was one of the earliest Chinese novels for which the authorship is officially documented. Recent scholarship casts doubts on this attribution. Brown University Chinese literature scholar David Lattimore states: "The Ambassador's confidence was quite unjustified. What the gazetteer says is that Wu wrote something called The Journey to the West. It mentions nothing about a novel. The work in question could have been any version of our story, or something else entirely." Translator W.J.F. Jenner points out that although...

    The novel Journey to the West was based on historical events. Xuanzang (602 - 664) was a monk at Jingtu Temple in late-Sui Dynasty and early-Tang Dynasty Chang'an. Motivated by the poor quality of Chinese translations of Buddhist scripture at the time, Xuanzang left Chang'an in 629, in defiance of Emperor Taizong of Tang's ban on travel. Helped by sympathetic Buddhists, he traveled via Gansu and Qinghai to Kumul (Hami), thence following the Tian Shan mountains to Turpan. He then crossed what are today Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, and Afghanistan, into Gandhara, reaching India in 630. Xuanzang traveled throughout the Indian subcontinent for the next thirteen years, visiting important Buddhist pilgrimage sites, studying at the ancient university at Nalanda, and debating the rivals of Buddhism. Xuanzang left India in 643 and arrived back in Chang'an in 646. Although he had defied the imperial travel ban when he left, Xuanzang received a warm welcome from Emperor Taizong upon his return. The...

    The novel has 100 chapters that can be divided into four unequal parts. The first part, which includes chapters 1–7, is a self-contained introduction to the main story. It deals entirely with the earlier exploits of Sun Wukong, a monkey born from a stone nourished by the Five Elements, who learns the art of the Tao, 72 polymorphic transformations, combat, and secrets of immortality, and through guile and force makes a name for himself, Qitian Dasheng (simplified Chinese: 齐天大圣; traditional Chinese: 齊天大聖), or "Great Sage Equal to Heaven". His powers grow to match the forces of all of the Eastern (Taoist) deities, and the prologue culminates in Sun's rebellion against Heaven, during a time when he garnered a post in the celestial bureaucracy. Hubris proves his downfall when the Buddha manages to trap him under a mountain, sealing it with a talisman for five hundred years.18th-century Chinese illustration of a scene from Journey to the WestAn illustrated edition of the story The second...

    The brief satirical novel Xiyoubu (西游补, "A Supplement to the Journey to the West", c. 1640) follows Sun Wukong as he is trapped in a magical dream world created by the Qing Fish Demon, the embodiment of desire (情, qing). Sun travels back and forth through time, during which he serves as the adjunct King of Hell and judges the soul of the recently dead traitor Qin Hui during the Song dynasty, takes on the appearance of a beautiful concubine and causes the downfall of the Qin dynasty, and even faces Pāramitā, one of his five sons born to the rakshasa Princess Iron Fan, on the battlefield during the Tang dynasty. The events of Xiyoubu take place between the end of chapter 61 and the beginning of chapter 62 of Journey to the West. The author, Dong Yue (董說), wrote the book because he wanted to create an opponent—in this case desire—that Sun could not defeat with his great strength and martial skill.

    Monkey: A Folk-Tale of China (1942), an abridged translation by Arthur Waley. For many years, the most well-known translation available in English. The Waley translation has also been published as...

    Main article: List of media adaptations of Journey to the West In 1986, the novel was made into a TV series by Yang Jie and soon became popular with highly regarded performances by actors such as Liu Xiao Ling Tong, Ma Dehua and others. It follows the original novel faithfully and is widely regarded as a classic. This TV series was first aired in 1986 and still airs in many countries, enjoying wide popularity. Aside from this, the 2010 video game Enslaved: Odysseyto the West was loosely based on the story, featuring a man named "Monkey" accompanying a female engineer named Trip on a journey across a post-apocalypse North America. The manga series Dragon Balland its main character, Son Goku, were originally loosely based on the story. The Genesis Unit from the Wily Tower game mode in Mega Man: The Wily Warsare loosely based on the main characters from Journey to the West. Buster Rod G is based on Sun Wukong, Hyper Storm H is based on Zhu Wuneng, and Mega Water S is based on Sha Wining.

  7. Journey to the West | Dragon Ball Wiki | Fandom

    dragonball.fandom.com › wiki › Journey_to_the_West
    • Overview
    • Main Characters
    • List of Demons
    • Notable English-Language Translations
    • Media Adaptations
    • External Links

    The novel is a fictionalized account of the legends around the Buddhist monk Xuánzàng's pilgrimage to India during the Táng dynasty in order to obtain Buddhist religious texts called sutras. On instruction from the Buddha, the Bodhisattva Kuan Yin|Guānyīn gives this task to the monk and his three protectors in the form of disciples: namely Sūn Wùkōng, Zhū Bājiè and Shā Wùjìng; together with a dragon prince who acts as Xuánzàng's horse mount. These four characters have agreed to help Xuánzàng as an atonement for past sins. Some scholars propose that the book satirizes the effete Chinese government at the time. Journey to the Westhas a strong background in Chinese folk religion, Chinese mythology and value systems; the pantheon of Taoist deities and Buddhist bodhisattvas is still reflective of Chinese folk religious beliefs today. Part of the novel's enduring popularity comes from the fact that it works on multiple levels: it is a first-rate adventure story, a dispenser of spiritual i...

    Tripitaka or Xuánzàng

    Xuánzàng (玄奘) (or Táng-Sānzàng (唐三藏), meaning "Táng-dynasty monk" — Sānzàng (三藏) or "Three Baskets", referring to the Tripitaka, was a traditional honorific for a Buddhist monk) is the Buddhist monk who set out to India to retrieve the Buddhist scriptures for China. He is called Tripitakain many English versions of the story. Although he is helpless when it comes to defending himself, the bodhisattva Guānyīn helps by finding him powerful disciples (Sūn Wùkōng, Zhū Bājiè, and Shā Wùjìng) who a...

    Monkey King or Sūn Wùkōng

    Sūn Wùkōng (孫悟空) is the name given to this character by his teacher, Patriarch Subhuti, and means "Monkey Awakened to Emptiness". He is called Sūn Xíngzhě (孫行者, Son Gyouja) by Xuánzàng (with most adaptations still having him named as "Wukong" by Xuánzàng). While he is commonly known as Monkey King in pop culture, with one of his more egotistical titles being the Handsome Monkey King (美猴王, Měi Hóuwáng/Bikō'ō) in English. He is by far, the novel's most iconic character. He was born out of a roc...

    Zhū Bājiè

    Zhū Bājiè (豬八戒; lit. "Pig of the Eight Commandments") is also known as Zhū Wùnéng (豬悟能; lit. "Pig Awakened to Ability"), and given the name Pigsy, Piggy or Pigin English. Once an immortal who was the Tiānpéng Yuánshuǎi (天蓬元帥; lit. "Field Marshal Tianpeng") of 100,000 soldiers of the Milky Way, during a celebration of gods, he drank too much and attempted to flirt with Cháng'é, the beautiful moon goddess, resulting in his banishment into the mortal world. He was supposed to be reborn as a huma...

    There are many demons in the story. Examples are listed below: 1. Black-Bear-Demon (pinyin: Hēixióngguài) 2. Yellow Wind Demon (Huángfēngguài) 3. Zhen Yuan Holy Man (He is not a demon, but an immortal, who got annoyed by those disciples who stole his precious immortal-fruits (Ginseng Fruits, 人参果).) 4. White-Bone-Demon (pinyin: Báigǔjīng) 5. Yellow Robe Demon (pinyin: Huángpáoguài) 6. Gold-Horn and Silver-Horn (pinyin: Jīnjiǎo and Yínjiǎo) 7. Red-Boy a.k.a. Holy Baby King (pinyin: Hóng-hái'ér; Japanese: Kōgaiji) 8. Tiger Power, Deer Power and Goat (or Antelope) Power 9. Black River Dragon Demon (Hēi Shǔi Hé Yuan Lóng Gài) 10. Carp Demon (Li Yu Jīng) 11. Green-Ox-Demon (pinyin: Qīngniújīng) 12. Scorpion-Demon (pinyin: Xiēzijīng) 13. Six Ear Monkey Demon (a.k.a Fake Sun Wukong, Lìuěrmíhóu) 14. Ox-Demon-King (pinyin: Niúmówáng; Japanese: Gyūmaō): The inspiration for the Ox King, who also shares the same name in the Asian scripts/dubs as the original Ox-Demon-King. 15. Demon Woman (Luo C...

    Monkey: A Folk-Tale of China (1942), an abridged translation by Arthur Waley. For many years, the best translation available in English; it only translates thirty out of the hundred chapters. (Peng...
    Journey to the West, a complete translation by W.J.F. Jenner published by the Foreign Languages Press in Beijing 1955 (three volumes; 1982/1984 edition: ISBN 0-8351-1003-6, ISBN 0-8351-1193-8, ISBN...
    The Journey to the West (1977–1983), a complete translation in four volumes by Anthony C. Yu. University of Chicago Press: HC ISBN 0-226-97145-7, ISBN 0-226-97146-5, ISBN 0-226-97147-3, ISBN 0-226-...

    Stage

    1. Journey to the West: The Musical: A stage musical which received its world premiere at the New York Musical Theatre Festival on September 25, 2006. 2. Monkey: Journey to the West: A stage musical version created by Chen Shi-zheng, Damon Albarn (frontman of British rock band Blur) and Jamie Hewlett, the latter two better known as creators of the Gorillaz musical project. It premiered as part of the 2007 Manchester International Festival at the Palace Theatre on June 28. 3. The Monkey King:...

    Film

    1. A Chinese Odysseyby Stephen Chow. 2. A Chinese Tall Story: 2005 live action movie starring Nicholas Tse as Xuánzàng. 3. Heavenly Legend: A 1998 film by Tai Seng Entertainment starring Kung Fu kid Sik Siu Loong is partially based on this legend. 4. Monkey Goes West: The Shaw Brothers' 1966 Hong Kong film (Cantonese: Sau yau gei). Also known as "Monkey with 72 Magic" 5. The Forbidden Kingdom: 2008 live action movie starring Jackie Chan and Jet Li which is said to be based on the Legend of th...

    Live-action television

    1. Monkey (1978–1980): A well-known 1970s Japanese television series based on Journey to the Westtranslated into English by the BBC. 2. Journey to the West(1986): A TV series produced by CCTV. 3. Journey to the West(1996): A popular series produced by Hong Kong studio TVB, starring Dicky Cheung. 4. Journey to the West II (1998): The sequel to TVB's Journey to the Westseries, starring Benny Chan. 5. The Monkey King (2001): Sci Fi Channel's TV adaptation of this legend, also called The Lost Emp...

    Inspirations of Dragon Ballat fullpowerdbz.com
    Journey to the West - Freeware complete English text version in PDF format (2.56MB). From Chine Informations
  8. Journey to the West: Volume I Summary and Study Guide ...

    www.supersummary.com › journey-to-the-west › summary

    The Journey to the West: Volume I (1983), translated and edited by Anthony C. Yu, contains the first 25 chapters of a 100-chapter hero’s epic, an allegory designed to impart knowledge on how to behave and what values to extol.

  9. The Journey to the West Themes - eNotes.com

    www.enotes.com › topics › journey-west

    Jul 21, 2020 · Discussion of themes and motifs in Wu Chengen's The Journey to the West. eNotes critical analyses help you gain a deeper understanding of The Journey to the West so you can excel on your essay or ...

  10. What is the best English translation of Journey to the West ...

    www.quora.com › What-is-the-best-English

    I have looked at all of them. Yes, Anthony Wu has a good and more scholarly translation, but the one that I found most fun to read was Arthur Waley’s version (originally published in 1942), just called Monkey.

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