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  1. Columbia Records | Pop Culture Wiki | Fandom

    pop-culture.fandom.com/wiki/Columbia_Records
    • Beginnings
    • Columbia Ownership Separation
    • CBS Takes Over
    • The LP Record
    • The 1950s
    • The 1960s
    • The 1970s
    • The 1980s and Sale to Sony
    • The 1990s and Today

    The Columbia Phonograph Company was founded in 1887 by stenographer, lawyer and New Jersey native Edward Easton (1856–1915) and a group of investors. It derived its name from the District of Columbia, where it was headquartered. At first it had a local monopoly on sales and service of Edison phonographs and phonograph cylinders in Washington, D.C., Maryland and Delaware. As was the custom of some of the regional phonograph companies, Columbia produced many commercial cylinder recordings of its own, and its catalogue of musical records in 1891 was 10 pages. Columbia's ties to Edison and the North American Phonograph Company were severed in 1894 with the North American Phonograph Company's breakup. Thereafter it sold only records and phonographs of its own manufacture. In 1902, Columbia introduced the "XP" record, a molded brown wax record, to use up old stock. Columbia introduced "black wax" records in 1903, and, according to Tim Gracyk, continued to mold brown waxes until 1904; the...

    In 1931, the British Columbia Graphophone Company (itself originally a subsidiary of American Columbia Records, then to become independent, actually went on to purchase its former parent, American Columbia, in late 1929) merged with the Gramophone Company to form Electric & Musical Industries Ltd. (EMI). EMI was forced to sell its American Columbia operations (because of anti-trust concerns) to the Grigsby-Grunow Company, makers of the Majestic Radio. But Majestic soon fell on hard times. An abortive attempt in 1932 (around the same time that Victor was experimenting with its 33Template:Fraction "program transcriptions") was the "Longer Playing Record", a finer-grooved 10" 78 with 4:30 to 5:00 playing time per side. Columbia issued about eight of these (in the 18000-D series), as well as a short-lived series of double-grooved "Longer Playing Record"s on its Clarion Records, Harmony and Velvet Tonelabels. All of these experiments (and indeed the Clarion, Harmony and Velvet Tone label...

    In 1938 ARC, including the Columbia label in the USA, was bought by William S. Paley of the Columbia Broadcasting System for US$750,000. (Columbia Records had originally co-founded CBS in 1927 along with New York talent agent Arthur Judson, but soon cashed out of the partnership leaving only the name; Paley acquired the fledgling radio network in 1928.) CBS revived the Columbia label in place of Brunswick and the Okeh label in place of Vocalion. CBS renamed the company Columbia Recording Corporation and retained control of all of ARC's past masters, but in a complicated move, the pre-1931 Brunswick and Vocalion masters, as well as trademarks of Brunswick and Vocalion, reverted to Warner Bros. (who had leased their whole recording operation to ARC in early 1932) and Warners sold the lot to Decca Recordsin 1941. The Columbia trademark from this point until the late 1950s was two overlapping circles with the Magic Notes in the left circle and a CBS microphone in the right circle. The R...

    Columbia's president Edward Wallerstein, instrumental in steering Paley to the ARC purchase, at this time set his talents to the goal (as he saw it) of hearing an entire movement of a symphony on one side of an album. Ward Botsford writing for the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Issue of High Fidelity Magazine relates, "He was no inventor—he was simply a man who seized an idea whose time was ripe and begged, ordered, and cajoled a thousand men into bringing into being the now accepted medium of the record business." Despite Wallerstein's stormy tenure, in 1948 Columbia introduced the Long Playing "microgroove" LP record format (sometimes written "Lp" in early advertisements), which rotated at 33⅓ revolutions per minute, to be the standard for the gramophone record for half a century. CBS research director Dr. Peter Goldmark played a managerial role in the collaborative effort, but Wallerstein credits engineer William Savorywith the technical prowess that brought the long-playing disc to th...

    In 1951, Columbia USA began issuing records in the 45 rpm format RCA had introduced two years earlier. Also in 1951, Ted Wallerstein retired as Columbia Records chairman; also, Columbia USA severed its decades-long distribution arrangement with EMI and signed a distribution deal with Philips Records to market Columbia recordings outside North America.EMI continued to distribute Okeh and later Epic label recordings until 1968. EMI also continued to distribute Columbia recordings in Australia and New Zealand. American Columbia was not happy with EMI's reluctance to introduce long playing records. Columbia became the most successful non-rock record company in the 1950s when it lured impresario Mitch Miller away from the Mercury label (Columbia remained largely uninterested in the teenage rock market until the early 1960s, despite a handful of crossover hits). Miller quickly signed on Mercury's biggest artist at the time, Frankie Laine, and discovered several of the decade's biggest rec...

    Template:See also In 1961, CBS ended its arrangement with Philips Records and formed its own international organization, CBS Records, in 1962, which released Columbia recordings outside the USA and Canada on the CBS label (until 1964 marketed by Philips in Britain). The recordings could not be released under the "Columbia Records" name because EMI operated a separate record labelby that name outside North America. (This was the result of the legal maneuvers which had led to the creation of EMI in the early 1930s.) Columbia's Mexican unit, Discos Columbia, was renamed Discos CBS. With the formation of CBS Records International, it started establishing its own distribution in the early 1960s beginning in Australia. In 1960 CBS took over its distributor in Australia and New Zealand, the Australian Record Company (founded in 1936) including Coronet Records, one of the leading Australian independent recording and distribution companies of the day. The CBS Coronet label was replaced by th...

    In September 1970, under the guidance of Clive Davis, Columbia Records entered the West Coast rock market with a vengeance, both opening a state-of-the art recording studio (CBS recording studio, 827 Folsom St, San Francisco, later the Automatt) and establishing an A&R head and office in San Francisco at Fisherman's Wharf, headed by ex Nils Lofgren and Roy Buchanan bandmate, Monument records artist and producer George Daly. The recording studio operated under CBS until 1978. During the early 1970s, Columbia began recording in a four-channel process called quadraphonic, using the "SQ" (Stereo Quadraphonic) standard which used an electronic encoding process that could be decoded by special amplifiers and then played through four speakers, with each speaker placed in the corner of a room. Remarkably, RCA countered with another quadraphonic process which required a special cartridge to play the "discrete" recordings for four-channel playback. Both Columbia and RCA's quadraphonic records...

    The structure of US Columbia remained the same until 1980, when it spun off the classical/Broadway unit, Columbia Masterworks Records, into a separate imprint, CBS Masterworks Records(now Sony Classical). In 1988, the CBS Records Group, including the Columbia Records unit, was acquired by Sony, which re-christened the parent division Sony Music Entertainment in 1991. As Sony only had a temporary license on the CBS Records name, it then acquired the rights to the Columbia trademarks (Columbia Graphophone) outside the U.S., Canada, Spain (trademark owned by BMG) and Japan (Nippon Columbia) from EMI, which generally had not been used by them since the early 1970s. The CBS Records label was officially renamed Columbia Records on January 1, 1991 worldwide except Spain (where Sony acquired the rights by 2004) and Japan. CBS Masterworks Records was renamed Sony Classical Records. In December 2006, CBS Corporation revived the CBS Records name for a new minor label closely linked with its te...

    Columbia Records remains a premier subsidiary label of Sony Music Entertainment. The label is headed by chairman Rob Stringer, along with executive vice president and general manager Joel Klaiman, who joined the label in December 2012. In 2009, during the re-consolidation of Sony Music, Columbia was partnered with its Epic Records sister to form the Columbia/Epic Label Groupunder which it operated as an imprint. In July 2011, as part of further corporate restructuring, Epic was split from the Columbia/Epic Group as Epic took in multiple artists from Jive Records. As of March 2013, Columbia Records is home to 90 artists such as Robbie Williams, Calvin Harris, and Daft Punk.

  2. In September 1970, under the guidance of Clive Davis, Columbia Records entered the West Coast rock market with a vengeance, both opening a state-of-the art recording studio (CBS recording studio, 827 Folsom St, San Francisco, later the Automatt) and establishing an A&R head and office in San Francisco at Fisherman's Wharf, headed by ex Nils ...

    • 1887; 131 years ago (until 1894 as a subsidiary of the North American Phonograph Company)
    • Sony Music Entertainment, (Outside the US), Legacy Recordings (re-issues)
  3. In September 1970, under the guidance of Clive Davis, Columbia Records entered the West Coast rock market, opening a state-of-the art recording studio (which was located at 827 Folsom St. in San Francisco and later morphed into the Automatt) and establishing an A&R head and office in San Francisco at Fisherman's Wharf, headed by George Daly, a ...

  4. Columbia Records - yourwalkinfo.blogspot.com

    yourwalkinfo.blogspot.com/.../columbia-records.html

    Jan 17, 2018 · In New York City, Columbia Records had some of the most highly regarded sound recording studios, including the Columbia 30th Street Studio at 207 East 30th Street ("Studio C" and "Studio D"), the CBS Studio Building at 49 East 52nd Street ("Studio B" on the second floor and "Studio E" on the sixth floor), and one of their earliest recording ...

  5. In September 1970, under the guidance of Clive Davis, Columbia Records entered the West Coast rock market, opening a state-of-the art recording studio (which was located at 827 Folsom St. in San Francisco and later morphed into the Automatt) and establishing an A&R head and office in San Francisco at Fisherman's Wharf, headed by George Daly, a ...

    • U.S.
    • Sony Music Entertainment, Legacy Recordings (reissues)
  6. Columbia Records : definition of Columbia Records and ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/Columbia Records/en-en

    In New York City, Columbia Records had some of the most highly respected sound recording studios, including the Columbia 30th Street Studio at 207 East 30th Street ("Studio C" and "Studio D"), the CBS Studio Building at 49 East 52nd Street ("Studio B" on the second floor and "Studio E" on the sixth floor), and one of their earliest recording ...

  7. Columbia Records How To - 10/2020

    www.addhowto.com/columbia-records-how-to

    · Columbia records is one of the longest lasting and oldest record labels. Known as a pop, rock, and soul label, Columbia has been around since the early 1900s and is more active today than ever before, with hundreds of recording artists signed to its name.

  8. Columbia Records | Columbia Records | Gramophone Record

    pt.scribd.com/document/330938186/Columbia-Records

    In New York City, Columbia Records had some of the most highly respected sound recording studios, including the Columbia 30th Street Studio at 207 East 30th Street ("Studio C" and "Studio D"), the CBS Studio Building at 49 East 52nd Street ("Studio B" on the second floor and "Studio E" on the sixth floor), and one of their earliest recording ...

  9. Aretha Franklin | Biography, Songs, Albums, & Facts | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Aretha-Franklin

    She moved to New York City, where Columbia Records executive John Hammond, who had signed Count Basie and Billie Holiday, arranged her recording contract and supervised sessions highlighting her in a blues-jazz vein. From that first session, “Today I Sing the Blues” (1960) remains a classic.

  10. ROY SEGAL RETIRES: HEAD OF FANTASY STUDIOS, SAUL ZAENTZ FILM ...

    www.mixonline.com/recording/roy-segal-retires...

    Mar 01, 2000 · He learned remote recording at night, in clubs and at stage shows around town, knowing that he wanted to be involved with music. In 1958, he left the UN for Columbia Records, where he worked on hundreds of projects as an editor. There he was mentored by Don Puluse (later of Berklee College of Music) and soon worked his way up to engineer.

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