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  1. John of Bohemia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › John_I_of_Bohemia

    Like his predecessor Henry, he was disliked by much of the Czech nobility. John was considered to be an "alien king" and gave up the administration of Bohemia after a while and embarked on a life of travel. He parted ways with his wife and left the Czech country to be ruled by the barons while spending time in Luxembourg and the French court.

    • 1310–1346
    • Henry
  2. John of Bohemia | Historipedia Official Wiki | Fandom

    historipediaofficial.wikia.org › wiki › John_of_Bohemia

    Like his predecessor Henry, he was disliked by much of the Czech nobility. John was considered to be an "alien king" and gave up the administration of Bohemia after a while and embarked on a life of travel. He parted ways with his wife and left the Czech country to be ruled by the barons while spending time in Luxembourg and the French court.

    • 10 August 1296 Luxembourg
    • Henry VII, Holy Roman Emperor
    • 26 August 1346 (aged 50) near Crécy-en-Ponthieu
    • Margaret of Brabant
  3. John of Bohemia | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › John_of_Bohemia
    • Life
    • Problems with The Aristocracy
    • International Politics
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    Raised in Paris, John was French by education, but deeply involved in the politics of Germany. In 1310 his father arranged the marriage of the 14-year-old to Elisabeth from the Přemyslid dynasty, sister of the deceased King Wenceslaus III of Bohemia. The wedding took place in Speyer, after which the newly weds made their way to Prague accompanied by a group led by the experienced diplomat and expert on Czech issues, Peter of Aspelt, Archbishop of Mainz. Because Henry had imperial regiments accompany and protect the couple from Nuremberg to Prague the Czech forces were able to gain control of Prague and depose the reigning King Henry of Carinthia on December 3, 1310. The Castle at Prague was uninhabitable so John made residence in one of the houses on the Old Town Square and with the help of his advisors he stabilized affairs in the Czech state. He thereby became one of the seven prince-electors of the Holy Roman Empire and – in succession of Wenceslaus III – claimant to the Polish a...

    One of John of Luxembourg’s first steps as king was the re-establishment of authority and to secure peace within the country. In 1311 he was able to reach an agreement with the Bohemian and Moravian aristocracy which is referred to as the “inaugural diplomas” with which John restricted the relations of both the ruler and aristocracy. The aristocracy was however allowed to hold the right to elect the king, to decide the matter of extraordinary taxation, the right to their property, and the right to choose freely whether or not to offer military support to the king in foreign wars. Although the aristocracy was encouraged to raise armies when peace within the country was threatened. On the other hand the king’s right to appoint a foreign official to office was abolished. John structured these agreements in order to provide a basis for the consolidation of the ruler’s power within the Bohemian kingdom. The agreements weren’t as successful as John intended. The aristocracy did not intend...

    The international spectrum was further broadened for John when his father named him Vicar General, his deputy for the governance of the Empire. This allowed for John to reach further and he was able to contribute to the imperial coronation along with helping with the conclusion of the Italian territorial wars. In 1313 Henry died suddenly bringing an end to this collaboration between him and John. However, through Henry’s death a spot for the imperial crown opened up making John a possible candidate. The other two candidates being Fredrick of the Hapsburgs and Ludwig of Bavaria. In attempts to not support Fredrick John voted for Ludwig at the diet of electors. In return for his support Ludwig, as the new imperial king, promised the support in territorial claims of the Czech state in Silesia and Meissen as well as the region of Cheb and the Upper Palatinate. Later in 1319, after the Brandenburg House of Ascania died out, John regained control over the Bautzen region and then the Görli...

    The body of John the Blind was moved to Kloster Altmünster ("Old-Minster Abbey") in Luxembourg. When the abbey was destroyed in 1543 the corpse was moved to Kloster Neumünster ("New-Minster Abbey") in Luxembourg. During the confusion of the French Revolution the mortal remains were salvaged by the Boch industrialist family (founders of Villeroy & Boch, ennobled in 1892) and hidden in an attic room in Mettlachon the Saar River. The legend has it that the monks of the abbey asked Pierre-Joseph Boch for this favor. His son Jean-François Boch met with Prince Frederick William of Prussia on his voyage through the Rhineland in 1833 offering the remains as a gift. As Prince Frederick considered John the Blind to be one of his ancestors he ordered Karl Friedrich Schinkel to construct a funeral chapel. The chapel was built in 1834 and 1835 near Kastel-Staadton a rock above the town. In 1838 on the anniversary of his death John the Blind was laid in a black marble Sarcophagus in a public cere...

    According to the Cronica ecclesiae pragensis Benesii Krabice de Weitmile, before he died at the Battle of Crécy, he said: "With God's help it will never be that a Bohemian king would run from a fight!"

    He was married twice: First, to Elisabeth of Bohemia (1292–1330). In this marriage he had the following children: 1. Margaret of Bohemia (8 July 1313 – 11 July 1341, Prague), married in Straubing 12 August 1328 to Henry XIV, Duke of Bavaria. 2. Bonne (21 May 1315 – 11 September 1349, Maubuisson), married in Melun6 August 1332 to King John II of France. 3. Charles IV(14 May 1316 – 29 November 1378), King of Bohemia and Holy Roman Emperor. 4. Ottokar ("Otto") (22 November 1318 – 20 April 1320), Prince of Bohemia. 5. John Henry (Jan Jindřich) (12 February 1322, Mělník – 12 November 1375), Margraveof Moravia. 6. Anna (1323 – 3 September 1338), twin of Elizabeth, married 16 February 1335 to Otto, Duke of Austria. 7. Elizabeth (1323–1324), twin of Anna. Second (December 1334), to Beatrice of Bourbon, daughter of Louis I, Duke of Bourbon. This marriage produced one son: 1. Wenceslaus I of Luxembourg (25 February 1337 – 7 December 1383), Duke of Luxembourg and Brabant. His illegitimate son...

    Agnew, Hugh L. The Czechs and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown. Stanford: Hoover Institution Press, 2004. 30-33. Print. Neillands, Robin. The Hundred Years' War. London: Routledge, 1990. 100. Print. Teich, Mikuláš. Bohemia in History. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998. 53-55. Print. Pánek, Jaroslav, and Oldřich Tůma. A History Of The Czech Lands. Prague: Karolinum Press, 2009. 121-25. Print.

  4. John Of Bohemia Courses - XpCourse

    www.xpcourse.com › john-of-bohemia-courses

    Like his predecessor Henry, he was disliked by much of the Czech nobility. John was considered to be an "alien king" and gave up the administration of Bohemia after a while and embarked on a life of travel. He parted ways with his wife and left the Czech country to be ruled by the barons while spending time in Luxembourg and the French court..

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  5. Talk:John of Bohemia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:John_I_of_Bohemia

    His son was set up as anti-king to the Wittelsbach Louis IV in the year John died. It was more complicated, I feel, than the sentence allows. The object of the hostility of the Czech nobility, however, he gave up the administration of Bohemia and embarked on a life of travel, spending time in Luxembourg and the French court.

  6. Administration of the Empire | Western Civilization

    courses.lumenlearning.com › suny-hccc-worldhistory
    • Overview
    • The Emperor’s Loss of Centralized Authority
    • Imperial Diet
    • King of The Romans
    • Imperial Estates

    The Holy Roman Empire was not a highly centralized state like most countries today. Instead, it was divided into dozens—eventually hundreds—of individual entities governed by kings, dukes, counts, bishops, abbots, and other rulers, collectively known as princes. There were also some areas ruled directly by the emperor. At no time could the emperor simply issue decrees and govern autonomously over the empire. His power was severely restricted by the various local leaders. From the High Middle Ages onwards, the Holy Roman Empire was marked by an uneasy coexistence with the princes of the local territories who were struggling to take power away from it. To a greater extent than in other medieval kingdoms such as France and England, the Roman emperors were unable to gain much control over the lands that they formally owned. Instead, to secure their own position from the threat of being deposed, emperors were forced to grant more and more autonomy to local rulers, both nobles and bishops...

    After the reign of Otto I, the centralized power of the emperor began to fade and local rulers, as well as the Catholic Church, gained more and more power in relation to the emperor. Eventually, the emperor held little authority over the empire and the territories began to function more like modern nation-states. The Hohenstaufen dynasty, which started in 1125, and especially Emperor Frederick I, represented both a final attempt at unified power and the beginning of the dissolution of that power. Despite his imperial claims, Frederick’s rule was a major turning point towards the disintegration of central rule in the Holy Roman Empire. While concentrated on establishing a modern, centralized state in Sicily, he was mostly absent from Germany and issued far-reaching privileges to Germany’s secular and ecclesiastical princes. In the 1220 Confoederatio cum principibus ecclesiasticis, Frederick gave up a number of regalia in favor of the bishops, among them tariffs, coining, and fortific...

    The Imperial Diet (Reichstag) was the legislative body of the Holy Roman Empire and theoretically superior to the emperor himself. It was divided into three classes. The first class, the Council of Electors, consisted of the electors, or the princes who could vote for King of the Romans. The second class, the Council of Princes, consisted of the other princes, and was divided into two “benches,” one for secular rulers and one for ecclesiastical ones. Higher-ranking princes had individual votes, while lower-ranking princes were grouped into “colleges” by geography. Each college had one vote. The precise role and function of the Imperial Diet changed over the centuries, as did the empire itself, in that the estates and separate territories gained more and more control of their own affairs at the expense of imperial power.

    Another check on the emperor’s power was the fact that he was elected. A prospective emperor first had to be elected King of the Romans by the prince-electors, the highest office of the Imperial Diet. German kings had been elected since the 9th century; at that point they were chosen by the leaders of the five most important tribes (the Salian Franks of Lorraine, Ripuarian Franks of Franconia, Saxons, Bavarians, and Swabians). In the Holy Roman Empire, the main dukes and bishops of the kingdom elected the King of the Romans. In 1356, Emperor Charles IV issued the Golden Bull, which limited the electors to seven: the King of Bohemia, the Count Palatine of the Rhine, the Duke of Saxony, the Margrave of Brandenburg, and the archbishops of Cologne, Mainz, and Trier. During the Thirty Years’ War, the Duke of Bavaria and the Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg were given the right to vote as the eighth and ninth electors, respectively. Additionally, the Napoleonic Wars resulted in several electora...

    The number of territories in the empire was considerable, rising to about 300 at the time of the Peace of Westphalia. Many of these Kleinstaaten (“little states”) covered no more than a few square miles, and/or included several non-contiguous pieces, so the empire was often called a Flickenteppich(“patchwork carpet”). An entity was considered a Reichsstand(imperial estate) if, according to feudal law, it had no authority above it except the Holy Roman Emperor himself. The imperial estates comprised: 1. Territories ruled by a hereditary nobleman, such as a prince, archduke, duke, or count. 2. Territories in which secular authority was held by a clerical dignitary, such as an archbishop, bishop, or abbot. Such a cleric was a prince of the church. In the common case of a prince-bishop, this temporal territory (called a prince-bishopric) frequently overlapped with his often-larger ecclesiastical diocese, giving the bishop both civil and clerical powers. Examples are the prince-archbisho...

  7. Jean de Luxembourg, King of Bohemia - geni family tree

    www.geni.com › people › Jean-de-Luxembourg-King-of

    Mar 31, 2020 · Like his predecessor Henry the object of the hostility of the Czech nobility, "alien king" John soon gave up the administration of Bohemia and embarked on a life of travel, spending time in Luxembourg and the French court. His travels took him to Silesia, Poland, Lithuania, Tyrol, Northern Italy and Papal Avignon.

  8. Catholic Heroes… St. Agnes Of Bohemia | The Wanderer Newspaper

    thewandererpress.com › saints › catholic-heroes-st

    In 1963 it became the National Gallery — sadly with little or no recognition of its founder, the royal princess who gave up the powers of the temporal world to serve the heavenly kingdom. Pope Pius IX beatified Agnes in 1874 and she was finally canonized by Pope St. John Paul II on November 12, 1989 — five days before the fall of the ...

  9. John of Bohemia — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › John_of_Bohemia

    Like his predecessor Henry, he was disliked by much of the Czech nobility. John was considered to be an "alien king" and gave up the administration of Bohemia after a while and embarked on a life of travel. He parted ways with his wife and left the Czech country to be ruled by the barons while spending time in Luxembourg and the French court.

  10. (PDF) History of Local Self-Government and Public ...

    www.researchgate.net › publication › 270735138

    History of Local Self-Government and Public Administration in the Lands of the Bohemian Crown in Relation to Waste Management January 2015 Lex Localis 13(1):79-99

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