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  1. Al-Badr (East Pakistan) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Al-Badr_(East_Pakistan)

    The Al-Badr (Bengali: আল বদর) was a paramilitary force composed mainly of Bihari Muslims which operated in East Pakistan against the Bengali nationalist movement during the Bangladesh Liberation War, under the patronage of the Pakistani government.

    • Etymology

      The name Al-Badr means the full moon and refers to the...

    • History

      Al-Badr was constituted in September 1971 under the auspices...

    • War crimes

      Al-Badr perpetrated atrocities against civilians during the...

  2. Al-Badr (East Pakistan) - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Al-Badr_(East_Pakistan)
    • Background
    • Tasks
    • Abolition

    On March 27, 1971, after beginning the Pakistani Civil War, Pakistani military forces needed military support from Bengali nationalists supporters who still wanted to be part of Pakistan, or did not like Indian involvement in the movement; as well as the non-Bengali muhajirs in order to abolish the independence fighters of Bangladesh, the Mukti Bahini, Hemayet Bahiniand Kaderiya Bahini. The Al Badar were formed to find these independence fighters and to be guides as well as co-fighters who were familiar with the local terrain. The force was composed of madrasa students and teachers, Bengali supporters of Muslim League and Jamaat E Islami, and muhajirscoming from non-Bengali part of India. There were three type of Paramilitary forces Pakistan formed, 1.Razakars:refuges who were came from other parts of India during separation of India and Pakistan, and settled in East Pakistan. 2. Al-Badar: Bengali Muslim Students from Colleges, universities and madrasah, who were loyal to Jamat-e-is...

    The Al Badar were given a variety of combat and non-combat tasks including: 1. Taking part in the operations 2. Spying against Mukti Bahini 3. Interrogation 4. Working as the guides of the regular army 5. Assassination 6. Finding and killing Mukti Bahinisoldiers 7. Providing supply line to front army

    On 16 December 1971, Pakistan unconditionally surrendered. Members of Al-Badr, along with other Razakars, Al-Shams, and Shanti Committee also surrendered to the Mitro Bahini's. As they all were Bengali it was supposed that Bangladesh would treat them as an opposition party, that is they would arrest them and treat them as prisoners of war. However most of them were tortured, killed by Mukti Bahini, or forced into exile from Bangladesh.

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    Who was the Al-Badr in East Pakistan?

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    What did Al Shams and Al Badr stand for?

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  4. Talk:Al-Badr (East Pakistan) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:Al-Badr_(East_Pakistan)

    This is the talk page for discussing improvements to the Al-Badr (East Pakistan) article. This is not a forum for general discussion of the article's subject.: Put new text under old text.

  5. East Pakistan - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › East_Pakistan

    India. East Pakistan was the eastern provincial wing of Pakistan between 1947 and 1971, covering the territory of the modern country Bangladesh. Its land borders were with India and Burma, with a coastline on the Bay of Bengal. East Pakistanis were popularly known as "Pakistani Bengalis"; to distinguish this region from India's state West ...

    • Bengali, and English
    • Eastern provincial wing of Pakistan
  6. Al-Badr (East Pakistan) | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Al-Badr_(East_Pakistan)
    • Background
    • Organisation
    • Leaders of Al-Badr
    • Abolition
    • Allegations of War Crimes

    The name of the paramilitary formation, Al-Badr, may refer to the Battle of Badr. Together with the Razakar and Al-Shams, Al-Badr was formed in order to counter the guerrilla activities of the Mukti Bahiniwhich grew increasingly organised and militarily successful during in the second half of 1971. All three groups operated under Pakistani command,

    Citing excerpts from Hussain Haqqani’s (Pakistani diplomat) book,'Pakistan: Between Mosque and Military', journalist and researcher Azadur Rahman Chandan said in his book, The Jamaat-e-Islami and especially its student wing,the Islami Jamiat-e-Talaba [IJT], joined the military’s effort in May 1971 to launch two paramilitary counterinsurgency units.'... 'The IJT provided a large number of recruits….The two special brigades of Islamists cadres were named Al-Shams and Al-Badr…. A separate Razakars Directorate was established… Two separate wings called Al-Badr and Al-Shams were recognised... 'Well educated and properly motivated students from schools and madrasas were put in Al-Badr wing, where they were trained to undertake specialised operations… the remainder were grouped together under Al-Shams.'

    Ashrafuz Zaman Khan
    Chowdhury Mueen-Uddin
    Ali Ahsan Mohammad Mojaheed

    After the surrender of the West Pakistani army on December 16, 1971, Al-Badr was dissolved together with the Razakar and Al-Shams. Many of the members of this elite unit were arrested. However during the time of President Ziaur Rahman, all of the collaborators including Al Badr were pardoned.

    It is alleged that Al-Badr perpetrated atrocities against civilians during the war of 1971, in particular, the massacre of intellectuals in Dhaka that occurred on December 15, 1971.According to journalist Azadur Rahman Chandan The Al-Badr was experimentally launched in Jamalpur, Mymensingh on April 1971 as a voluntary force with Islami Chhatra Sangha activists as its first recruits to wage war against the freedom fighters. They were enlisted and trained under the guidance of Mohammad Kamaruzzaman, the assistant secretary general of Jamaat. Al-Badr is accused of carrying out a planned massacre and particularly the killing of the leading intelligentsia just two days ahead of the finalvictory on December 16, 1971. Citing excerpts from an investigative report published in the New York Times on January 3, 1972, Azadur Rahman Chandan said, 'Dressed in black sweaters and khaki pants, members of the group, known as Al-Badar, rounded up their victims on the last three nights of the war.'......

  7. Al-Badr (East Pakistan) - Wikiwand

    www.wikiwand.com › en › Al-Badr_(East_Pakistan)

    The Al-Badr was a paramilitary force composed mainly of Bihari Muslims[1] which operated in East Pakistan against the Bengali nationalist movement during the Bangladesh Liberation War, under the patronage of the Pakistani government.[2][3]

  8. Mobilpedia - Wikipedia Mobile Encyclopedia - What is / means Al-Badr (East Pakistan) - For other uses, see Al-Badr. The Al-Badr (Bengali: আল বদর) was a paramilitary force composed mainly of Bihari Muslims& ...

  9. Al-Shams (East Pakistan) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Al-Shams_(East_Pakistan)

    The Al-Shams (Bengali: আল শামস) was an anti-Bangladesh paramilitary wing of several Islamist parties in East Pakistan composed of local Bengalis and Muhajirs that along with the Pakistan Army and the Al-Badr, is accused of conducting a mass killing campaign against Bengali nationalists, civilians, religious and ethnic minorities during 1971.

  10. Al-Badr (East Pakistan) - Unionpedia, the concept map

    en.unionpedia.org › Al-Badr_(East_Pakistan)

    The Al-Shams (আল শামস) was an anti-Bangladesh paramilitary wing of several Islamist parties in East Pakistan composed of local Bengalis and Biharis that along with the Pakistan Army and the Al-Badr, is accused of conducting a mass killing campaign against Bengali nationalists, civilians, religious and ethnic minorities during 1971.