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      • From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Autocracy is a form of government. In an autocracy, a single person has all legal and political power, and makes all decisions by himself or herself. The person who holds the power is called an autocrat.
      simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autocracy#:~:text=From%20Wikipedia%2C%20the%20free%20encyclopedia%20Autocracy%20is%20a,who%20holds%20the%20power%20is%20called%20an%20autocrat.
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    What is the definition of autocracy?

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    Is autocracy same as dictatorship?

  2. Autocracy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autocracy

    Autocracy is a system of government in which supreme political power to direct all the activities of the state is concentrated in the hands of one person, whose decisions are subject to neither external legal restraints nor regularized mechanisms of popular control (except perhaps for the implicit threat of coup d'etat or mass insurrection).

  3. Autocracy is a form of government. In an autocracy, a single person has all legal and political power, and makes all decisions by himself or herself. The person who holds the power is called an autocrat. When there is a monarch ruling a country as an absolute monarchy, this is also called an autocracy.

  4. Tsarist autocracy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsarist_autocracy

    e Tsarist autocracy (Russian: царское самодержавие, transcr. tsarskoye samoderzhaviye) is a form of autocracy (later absolute monarchy) specific to the Grand Duchy of Moscow, which later became Tsardom of Russia and the Russian Empire. In it, all power and wealth is controlled (and distributed) by the Tsar.

  5. An au­toc­racy is a sys­tem of gov­ern­ment in which supreme power is con­cen­trated in the hands of one per­son, whose de­ci­sions are sub­ject to nei­ther ex­ter­nal legal re­straints nor reg­u­lar­ized mech­a­nisms of pop­u­lar con­trol (ex­cept per­haps for the im­plicit threat of a coup d'état or mass in­sur­rec­tion).

  6. Liberal autocracy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberal_autocracy

    A liberal autocracy is a non-democratic government that follows the principles of liberalism. Until the 20th century, most countries in Western Europe were "liberal autocracies, or at best, semi-democracies". One example of a "classic liberal autocracy" was the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

  7. Autocracy - Wikipedia

    sco.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autocracy

    An autocracy is a seestem o govrenment in which a supreme pouer is concentratit in the hands o ane person, whose decisions are subject tae neither external legal restraints nor regularized mechanisms o popular control (except aiblins for the implicit threat o coup d'état or mass insurrection).

  8. autocracy - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/autocracy

    Sep 15, 2019 · autocracy (countable and uncountable, plural autocracies) (uncountable) A form of government in which unlimited power is held by a single individual. (countable) An instance of this government.

  9. Talk:Autocracy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Autocracy

    Autocracy/Monarchy Although whoever posted the Merriam-Webster's definition of an autocracy was following a reasonable procedure, the definition provided by MW is very poorly written and not accurate. It reads: An autocrat is a person (as a monarch) ruling with unlimited authority.

  10. Autocracy

    www.cs.mcgill.ca/.../wpcd/wp/a/Autocracy.htm

    An autocracy is a form of government in which the political power is held by a single person. The term autocrat is derived from the Greek word autokratôr (lit. "self-ruler", "ruler of one's self"). Compare with oligarchy (rule by a minority, by a small group) and democracy (rule by the majority, by the people).

  11. Meritocracy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meritocracy

    Meritocracy (merit, from Latin mereō, and -cracy, from Ancient Greek κράτος kratos 'strength, power') is a political system in which economic goods and/or political power are vested in individual people on the basis of talent, effort, and achievement, rather than wealth or social class.

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