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  1. Conrad I, Duke of Swabia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_I,_Duke_of_Swabia

    Conrad I, Duke of Swabia From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Conrad I (also Konrad) (born 915/920 - died 20 August 997) was Duke of Swabia from 983 until 997. His appointment as duke marked the return of Conradine rule over Swabia for the first time since 948.

    • Hermann II

      Life. Herman II was the son of Conrad I.There is, however,...

    • Life

      There is considerable confusion about Conrad and his family....

    • Children

      With his wife, Conrad had at least six children, including:...

  2. Duke of Swabia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_of_Swabia

    The Dukes of Swabia were the rulers of the Duchy of Swabia during the Middle Ages. Swabia was one of the five stem duchies of the medieval German kingdom, and its dukes were thus among the most powerful magnates of Germany. The most notable family to rule Swabia was the Hohenstaufen family, who held it, with a brief interruption, from 1079 until 1268. For much of this period, the Hohenstaufen were also Holy Roman Emperors. With the death of Conradin, the last Hohenstaufen duke, the duchy itself

    Name
    Birth
    Marriages
    Death
    Frederick I 1079–1105
    1050 son of Frederick von Büren and Hildegard of Egisheim-Dagsburg
    Agnes of Germany 1089 11 children
    21 July 1105 aged 54 or 55
    Frederick II the One-Eyed 1105–1147
    1090 son of Frederick I and Agnes of Germany
    Judith of Bavaria 1121 2 children Agnes of Saarbrücken c.1132 2 children
    6 April 1147 aged 56 or 57
    Frederick III Barbarossa 1147–1152
    1122 son of Frederick II and Judith of Bavaria
    Adelheid of Vohburg 2 March 1147 Eger no children Beatrice of Burgundy 9 June 1156 Würzburg 12 children
    10 June 1190 aged 67 or 68
    Frederick IV 1152–1167
    1145 son of Conrad III of Germany and Gertrude von Sulzbach
    Gertrude of Bavaria 1166 no children
    19 August 1167 Rome aged 21 or 22
  3. Conrad I of Germany - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_I_of_Germany
    • Overview
    • Early life
    • Rule

    Conrad I, called the Younger, was the king of East Francia from 911 to 918. He was the first king not of the Carolingian dynasty, the first to be elected by the nobility and the first to be anointed. He was chosen as the king by the rulers of the East Frankish stem duchies after the death of young king Louis the Child. Ethnically Frankish, prior to this election he had ruled the Duchy of Franconia from 906.

    Conrad was the son of duke Conrad of Thuringia and his wife Glismut, probably related to Ota, wife of the Carolingian emperor Arnulf of Carinthia and mother of Louis the Child. The Conradines, counts in the Franconian Lahngau region, had been loyal supporters of the Carolingians. At the same time, they competed vigorously for predominance in Franconia with the sons of the Babenbergian duke Henry of Franconia at Bamberg Castle. In 906 the two parties battled each other near Fritzlar. Conrad the E

    After the death of Louis the Child, Conrad was elected king of East Francia on 10 November 911 at Forchheim by the rulers of Saxony, Swabia and Bavaria. The dukes prevented the succession to the throne of Louis' Carolingian relative Charles the Simple, king of West Francia. They chose the Conradine scion, who was maternally related to the late king. Only Conrad's rival, Reginar, duke of Lotharingia, refused to give him his allegiance and joined West Francia. Exactly because Conrad I was one of t

  4. Conrad I, duke of Swabia - geni family tree

    www.geni.com/people/Conrad-I-duke-of-Swabia/...

    Conrad I (died August 20, 997) was Duke of Swabia from 983 until 997. His appointment as duke marked the return of Conradine rule over Swabia for the first time since 948.

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  6. Conrad I, Duke of Swabia

    enacademic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/1962798

    Conrad I (died August 20, 997) was Duke of Swabia from 983 until 997. His appointment as duke marked the return of Conradine rule over Swabia for the first time since 948. When Duke Otto I unexpectedly died during the Imperial campaign in Italy of 981-982, he left no heirs. To fill the vacancy, Emperor Otto II appointed Conrad as Duke of Swabia.

  7. Duchy of Swabia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duchy_of_Swabia

    The Duchy of Swabia was proclaimed by the Ahalolfing count palatine Erchanger in 915. He had allied himself with his Hunfriding rival Burchard II and defeated King Conrad I of Germany in a battle at Wahlwies. The most notable family to hold Swabia were the Hohenstaufen, who held it, with a brief

  8. conrad i duke of swabia : definition of conrad i duke of ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/conrad i duke of swabia/en-en

    From Wikipedia Conrad I (died August 20, 997) was Duke of Swabia from 983 until 997. His appointment as duke marked the return of Conradine rule over Swabia for the first time since 948. When Duke Otto I unexpectedly died during the Imperial campaign in Italy of 981-982, he left no heirs.

  9. Conrad II, Duke of Swabia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_II,_Duke_of_Swabia

    Life. After the third-born son of the Emperor, who was originally called Conrad, had been renamed Frederick around 1170, this first name, which had a long tradition in the Staufen dynasty, had been freed up for a younger son. Conrad was invested by his father with the Franconian domains who reverted to the German crown after the death of Frederick IV, Duke of Swabia in 1167; this certainly happened at the latest in 1188 when he was first referred to as dux de Rotenburch (Duke of Rothenburg).

  10. Frederick I, Duke of Swabia — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org/en/Frederick_I,_Duke_of_Swabia

    Life. He was the son of Fred­er­ick of Büren (c.1020–1053), Count in the Ries­gau and Swabian Count Pala­tine, with Hilde­gard of Egisheim - Dags­burg (d. 1094/95), a niece of Pope Leo IX and founder of the Abbey of Saint Faith in Schlettstadt, Al­sace.