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  2. Electorate of Mainz - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electorate_of_Mainz

    The Electorate of Mainz, previously known in English as Mentz and by its French name Mayence, was one of the most prestigious and influential states of the Holy Roman Empire. In the Roman Catholic hierarchy, the Archbishop-Elector of Mainz was the Primate of Germany, a purely honorary dignity that was unsuccessfully claimed from time to time by other archbishops. There were only two other ecclesiastical Prince-electors in the Empire: the Electorate of Cologne and the Electorate of Trier. The Arc

    • Mainz
    • Electorate
    • Elective principality
    • Middle Ages
  3. Elector of Mainz - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elector_of_Mainz

    The Elector of Mainz was one of the seven Prince-electors of the Holy Roman Empire. As both the Archbishop of Mainz and the ruling prince of the territory, the Elector of Mainz held a powerful position during the Middle Ages.

  4. Electorate of Mainz - Wikipediam.org

    en.wikipediam.org/wiki/Electorate_of_Mainz

    In the Roman Catholic hierarchy, the Archbishop-Elector of Mainz was the Primate of Germany (primas Germaniae), a purely honorary dignity that was unsuccessfully claimed from time to time by other archbishops.

  5. The Electorate of Mainz (German: Kurfürstentum Mainz or Kurmainz, Latin: Electoratus Moguntinus), also known in English by its French name, Mayence, was the most prestigious and among the most influential states of the Holy Roman Empire from its creation to the dissolution of the HRE in the early years of the 19th century.

  6. The Elector of Mainz was one of the seven Prince-electors of the Holy Roman Empire. Both a ruling prince and an archbishop, the Elector of Mainz held a powerful position during the Middle Ages and retained some importance until the dissolution of the empire in 1806. The Elector of Mainz was president of the electoral college, arch-chancellor of the empire and primate of Germany. The origin of ...

  7. Mainz - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moguntiacum

    Mainz became an important city in the 8th century AD as part of the Holy Roman Empire, capital of the Electorate of Mainz and seat of the Archbishop-Elector of Mainz, the Primate of Germany. Mainz is famous as the home of Johannes Gutenberg , the inventor of the movable-type printing press , who in the early 1450s manufactured his first books in the city, including the Gutenberg Bible .

  8. Electorate_of_Mainz : definition of Electorate_of_Mainz and ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/Electorate_of_Mainz/en-en

    Definitions of Electorate_of_Mainz, synonyms, antonyms, derivatives of Electorate_of_Mainz, analogical dictionary of Electorate_of_Mainz (English)

  9. Electoral Palatinate - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electoral_Palatinate

    The County Palatine of the Rhine (German: kurfürstliche Pfalzgrafschaft bei Rhein or kurfürstlich rheinische Pfalzgrafschaft), later the Electorate of the Palatinate (Kurfürstentum Pfalz) or simply Electoral Palatinate (Kurpfalz), was a territory in the Holy Roman Empire (specifically, a palatinate) administered by the count palatine of the Rhine.

  10. Joachim I Nestor, Elector of Brandenburg - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joachim_I_Nestor,_Elector...

    The acquisition in 1514 of the very influential Prince-Archbishopric-Electorate of Mainz for Albert was a coup that provided the Hohenzollerns with control over two of the seven electoral votes in imperial elections and many suffragan dioceses to levy dues.

  11. Electorate of Trier - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electorate_of_Trier

    Map from the 18th century by Frederik de Wit. The Electorate of Trier ( German: Kurfürstentum Trier or Kurtrier ), traditionally known in English by its French name of Trèves, was an ecclesiastical principality of the Holy Roman Empire that existed from the end of the 9th to the early 19th century. It consisted of the temporal possessions of the prince-archbishop of Trier ( Erzbistum Trier ), also a prince-elector of the empire, along with the Elector of Cologne and the Elector of Mainz ...