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  1. Grand Duchy of Lithuania - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Duchy_of_Lithuania

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Grand Duchy of Lithuania was a European state that lasted from the 13th century to 1795, when the territory was partitioned among the Russian Empire, the Kingdom of Prussia and Austria. The state was founded by the Lithuanians, a polytheistic Baltic tribe from Aukštaitija.

  2. Grand Duchy of Lithuania - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Duchy_of_Lithuania

    The Grand Duchy of Lithuania was a European state from the 12th –13th century until 1569. In 1569 it became a part of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth until 1791. It was started by the Lithuanians. The duchy grew to include large parts of the former Kievan Rus' and other Slavic lands.

  3. Duchy of Lithuania - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duchy_of_Lithuania

    After the expansion of the Lithuanian state in the 13th century, when it became known as the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the Kingdom of Lithuania (1251–1263), the Duchy of Lithuania became an administrative unit, governed by dukes and inherited through dynastic links.

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  5. Category:Grand Duchy of Lithuania - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Grand_Duchy_of...

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Wikimedia Commons has media related to Grand Duchy of Lithuania. The main article for this category is Grand Duchy of Lithuania.

  6. List of rulers of Lithuania - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Duke_of_Lithuania

    The state of Lithuania was formed in the 1230s: when threatened by the Livonian Order in the north and the Teutonic Knights in the west, the Baltic tribes united under the leadership of Mindaugas. He became the only crowned king of Lithuania. His state became known as the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.

  7. Seimas of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seimas_of_the_Grand_Duchy...

    Seimas (Sejm, Sojm, Belarusian: Сойм) was an early parliament in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. It was active from 1445 to 1569, when it was officially abolished by the Union of Lublin . [1] The Seimas was an irregular gathering of the Lithuanian nobility , called as needed by the Grand Duke or during an interregnum by the Lithuanian Council ...

  8. Palace of the Grand Dukes of Lithuania - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palace_of_the_Grand_Dukes...

    It was originally constructed in the 15th century for the rulers of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the future Kings of Poland. The palace, located in the lower castle of Vilnius, evolved over the years and prospered during the 16th and mid-17th centuries.

  9. Grand duke - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Duke

    Grand Duke of Lithuania. Throughout the history of Lithuania from the middle 1200s to the late 1700s, most of its leaders were referred to as Grand Dukes of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, even when they jointly held the title King of Poland and other titles.

  10. Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish–Lithuanian...

    The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth – formally, the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and, after 1791, the Commonwealth of Poland – was a country and bi-federation of Poland and Lithuania ruled by a common monarch in real union, who was both King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania.

  11. Grand Duchy of Moscow - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Duchy_of_Moscow

    The state originated with the rule of Alexander Nevsky of the Rurik dynasty, when in 1283 his son Daniel I was appointed to rule the newly-created Grand Principality of Moscow, which was a vassal state to the Mongol Empire (under the " Tatar Yoke "), and which had eclipsed and eventually absorbed its parent duchy of Vladimir-Suzdal by the 1320s.