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    • Residences of the Royal House of Savoy - Wikipedia
      • From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Residences of the Royal House of Savoy are a group of buildings in Turin and the Metropolitan City of Turin, in Piedmont (northern Italy). It was added to the UNESCO World Heritage Sites list in 1997.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residences_of_the_Royal_House_of_Savoy#:~:text=From%20Wikipedia%2C%20the%20free%20encyclopedia%20The%20Residences%20of,the%20UNESCO%20World%20Heritage%20Sites%20list%20in%201997.
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  2. House of Savoy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Savoy

    The House of Savoy is a royal dynasty that was established in 1003 in the historical Savoy region. Through gradual expansion, the family grew in power from ruling a small Alpine county north-west of Italy to absolute rule of the Kingdom of Sicily in 1713 to 1720, when they were handed over the island of Sardinia, over which they would exercise direct rule from then onward. Through its junior branch of Savoy-Carignano, the House of Savoy led the unification of Italy in 1861 and ruled the Kingdom

  3. Residences of the Royal House of Savoy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residences_of_the_Royal...

    The House of Savoy is an ancient royal family, being founded in year 1003 in the Savoy region (now in Rhône-Alpes, France), later expanding so that by 1720 it reigned over the Kingdom of Sardinia in northwestern Italy.

    • 370.82 ha (916.3 acres)
    • 1997 (21st session)
    • Cultural: (i), (ii), (iv), (v)
    • Piedmont, Italy
  4. House of Savoy-Carignano - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Savoy-Carignano
    • Overview
    • Origin
    • France
    • Service with Spain
    • Piedmontese Civil War
    • Second generation

    The House of Savoy-Carignano originated as a cadet branch of the House of Savoy. It was founded by Thomas Francis of Savoy, Prince of Carignano, an Italian military commander who was the fifth son of Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy. His descendants were accepted as princes étrangers at the court of France, where some held prominent positions. They eventually came to reign as kings of Sardinia from 1831 to 1861, and as kings of Italy from 1861 until the dynasty's deposition in 1946. The...

    Born in Turin, Thomas Francis of Savoy was the youngest of the five legitimate sons of Charles Emmanuel I, sovereign Duke of Savoy, by his wife, Catherine Micaela of Spain. While still a young man, he bore arms in Italy in the service of the King of Spain. Although in previous reigns, younger sons of Savoy had been granted rich appanages in Switzerland, Italy, or France, the Savoy dukes found that this inhibited their own aggrandizement while encouraging intra-dynastic strife and regional secess

    In anticipation of this inheritance, Thomas Francis and Marie did not establish themselves at his brother's ducal capital, Turin, but dwelt in Paris, where Marie enjoyed the exalted rank of a princesse du sang, being a second cousin of King Louis XIII. It was arranged that Thomas Francis, as son of a reigning monarch, would hold the rank of first among the princes étrangers at the French court —- taking precedence even before the formerly all-powerful House of Guise, whose kinship to the ...

    The first recorded military service of Thomas Francis is as a commander in the Piedmontese army under his father against France during the War of the Mantuan Succession in 1630. Cardinal Mazarin induced him to become, in effect, a French agent at the Piedmontese court between 1630 and 1632. When the new Duke Victor Amadeus I was forced to accept French occupation of Pinerolo in the Peace of Cherasco in 1631, there was widespread dissatisfaction in Piedmont, and Thomas Francis, with his brother,

    After seeking Spanish support late in 1638 for action against the Regent Christine of Savoy, Madame Royale, Thomas went to Spanish Milan early in 1639, and alongside Spanish forces invaded Piedmont, where many towns welcomed him. He took Turin by knavery, but the French continued to control its citadel. In 1640, he held the city in the multi-layered siege of Turin. After repeated bouts of negotiations with the Regent and the French, Thomas Francis made peace with both in the first half of 1642,

    Among the children of Prince Thomas Francis and Marie de Bourbon-Soissons were: 1. Princess Louise Christine, married in 1654 to Ferdinand Maximilian of Baden-Baden 2. Emmanuel Philibert, 2nd Prince di Carignano, lived in Italy, becoming governor of Ivrea in 1644, and of Asti in 1663. In 1684, he married in Racconigi, Princess Angela Catherina d'Este, granddaughter of Cesare I d'Este, Duke of Modena. Because he was deaf-mute, the marriage shocked his mother, infuriated his sister-in-law Olympia

  5. The House of Savoy was the ruling dynasty of the Duchy of Savoy, then the Kingdom of Sardinia and later Kingdom of Italy from 1861 to 1946. The House of Savoy began in Switzerland in the Middle Ages. The Savoy rose to power in Sicily War of Spanish Succession then gave up Sicily for Sardinia in 1720 later adding Piedmont to their kingdom.

  6. Category:House of Savoy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:House_of_Savoy

    Pages in category "House of Savoy" The following 146 pages are in this category, out of 146 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ().

  7. Savoy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savoy
    • Overview
    • Geography
    • History
    • Modern regionalist politics
    • Modern historiographical debates

    Savoy (/səˈvɔɪ/; Arpitan: Savouè; French: Savoie (listen); Italian: Savoia; Piedmontese: Savòja; German: Savoyen; Arabic: Sawaya‎; is a cultural-historical region in Europe. It comprises roughly the territory of the Western Alps between Lake Geneva in the north and Dauphiné in the south. The historical land of Savoy emerged as the feudal territory of the House of Savoy during the 11th to 14th centuries. The historical territory is shared among the modern countries of France, Italy...

    In modern France, Savoy is part of the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region. Following its annexation to France in 1860, the territory of Savoy was divided administratively into two separate departments, Savoie and Haute-Savoie. The traditional capital remains Chambéry, on the rivers Leysse and Albane, hosting the castle of the House of Savoy and the Savoyard senate. The state included six districts: 1. Savoie Propre, sometimes known as Ducal Savoy 2. Chablais 3. Faucigny 4. Tarentaise 5 ...

    The region was occupied by the Allobroges, a Gaulish people that the Roman Republic subdued in 121 BC. The name Savoy stems from the Late Latin Sapaudia, referring to a fir forest.[n 1] The word is likely ultimately from Gaulish – sapin itself is a blend of Gaulish sappos ...

    By the 8th century, the territory that would later become known as Savoy was part of Francia, and at the division of Francia at the Treaty of Verdun in 843, it became part of the short-lived kingdom of Middle Francia. After only 12 years, at the death of Lothair I in 855, Middle

    On 19 February 1416 Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor, made the County of Savoy an independent duchy, with Amadeus VIII as the first duke. Straddling the Alps, Savoy lay within two competing spheres of influence, a French sphere and a North Italian one. At the time of the Renaissance

    Since the mid-20th century, regionalist movements have appeared in Savoy much as in other historic provinces of France. The Mouvement Région Savoie was founded in December 1971 as a 'movement' in favour of regional autonomy. Unlike other historic provinces, including Normandy and Brittany, Savoy does not currently have its own region within France and is part of the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region. In the 1996 local elections, the Savoy Regional Movement received 19,434 votes; it received ...

    In recent years, sparked by the tiny Savoyard separatist movement, much attention has been focused on questioning the validity of the 1860 annexation. The Ligue Savoisienne, for example, rejects the Treaty of Turin and subsequent plebiscite as null and void, arguing that the plebiscite did not meet the standards of a free and fair vote. Today, historians generally acknowledge that the plebiscite of 1860 did feature irregularities, but they also affirm that the annexation instrument was the Treat

    • 10,416 km² (4,022 sq mi)
    • Chambéry
    • 33
    • Annecy
  8. House of Savoy | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/House_of_Savoy
    • History
    • List of Rulers
    • Titles of The Crown of Sardinia
    • Titles of The Crown of Italy
    • Dynastic Orders
    • See Also
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    The name derives from the historical region Savoy in the Alpine region between what is now France and Italy. Over time, the House of Savoy expanded through judicious marriages to gain political power. They went from ruling that region to rule almost all of the Italian Peninsula. Yet their growth and survival over the centuries was not based on spectacular conquests, but on gradual territorial expansion through marriage and methodical and highly manipulative political acquisitions.

    Main Branch 1. Humbert I \\"Biancamano\\" (\\"White hand\\") : 1003–1047 or 1048 2. Amadeus I : 1048–1051 or 1056 3. Otto : 1051 or 1056–1060 4. Peter I : 1060–1078 5. Amadeus II : 1060–1080 6. Humbert II : 1080–1103 7. Amadeus III : 1103–1148 8. Humbert III : 1148–1189 9. Thomas I : 1189–1233 10. Amadeus IV : 1233–1253 11. Boniface : 1253–1263 12. Peter II : 1263–1268 13. Philip I : 1268–1285 14. Amadeus V : 1285–1323 15. Edward I : 1323–1329 16. Aimone : 1329–1343 17. Amadeus VI : 1343–1383 18. Ama...

    VITTORIO AMEDEO III, per la grazia di Dio Re di Sardegna, Cipro, Gerusalemme e Armenia; Duca di Savoia, Monferrato, Chablais, Aosta e Genevese; Principe di Piemonte ed Oneglia; Marchese in Italia, di Saluzzo, Susa, Ivrea, Ceva, Maro, Oristano, Sezana; Conte di Moriana, Nizza, Tenda, Asti, Alessandria, Goceano; Barone di Vaud e di Faucigny; Signore di Vercelli, Pinerolo, Tarantasia, Lumellino, Val di Sesia; Principe e Vicario perpetuo del Sacro Romano Impero in Italia.The English translation i...

    Victor Emmanuel II, by the Grace of God and the Will of the Nation, King of Italy, King of Sardinia, Cyprus, Jerusalem, Armenia, Duke of Savoy, Count of Maurienne, Marquis (of the Holy Roman Empire) in Italy; Prince of Piedmont, Carignano, Oneglia, Poirino, Trino; Prince and Perpetual vicar of the Holy Roman Empire; Prince of Carmagnola, Montmellian with Arbin and Francin, Prince bailliff of the Duchy of Aosta, Prince of Chieri, Dronero, Crescentino, Riva di Chieri e Banna, Busca, Bene, Brà,...

    The House of Savoy has held two dynastic orders since 1434, which were brought into the Kingdom of Italy as national orders. Although the Kingdom of Italy ceased to exist in 1946, King Umberto II did not abdicate his role as fons honorum over the two dynastic orders over which the family has long held sovereignty and grand mastership. The following are the dynastic orders of the Royal House of Savoy. Today, HRH Victor Emmanuel, Prince of Naples is hereditary Sovereign and Grand Master of thes...

    1. Duke of Aosta 2. List of nicknames of European Royalty and Nobility 3. Counts of Villafranca 4. List of rulers of Savoy 5. List of consorts of Savoy 6. County of Savoy 7. Duchy of Savoy 8. Kingdom of Sardinia 9. List of monarchs of Sardinia 10. List of Sardinian consorts 11. Kingdom of Italy 12. King of Italy 13. List of Italian queens

    1. Francesco Cognasso: I Savoia nella politica europea. Milano, 1941 (Storia e politica). 2. Robert Katz: The Fall of the House of Savoy. A Study in the Relevance of the Commonplace or the Vulgarity of History, London 1972. 3. Eugene L. Cox: The Eagles of Savoy. The House of Savoy in thirteenth-century Europe. Princeton, N.J., 1974. 4. Denis Mack Smith: Italy and its Monarchy, New Haven, 1992. 5. Toby Osborne: Dynasty and Diplomacy in the Court of Savoy. Political Culture and the Thirty Year...

    1. Official website of the Duke of Aosta 2. Official website of the Prince of Naples 3. Brief history of the House with a picture of coat-of-arm 4. Genealogy of recent members of the House 5. House of Savoy fansite 6. The Heads of House of SavoyTemplate:Princes of SavoyTemplate:Princesses of SavoyTemplate:European Royal Families

  9. House of Savoy

    enacademic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/43597
    • History
    • List of Rulers
    • Name, Motto, Titles
    • Titles of The Crown of Sardinia
    • Titles of The Crown of Italy
    • Dynastic Orders
    • See Also
    • Other Studies
    • External Links

    The House of Savoy emerged, along with the free communes of Switzerland, in what is now called Switzerland. The name derives from the historical region Savoy in what is now France and Italy. Over time the house expanded from that region to rule almost all of the Italian Peninsula. Yet their growth and survival over the centuries was not based on spectacular conquests, but on gradual territorial expansion through marriage and methodical and highly manipulative political acquisitions.

    Main Branch 1. Humbert I \\"Biancamano\\" (\\"White hand\\") : 1003–1047 or 1048 2. Amadeus I : 1048–1051 or 1056 3. Otto : 1051 or 1056–1060 4. Peter I : 1060–1078 5. Amadeus II : 1060–1080 6. Humbert II : 1080–1103 7. Amadeus III : 1103–1148 8. Humbert III : 1148–1189 9. Thomas I : 1189–1233 10. Amadeus IV : 1233–1253 11. Boniface : 1253–1263 12. Peter II : 1263–1268 13. Philip I : 1268–1285 14. Amadeus V : 1285–1323 15. Edward I : 1323–1329 16. Aimone : 1329–1343 17. Amadeus VI : 1343–1383 18. Ama...

    Name of the dynasty: Reale Casa di SavoiaMotto: FERT 1. \\"Foedere Et Religione Tenemur\\" (We will be kept together by the [constitutional] pact and by religion) 1. \\"Fortitudo Eius Rhodum Tenuit\\" (His strength preserved Rhodes). This refers to Duke Amadeo V \\"the Great\\" (1249–1323), who fought against the Saracens at the siege of Rhodes in 1310. 2. \\"Fortitudo Eius Rempublicam Tenet\\" (His bravery preserves the Republic) 3. \\"Fides Est Regni Tutela\\" (Faith is the protection of the kingdom) 4. The pr...

    VITTORIO AMEDEO III, per la grazia di Dio Re di Sardegna, Cipro, Gerusalemme e Armenia; Duca di Savoia, Monferrato, Chablais, Aosta e Genevese; Principe di Piemonte ed Oneglia; Marchese in Italia, di Saluzzo, Susa, Ivrea, Ceva, Maro, Oristano, Sezana; Conte di Moriana, Nizza, Tenda, Asti, Alessandria, Goceano; Barone di Vaud e di Faucigny; Signore di Vercelli, Pinerolo, Tarantasia, Lumellino, Val di Sesia; Principe e Vicario perpetuo del Sacro Romano Impero in Italia.The English translation i...

    Victor Emmanuel II, by the Grace of God and the Will of the Nation, King of Italy, King of Sardinia, Cyprus, Jerusalem, Armenia, Duke of Savoy, Count of Maurienne, Marquis (of the Holy Roman Empire) in Italy; Prince of Piedmont, Carignano, Oneglia, Poirino, Trino; Prince and Perpetual vicar of the Holy Roman Empire; Prince of Carmagnola, Montmellian with Arbin and Francin, Prince bailliff of the Duchy of Aosta, Prince of Chieri, Dronero, Crescentino, Riva di Chieri e Banna, Busca, Bene, Brà,...

    The House of Savoy has held two dynastic orders since 1434, which were brought into the Kingdom of Italy as national orders. Although the Kingdom of Italy ceased to exist in 1946, King Umberto II did not abdicate his role as fons honorum over the two dynastic orders over which the family has long held sovereignty and grand mastership. The following are the dynastic orders of the Royal House of Savoy. Today, HRH Victor Emmanuel, Prince of Naples is hereditary Sovereign and Grand Master of thes...

    1. Eugene of Savoy 2. Duke of Aosta 3. List of nicknames of European Royalty and Nobility 4. Counts of Villafranca

    1. Francesco Cognasso: I Savoia nella politica europea. Milano, 1941 (Storia e politica). 2. Robert Katz: The Fall of the House of Savoy. A Study in the Relevance of the Commonplace or the Vulgarity of History, London 1972. 3. Eugene L. Cox: The Eagles of Savoy. The House of Savoy in thirteenth-century Europe. Princeton, N.J., 1974. 4. Denis Mack Smith: Italy and its Monarchy, New Haven, 1992. 5. Toby Osborne: Dynasty and Diplomacy in the Court of Savoy. Political Culture and the Thirty Year...

    1. Official website of the Duke of Aosta 2. Official website of the Prince of Naples 3. Brief history of the House with a picture of coat-of-arm 4. Genealogy of recent members of the House 5. House of Savoy fansite 6. The Heads of House of Savoy 7. Historical Development of titles of the House of Savoy

  10. Duchy of Savoy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duchy_of_Savoy

    The duchy was an Imperial fief, subject of the Holy Roman Empire with a vote in the Imperial Diet. From the 16th century, Savoy belonged to the Upper Rhenish Circle. Throughout its history, it was ruled by the House of Savoy and formed a part of the larger Savoyard state.

    • Roman Catholicism
    • Chambéry (1416–1562), Turin (1562–1847)
  11. House of Lusignan - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Lusignan

    The House of Lusignan (/ ˈ l uː z ɪ n j ɒ n / LOO-zin-yon; French: ) was a royal house of French origin, which at various times ruled several principalities in Europe and the Levant, including the kingdoms of Jerusalem, Cyprus, and Armenia, from the 12th through the 15th centuries during the Middle Ages.