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  1. Rome - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rome

    Rome is the principal town of the Metropolitan City of Rome, operative since 1 January 2015. The Metropolitan City replaced the old province, which included the city's metropolitan area and extends further north until Civitavecchia. The Metropolitan City of Rome is the largest by area in Italy.

    • 21 m (69 ft)
    • Italy
    • c. 753 BC
    • Lazio
  2. city-state | Definition, History, & Facts | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/topic/city-state

    Rome, which began its republican history as a city-state, pursued policies of foreign expansion and government centralization that led to the annihilation of the city-state as a political form in the ancient world. The revival of city-states was noticeable by the 11th century, when several Italian towns had reached considerable prosperity.

  3. Ancient Rome - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Rome

    Life in ancient Rome revolved around the city of Rome, located on seven hills. The city had a vast number of monumental structures like the Colosseum , the Forum of Trajan and the Pantheon . It had theatres , gymnasiums , marketplaces, functional sewers, bath complexes complete with libraries and shops, and fountains with fresh drinking water ...

  4. Rome City, IN - Rome City, Indiana Map & Directions - MapQuest

    www.mapquest.com/us/indiana/rome-city-in-282033018

    Rome City is a town in Orange Township, Noble County, Indiana, United States. The population was 1,615 at the 2000 census. Rome City is located at 41°29′27″N 85°21′51″W / 41.49083°N 85.36417°W / 41.49083; -85.36417 (41.490945, -85.364294).

    • Is Rome a country or a state ?

      17 answers

      come on... I can t believe you are asking that. Rome is just the city-capital of Italy.

    • Was ancient Rome a city or a country?

      14 answers

      It was a city-state that controlled an empire

    • is the Vatican a state ?

      10 answers

      Vatican City, or Vatican City State,in Italian officially Stato della Città del Vaticano, which translates literally as State of the City of the Vatican, is a landlocked sovereign city-state whose territory consists of a walled enclave...

  5. Apr 15, 2009 · A state is usually larger than a region, like states in the US, whilst a country is the largest division (but is also, confusingly, called a sovereign State with a capital 'S'). VATICAN CITY is within Rome but is its own country with a population of about 800.

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  7. Ancient Rome - Facts, Location, & Timeline - HISTORY

    www.history.com/topics/ancient-rome/ancient-rome

    Military Expansion . During the early republic, the Roman state grew exponentially in both size and power. Though the Gauls sacked and burned Rome in 390 B.C., the Romans rebounded under the ...

  8. THE BEST Things to Do in Rome City - 2020 (with Photos ...

    www.tripadvisor.com/Attractions-g37483...

    Things to Do in Rome City, Indiana: See Tripadvisor's 27 traveler reviews and photos of Rome City tourist attractions. Find what to do today, this weekend, or in September. We have reviews of the best places to see in Rome City. Visit top-rated & must-see attractions.

  9. Delta Lake State Park is located just north of the city offering endless activities in all four seasons with a boat launch, beach, campground, and all season fishing.The City of Rome is the place where families raise generations to live, work, and call home.

  10. Rome founded - HISTORY

    www.history.com/this-day-in-history/rome-founded
    • Origin
    • Story
    • Death and legacy
    • Early history

    According to tradition, on April 21, 753 B.C., Romulus and his twin brother, Remus, found Rome on the site where they were suckled by a she-wolf as orphaned infants. Actually, the Romulus and Remus myth originated sometime in the fourth century B.C., and the exact date of Romes founding was set by the Roman scholar Marcus Terentius Varro in the first century B.C.

    According to the legend, Romulus and Remus were the sons of Rhea Silvia, the daughter of King Numitor of Alba Longa. Alba Longa was a mythical city located in the Alban Hills southeast of what would become Rome. Before the birth of the twins, Numitor was deposed by his younger brother Amulius, who forced Rhea to become a vestal virgin so that she would not give birth to rival claimants to his title. However, Rhea was impregnated by the war god Mars and gave birth to Romulus and Remus. Amulius ordered the infants drowned in the Tiber, but they survived and washed ashore at the foot of the Palatine hill, where they were suckled by a she-wolf until they were found by the shepherd Faustulus. Reared by Faustulus and his wife, the twins later became leaders of a band of young shepherd warriors. After learning their true identity, they attacked Alba Longa, killed the wicked Amulius, and restored their grandfather to the throne. The twins then decided to found a town on the site where they had been saved as infants. They soon became involved in a petty quarrel, however, and Remus was slain by his brother. Romulus then became ruler of the settlement, which was named Rome after him.

    To populate his town, Romulus offered asylum to fugitives and exiles. Rome lacked women, however, so Romulus invited the neighboring Sabines to a festival and abducted their women. A war then ensued, but the Sabine women intervened to prevent the Sabine men from seizing Rome. A peace treaty was drawn up, and the communities merged under the joint rule of Romulus and the Sabine king, Titus Tatius. Tatius early death, perhaps perpetrated by Romulus, left the Roman as the sole king again. After a long and successful rule, Romulus died under obscure circumstances. Many Romans believed he was changed into a god and worshipped him as the deity Quirinus. After Romulus, there were six more kings of Rome, the last three believed to be Etruscans. Around 509 B.C., the Roman republic was established.

    In the fifth century B.C., a few Greek historians speculated that Aeneas settled at Rome, which was then still a small city-state. In the fourth century B.C., Rome began to expand within the Italian peninsula, and Romans, coming into greater contact with the Greeks, embraced the suggestion that Aeneas had a role in the foundation of their great city. In the first century B.C., the Roman poet Virgil developed the Aeneas myth in his epic poem the Aeneid, which told of Aeneas journey to Rome. Augustus, the first Roman emperor and emperor during Virgils time, and Julius Caesar, his great-uncle and predecessor as Roman ruler, were said to be descended from Aeneas.