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      • Besides Latin, the known ancient Italic languages are Faliscan (the closest to Latin), Umbrian and Oscan (or Osco-Umbrian), and South Picene. Other Indo-European languages once spoken in the peninsula, whose inclusion in the Italic branch is disputed, are Aequian, Vestinian, Venetic and Sicel .
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italic_languages#:~:text=Besides%20Latin%2C%20the%20known%20ancient%20Italic%20languages%20are,is%20disputed%2C%20are%20Aequian%2C%20Vestinian%2C%20Venetic%20and%20Sicel.
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  2. Italic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italic_languages

    The Italic languages share a certain number of isoglosses and common phonetic changes with respect to the common Proto-Indo-European : Evolution of labial stops: *p > p, *b > b, *bʰ- > f-, -*bʰ- > -b-, (-f-) Evolution of alveolar stops: *t > t, *d > d. Latin, for example, has *d > l, as in PIE ...

  3. Italic languages - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italic_languages

    The Italic languages are a branch of the Indo-European language family. They were first spoken in Italy. The main language was Latin, which eventually turned into the Romance languages spoken today. The Roman Empire spread Latin to much of Western Europe. Today, the main Italic languages spoken are Spanish, French, Portuguese, Italian, and Romanian. There were other branches of Italic languages besides those that came from Latin, but they are all now extinct.

  4. Gallo-Italic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gallo-Italic_languages

    The Gallo-Italian, Gallo-Italic, Gallo-Cisalpine or simply Cisalpine languages constitute the majority of the Romance languages of northern Italy. They are Piedmontese, Lombard, Emilian-Romagnol and Ligurian. Although some publications define Venetian as part of the Italo-Dalmatian branch, both Ethnologue and Glottolog group it into the Gallo-Italic languages. The Gallo-Italian languages have characteristics both of the Gallo-Romance languages to the northwest and the Italo-Dalmatian languages t

  5. Proto-Italic language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Italic_language
    • Overview
    • History
    • Phonology
    • Grammar
    • Development

    The Proto-Italic language is the ancestor of the Italic languages, most notably Latin and its descendants, the Romance languages. It is not directly attested in writing, but has been reconstructed to some degree through the comparative method. Proto-Italic descended from the earlier Proto-Indo-European language.

    Based on glottochronological evidence, Proto-Italic is believed to have split off from the archaic western Proto-Indo-European dialects some time before 2500 BC. It was originally spoken by Italic tribes north of the Alps before they moved south into the Italian Peninsula during the second half of the 2nd millennium BCE. Linguistic evidence also points to early contacts with Celtic tribes and Proto-Germanic speakers. Although an equation between archeological and linguistic evidence cannot be es

    Proto-Italic words had a fixed stress on the first syllable. This stress pattern probably remained in most descendants. In Latin, it remained during the Old Latin period, after which it was replaced with the "Classical" penultimate stress pattern.

    Adjectives inflected much the same as nouns. Unlike nouns, adjectives did not have inherent genders. Instead, they inflected for all three genders, taking on the same gender-form as the noun they referred to. Adjectives followed the same inflectional classes of nouns. The largest

    A list of regular phonetic changes from Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Italic follows. Because Latin is the only well-attested Italic language, it forms the main source for the reconstruction of Proto-Italic. It is therefore not always clear whether certain changes apply to all of Italic, or only to Latin, because of lack of conclusive evidence.

  6. The Italic languagesare a subfamily of the Indo-Europeanlanguage family, originally spoken by Italic peoples. They include Latinand its descendants (the Romance languages) as well as a number of extinct languagesof the Italian Peninsula, including Umbrian, Oscan, Faliscan, South Picene, and possibly Veneticand Sicel.

  7. Category:Italic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Italic_languages

    For a list of words relating to Italic languages, see the Italic languages category of words in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. The main article for this category is Italic languages . Language portal

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  8. The Italic languages form a branch of the Indo-European language family, whose earliest known members were spoken in the Italian Peninsula in the first millennium BC. The best known of them is Latin, the official language of the Roman Empire, which conquered the other Italic peoples before the commo

  9. Italic languages | Wikipedia audio article - YouTube

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYWJ3eriNMY

    Nov 30, 2018 · The Italic languages are a subfamily of the Indo-European language family, originally spoken by Italic peoples. They include Latin and its descendants (the Romance languages), as well as a number...

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  10. The Italic languages form a branch of the Indo-European language family, whose earliest known members were spoken in the Italian Peninsula in the first millennium BC. The best known of them is Latin, the official language of the Roman Empire, which conquered the other Italic peoples before the commo

  11. Italic peoples - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italic_peoples

    The Italics were an ethnolinguistic group who are identified by their use of the Italic languages, which form one of the branches of Indo-European languages.. Outside of the specialised linguistic literature, the term is also used to describe all of the ancient peoples of Italy including pre-Roman peoples like the Etruscans and the Raetians, who did not speak Indo-European languages.