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  1. Jewish philosophy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_philosophy

    Until modern Haskalah (Jewish Enlightenment) and Jewish emancipation, Jewish philosophy was preoccupied with attempts to reconcile coherent new ideas into the tradition of Rabbinic Judaism, thus organizing emergent ideas that are not necessarily Jewish into a uniquely Jewish scholastic framework and world-view. With their acceptance into modern society, Jews with secular educations embraced or developed entirely new philosophies to meet the demands of the world in which they now found ...

  2. Category:Jewish philosophy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Jewish_philosophy

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Wikimedia Commons has media related to Jewish philosophy. The main article for this category is Jewish philosophy.

  3. Orthodox Jewish philosophy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthodox_Jewish_philosophy

    Orthodox Jewish philosophy comprises the philosophical and theological teachings of Orthodox Judaism. Though Orthodox Judaism sees itself as the heir of traditional rabbinic Judaism, the present-day movement is thought to have first formed in the late 18th century, mainly in reaction to the Jewish emancipation and the growth of the Haskalah and Reform movements. Orthodox Jewish philosophy concerns itself with interpreting traditional Jewish sources, reconciling the Jewish faith with the changes

  4. Category:Jewish philosophers - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Jewish_philosophers

    Pages in category "Jewish philosophers" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of approximately 453 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ( learn more ).

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  6. Orthodox Jewish philosophy comprises the philosophical and theological teachings of Orthodox Judaism. Though Orthodox Judaism sees itself as the heir of traditional rabbinic Judaism, the present-day movement is thought to have first formed in the late 18th century, mainly in reaction to the Jewish emancipation and the growth of the Haskalah and Reform movements. Orthodox Jewish philosophy ...

  7. Talk:Jewish philosophy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Jewish_philosophy

    Jews have engaged in serious philosophy since before the time of Saddya Gaon, and except in parts of the ultra-Orthodox community, Jewish philosophy has always been held in high regard by a large part of the Jewish community.

  8. Template:Jewish philosophy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Jewish_philosophy

    Baruch Spinoza; Salomon Maimon; Joseph Solomon Delmedigo; Elijah Ba'al Shem of Chelm; Eliezer ben Elijah Ashkenazi; Tzvi Ashkenazi; Jacob Emden; Samuel Hirsch

  9. Jewish ethics - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_ethics

    Jewish ethics is the moral philosophy of the Jewish religion or the Jewish people. A type of normative ethics , Jewish ethics may involve issues in Jewish law as well as non-legal issues, and may involve the convergence of Judaism and the Western philosophical tradition of ethics .

  10. Jewish existentialism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_existentialism

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jewish existentialism is a category of work by Jewish authors dealing with existentialist themes and concepts (e.g. debate about the existence of God and the meaning of human existence), and intended to answer theological questions that are important in Judaism.

  11. Haredi Judaism consists of many spiritual and cultural groups, and is divided into Hasidic sects with streams from Eastern Europe and Sephardic Haredim. The two are different in many aspects, including their beliefs, lifestyles, religious practice and philosophy, and isolation from the general culture where they live.