Yahoo Web Search

  1. Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judaism

    Judaism (originally from Hebrew יהודה ‎, Yehudah, "Judah"; via Latin and Greek) is an ethnic religion comprising the collective religious, cultural and legal tradition and civilization of the Jewish people. Judaism is considered by religious Jews to be the expression of the covenant that God established with the Children of Israel.

  2. Judaism (Hebrew: יהדות) is the world's oldest Abrahamic religion. It is almost 4,000 years old. There are about 15 million followers. They are called Jews.

  3. Christianity and Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christianity_and_Judaism

    Judaism does not see human beings as inherently flawed or sinful and needful of being saved from it, but rather capable with a free will of being righteous, and unlike Christianity does not closely associate ideas of "salvation" with a New Covenant delivered by a Jewish messiah, although in Judaism Jewish people will have a renewed national ...

  4. Messiah in Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messiah_in_Judaism

    The Messiah in Judaism (Hebrew: מָשִׁיחַ ‎, romanized: māšîaḥ; Greek: χριστός, romanized: khristós, lit. 'anointed, covered in oil') is a savior and liberator figure in Jewish eschatology, who is believed to be the future redeemer of the Jewish people.

  5. Bereavement in Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bereavement_in_Judaism

    Bereavement in Judaism (Hebrew: אֲבֵלוּת, avelut, mourning) is a combination of minhag and mitzvah derived from Judaism's classical Torah and rabbinic texts. The details of observance and practice vary according to each Jewish community.

  6. Portal:Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Judaism

    Judaism (originally from Hebrew יהודה ‎, Yehudah, "Judah"; via Latin and Greek) is an ethnic religion comprising the collective religious, cultural and legal tradition and civilization of the Jewish people.

  7. Reform Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reform_Judaism

    Reform Judaism (also known as Liberal Judaism or Progressive Judaism) is a major Jewish denomination that emphasizes the evolving nature of the faith, the superiority of its ethical aspects to the ceremonial ones, and belief in a continuous revelation, closely intertwined with human reason and intellect, and not centered on the theophany at Mount Sinai.

  8. Criticism of Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Criticism_of_Judaism

    Criticism of Judaism refers to criticism of Jewish religious doctrines, texts, laws, and practices. Early criticism originated in inter-faith polemics between Christianity and Judaism. Important disputations in the Middle Ages gave rise to widely publicized criticisms.

  9. Haredi Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haredi_Judaism

    Some scholars have suggested that Haredi Judaism is a reaction to societal changes, including emancipation, the Haskalah movement derived from the Enlightenment, acculturation, secularization, religious reform in all its forms from mild to extreme, the rise of the Jewish national movements, etc. In contrast to Modern Orthodox Judaism, followers ...

  10. Hasidic Judaism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hasidic_Judaism

    Hasidism, sometimes spelled Chassidism, and also known as Hasidic Judaism (Hebrew: חסידות ‎, romanized: Ḥăsīdut, ; originally, "piety"), is a Jewish religious group that arose as a spiritual revival movement in the territory of contemporary Western Ukraine during the 18th century, and spread rapidly throughout Eastern Europe.