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  1. New York City - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City

    New York City, often called simply New York and abbreviated as NYC, is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2019 population of 8,336,817 distributed over about 302.6 square miles, New York City is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the U.S. state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass. With almost 20 million people in

    • 100xx–104xx, 11004–05, 111xx–114xx, 116xx
    • New York
  2. History of New York City - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_New_York_City

    The written history of New York City began with the first European explorer the Italian Giovanni da Verrazzano in 1524. European settlement began with the Dutch in 1608. The "Sons of Liberty" destroyed British authority in New York City, and the Stamp Act Congress of representatives from throughout the Thirteen Colonies met in the city in 1765 to organize resistance to British policies. The city's strategic location and status as a major seaport made it the prime target for British seizure in 17

  3. New York (shortened to NY), often called New York City (shortened to NYC), is the largest city in the United States, located in the state of New York. New York’s population is similar to London in the United Kingdom with over 8 million people currently living in it, and over 22 million people live in the bigger New York metropolitan area.

  4. Climate of New York City - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_of_New_York_City
    • Overview
    • Temperature
    • Precipitation
    • Other phenomena
    • Climate change

    The climate of New York City features a humid subtropical climate, with parts of the city transitioning into a humid continental climate. This gives the city cold, snowy winters and hot, humid summers and plentiful rainfall all year round. Meteorological records have been kept at Central Park since 1821, although the station was relocated to a different part of the park on January 1, 1920. There are also other weather stations in the area including one at LaGuardia Airport, beginning in 1940, an

    The city's regime of temperature features large seasonal swings, with 4 distinct seasons. However, due to its proximity to the Atlantic ocean, these swings are less significant than areas further inland. The Atlantic serves as a moderator of the temperature meaning the city is milder than areas inland during the winter and cooler during the summer. Although, being on the east coast, this effect is less pronounced. All extremes are for the Central Park station.

    The city sees frequent, heavy rainfall which averages 49.9 in annually, with spring being the wettest season and February the driest month. Every single month in the cities recorded history has reported some rainfall, alerting the variability of the climate. Further highlighting the city's variability of weather is the record of only 36 consecutive days without precipitation, between October 10 and November 13, 1924. The city also sees snow, primarily in winter, but sometimes in the late autumn

    The wind is seldom strong in New York City but can occasionally be noticeable. This is especially true in the autumn and winter seasons when extratropical depressions often bring strong winds. The strongest gust in Central Park, of 78 miles per hour, occurred on December 2, 1974

    Being a coastal city, New York City is expected to experience significant affects from rising sea levels. Predictions that the sea level will rise by as much as 6 feet by 2100 have prompted the city's mayor to invest $10 million dollars into keeping the city safe. The city is also expected to become more susceptible to storm surges and flooding, meaning events like Hurricane Sandy's impacts will become more likely in the future.

  5. COVID-19 pandemic in New York City - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COVID-19_pandemic_in_New...

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia For effects of the pandemic in the state, see COVID-19 pandemic in New York (state). The first case relating to the COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed in New York City in March 2020 by a woman who had recently traveled to New York City from Iran, a country already seriously affected by the pandemic at the time.

  6. Music of New York City - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_New_York_City

    The music of New York City is a diverse and important field in the world of music. It has long been a thriving home for popular genres such as jazz, rock, soul music, R&B, funk, disco, and the urban blues, as well as classical and art music.

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  8. New York City FC - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NYCFC

    New York City played its first game in 2015, as the twentieth overall expansion team of the league; it is the first franchise to be based in the city, and the second in the New York metropolitan area, after the New York Red Bulls, with whom they contest the Hudson River Derby.

    • May 21, 2013; 6 years ago
    • The Pigeons, The (Bronx) Blues, The Boys in Blue
  9. The biggest city in New York is also called New York, located in the south-eastern part of the state and built on the Hudson River; it is by far the biggest city in the U.S..

    • New Yorker
    • Albany
    • None
    • Seal
  10. List of songs about New York City - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_songs_about_New...

    This article lists songs about New York City, which are either set there or named after a location or feature of the city.It is not intended to include songs where New York is simply "name-checked" along with other cities.

  11. New York City draft riots - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City_draft_riots

    The New York City draft riots (July 13–16, 1863), sometimes referred to as the Manhattan draft riots and known at the time as Draft Week, were violent disturbances in Lower Manhattan, widely regarded as the culmination of white working-class discontent with new laws passed by Congress that year to draft men to fight in the ongoing American Civil War.

    • July 13, 1863 – July 16, 1863
    • Riots ultimately suppressed
    • 119–120
    • Manhattan, New York, U.S.