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  1. Nicomedia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicomedia

    Nicomedia was the eastern and most senior capital city, chosen by Diocletian who assumed the title Augustus of the East. Nicomedia remained as the eastern (and most senior) capital of the Roman Empire until co-emperor Licinius was defeated by Constantine the Great at the Battle of Chrysopolis (Üsküdar) in 324.

  2. Nicomedia - Clickable Map of the Roman Empire - First Century AD

    www.bible-history.com/maps/romanempire/Nicomedia...

    Nicomedia (Greek: Νικομήδεια, modern İzmit in Turkey) was founded in 712/11 BC as a Megarian colony and, in early Antiquity, was called Astacus (lobster).[1] After being destroyed by Lysimachus,[2] it was rebuilt by Nicomedes I of Bithynia in 264 BC under the name of Nicomedia, and has ever since been one of the most important cities ...

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  3. Nicomedia | Definition of Nicomedia at Dictionary.com

    www.dictionary.com/browse/nicomedia

    any messy substance, especially of a semiliquid consistency. a dessert, typically of cherries, peaches, or apples sweetened and spiced, and topped with biscuit dough. a mixture of nuts, raisins, dried fruits, seeds, or the like eaten as a high-energy snack, as by hikers and climbers. TAKE THE QUIZ TO FIND OUT

  4. Nicomedia - OrthodoxWiki

    orthodoxwiki.org/Nicomedia

    Apr 07, 2010 · Nicomedia was a city in Anatolia, near Constantinople and Nicea, that was the interim capital for Constantine the Great while the city of Byzantium was re-built and became Constantinople. During the early days after Roman recognition of Christianity Nicomedia was a see serving the imperial household.

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  6. CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Nicomedia

    www.newadvent.org/cathen/11070a.htm

    Nicomedia was the favorite residence of Diocletian, who built there a palace, a hippodrome, a mint, and an arsenal. In 303 the edict of the tenth persecution caused rivers of blood to flow through the empire, especially in Nicomedia, where the Bishop Anthimus and a great many Christians were martyred.

  7. Nicomedia (İzmit) - Livius

    www.livius.org/articles/place/nicomedia-izmit

    Apr 29, 2020 · Nicomedia, its lake and the Sangarius River 712/711 BCE: founded as a Greek colony called Astacus ("lobster") Big lake in the hinterland, connected to the river Sangarius ("famous for its large quantities of fish note) and the interior

  8. Nicomedia | Encyclopedia.com

    www.encyclopedia.com/.../nicomedia

    NICOMEDIA Ancient city of Bithynia in Asia Minor, modern Izmit, Turkey. From the 3rd to the 1st century b.c. it was the capital of Bithynia; later, the titular See of Bithynia Prima. Nicomedia was founded by King Zipoetes, whose son Nicomedes I made it his capital (c. 264 b.c.) and adorned it with numerous magnificent buildings.

  9. What does NICOMEDIA mean? - definitions

    www.definitions.net/definition/Nicomedia

    Nicomedia Nicomedia was an ancient city in what is now Turkey, founded in 712/11 BC as a Megarian colony and was originally known as Astacus. After being destroyed by Lysimachus, it was rebuilt by Nicomedes I of Bithynia in 264 BC under the name of Nicomedia, and has ever since been one of the most important cities in northwestern Asia Minor.

  10. İzmit - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Izmit

    Nicomedia was the eastern and most senior capital city of the Roman Empire between 286 and 324, during the Tetrarchy introduced by Diocletian. Following Constantine the Great 's victory over co-emperor Licinius at the Battle of Chrysopolis in 324, Nicomedia served as an interim capital city for Nova Roma.

  11. Eusebius of Nicomedia | bishop | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Eusebius-of-Nicomedia

    Eusebius of Nicomedia, (died c. 342), an important 4th-century Eastern church bishop who was one of the key proponents of Arianism (the doctrine that Jesus Christ is not of the same substance as God) and who eventually became the leader of an Arian group called the Eusebians.