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  1. Normalization (Czechoslovakia) - Wikipedia

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    Normalization (Czechoslovakia) In the history of Czechoslovakia, normalization ( Czech: normalizace, Slovak: normalizácia) is a name commonly given to the period following the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in August 1968 and up to the glasnost era of liberalization that began in the Soviet Union and its neighboring nations in 1987.

    • Objectives

      The official objectives of normalization were the...

    • Reactions

      The absence of popular support for the Husák leadership was...

  2. Talk:Normalization (Czechoslovakia) - Wikipedia

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    Talk:Normalization (Czechoslovakia) This article is within the scope of WikiProject Czech Republic, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the Czech Republic on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.

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  4. Normalization - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Normalization

    Normalization or normalisation refers to a process that makes something more normal or regular. Most commonly it refers to: Normalization (sociology) or social normalization, the process through which ideas and behaviors that may fall outside of social norms come to be regarded as "normal"

  5. Normalization (Czechoslovakia) - WikiMili, The Best Wikipedia ...

    wikimili.com › en › Normalization_(Czechoslovakia)

    Jul 19, 2020 · In the history of Czechoslovakia, normalization (Czech: normalizace , Slovak: normalizácia ) is a name commonly given to the period following the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in August 1968 and up to the glasnost era of liberalization that began in the Soviet Union and its neighboring nati

  6. Wikizero - Normalization (Czechoslovakia)

    www.wikizero.com › en › Normalization_(Czechoslovakia)

    WikiZero Özgür Ansiklopedi - Wikipedia Okumanın En Kolay Yolu . In the history of Czechoslovakia, normalization (Czech: normalizace, Slovak: normalizácia) is a name commonly given to the period following the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in August 1968 and up to the glasnost era of liberalization that began in the Soviet Union and its neighboring nations in 1987.

  7. History of Czechoslovakia (1948–1989) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › History_of_Czechoslovakia

    Although it was mostly a formality during the normalization period, Czechoslovakia had been federalized under the Constitutional Law of Federation of 27 October 1968. The newly created Federal Assembly (i.e., federal parliament), which replaced the National Assembly, was intended to work in close cooperation with the Czech National Council and ...

  8. Normalization (Czechoslovakia) wiki | TheReaderWiki

    thereaderwiki.com › en › Normalization_(Czechoslovakia)
    • 1969–1971
    • 1971–1987
    • Persons
    • Objectives
    • Reactions
    • Neonormalization
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    When Husák replaced Dubček as leader of the KSČ in April 1969, his regime acted quickly to "normalize" the country's political situation. The chief objectives of Husák's normalization were the restoration of firm party rule and the reestablishment of Czechoslovakia's status as a committed member of the socialist bloc. The normalization process involved five interrelated steps: 1. consolidate the Husák leadership and remove reformers from leadership positions; 2. revoke or modify the laws enacted by the reform movement; 3. reestablish centralized control over the economy; 4. reinstate the power of police authorities; and 5. expand Czechoslovakia's ties with other socialist nations. Within a week of assuming power, Husák began to consolidate his leadership by ordering extensive purges of reformists still occupying key positions in the mass media, judiciary, social and mass organizations, lower party organs, and, finally, the highest levels of the KSČ. In the fall of 1969, twenty-nine...

    The method by which the KSČ under Husák ruled was commonly summed up as "reluctant terror." It involved careful adherence to the Soviet Union's policy objectives and the use of what was perceived as the minimum amount of repression at home necessary to fulfill these objectives and prevent a return to Dubček-style reformism. The result was a regime that, while not a complete return to Stalinism, was far from being a liberal one either. The membership of the KSČ's Presidium changed very little after 1971. The Sixteenth Party Congress in 1981 reelected the incumbent members of the Presidium and Secretariat and elevated one candidate member, Milouš Jakeš, to full membership in the Presidium. The Seventeenth Party Congress in 1986 retained the incumbent Secretariat and Presidium and added three new candidate members to the Presidium. In March 1987, Josef Korčák retired from the Presidium and was replaced by Ladislav Adamec. At the same time, Hoffman, a Presidium member, was also appointe...

    A remarkable feature of the KSČ leadership under Husák was the absence of significant changes in personnel. The stability of the leadership during the late 1970s and the first half of the 1980s could be attributed not to unanimity in political opinion but rather to practical compromise among different factions vying to retain their leadership positions. Husák's leadership, then, was based not on any ability he may have had to rally opinion but rather on his skill in securing consensuses that were in the mutual interest of a coalition of party leaders. After the 1968 invasion, Husák successfully ruled over what was essentially a coalition of the conservative and hard-line factions within the top party leadership. (see KSČ-History for details)

    The official objectives of normalization (in the narrower sense) were the restoration of firm KSČ rule and the reestablishment of Czechoslovakia's position in the socialist bloc. Its result, however, was a political environment that placed primary emphasis on the maintenance of a stable party leadership and its strict control over the population.

    The absence of popular support for the Husák leadership was an inevitable reaction to the repressive policies instituted during the normalization process. Early post-invasion efforts to keep alive the spirit of the Prague Spring were quashed through a series of subversion trials in 1972 that led to jail sentences ranging from nine months to six and one-half years for the opposition leaders. Czechoslovak citizens over the age of fifteen were required to carry a small red identification book, containing an array of information about the individual and a number of pages to be stamped by employers, health officials, and other authorities. All citizens also had permanent files at the office of their local KSČ neighborhood committee, another at their place of employment, and another at the Ministry of Interior. The most common attitudes toward political activity since the 1968 Warsaw Pact invasion have been apathy, passivity, and escapism. For the most part, citizens of Czechoslovakia ret...

    Czech philosophers Václav Bělohradský and Stanislav Komárek use the term "neonormalization" (neonormalizace) for a stage of Czech society in the post-communist period, which is compared with the torpidity and hypocrisy of the 1970s and 1980s. Bělohradský in his book Společnost nevolnosti(Slon, 2007) calls "neonormalization" the direction since 1992 that all alternative opinions are crowded out, a culture shifts into the trash of entertainers, next the deepening of democracy is blocked, the public space is infested with right-wing ideology and Czech Republic participated in all sorts of nefarious wars. Komárek, a philosopher and biologist, in many his articles since 2006 popularizes his opinion that in certain stages of society development, the administrative and formalistic aspect (or the "power of mediocres") outweighs a common sense, creativity and utility,. Pressure for conformity intensely rises and everyone is obliged to "sell his soul" to keep up in social structures.This neon...

    This article incorporates public domain material from the Library of Congress Country Studies website http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/cs/.

  9. Normalization (Czechoslovakia) - Wikipedia

    cs.abcdef.wiki › wiki › Normalization_(Czechoslovakia)

    Normalizace (Československo) - Normalization (Czechoslovakia) z Wikipedie, otevřené encyklopedie. Část seriálu o: Československá socialistická republika ...

  10. History of Czechoslovakia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › History_of_Czechoslovakia

    Although Czechoslovakia was the only central European country to remain a parliamentary democracy during the entire period 1918 to 1938, it faced problems with ethnic minorities such as Hungarians, Poles and Sudeten Germans, which made up the largest part of the country's German minority.

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