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    • Pomeranian Voivodeship (1919–1939) - Wikipedia
      • From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Pomeranian Voivodeship or Pomorskie Voivodeship (Polish: Województwo Pomorskie) was an administrative unit of interwar Poland (from 1919–1939). It ceased to function in September 1939, following the German and Soviet invasion of Poland.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomeranian_Voivodeship_(1919–1939)
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    What is Pomeranian Voivodeship?

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    What is the Voivodeship of Pomerania?

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  2. Pomeranian Voivodeship - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Pomeranian_Voivodeship

    Pomeranian Voivodeship, Pomorskie Region, or Pomerania Province (Polish: województwo pomorskie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ pɔˈmɔrskʲɛ]), is a voivodeship, or province, in northwestern Poland. The provincial capital is Gdańsk.

    • 18,293 km² (7,063 sq mi)
    • Poland
  3. Pomeranian Voivodeship (1919–1939) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Pomeranian_Voivodeship

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Pomeranian Voivodeship or Pomorskie Voivodeship (Polish: Województwo Pomorskie) was an administrative unit of interwar Poland (from 1919–1939). It ceased to function in September 1939, following the German and Soviet invasion of Poland.

    • Interwar period
    • 28 powiats
  4. Pomeranian Voivodeship (1466–1772) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Pomeranian_Voivodeship
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    The Pomeranian Voivodeship was a unit of administrative division and local government in the Kingdom of Poland and the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1454/1466 until the First partition of Poland in 1772. From 1613 the capital was at Skarszewy. The name Pomerania derives from the Slavic po more, meaning "by the sea" or "on the sea".

    The voivodeship comprised the eastern lands of the historic Pomerania region, which since the Teutonic takeover of Gdańsk in 1308 had been held by the State of the Teutonic Order. After the 1454 uprising of the Prussian Confederation and the Thirteen Years' War, the area fell back to the Polish Crown according to the Second Peace of Thorn in 1466. Together with the Chełmno and Malbork voivodeships and the Prince-Bishopric of Warmia it formed the autonomous province of Royal Prussia. The ...

    Voivodeship Governor seat: 1. Skarszewy Regional council Starogard Gdański Regional councils Człuchów Tuchola Świecie Starogród Puck Administrative divisions: Człuchów County,, Człuchów Gdańsk County,, Gdańsk Koscierzyna County,, Kościerzyna Mirachowo County,, Mirachowo Nowe County,, Nowe Puck County,, Puck Skarszewy County,, 1. Skarszewy Stargard County, Starogard Gdański Świecie County,, Świecie Tczew County,, Tczew Tuchola County,, Tuchola From 1637 to 1657, the Lębork ...

  5. West Pomeranian Voivodeship - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › West_Pomeranian_Voivodeship
    • Overview
    • Geography and tourism
    • Cities and towns
    • Protected areas
    • Demography

    West Pomeranian Voivodeship or West Pomerania Province is a voivodeship in northwestern Poland. It borders on Pomeranian Voivodeship to the east, Greater Poland Voivodeship to the southeast, Lubusz Voivodeship to the south, the German federal-states of Mecklenburg-West Pomerania and Brandenburg to the west, and the Baltic Sea to the north. Its capital and largest city is Szczecin. It was established on January 1, 1999, out of the former Szczecin and Koszalin Voivodeships and parts of other neigh

    West Pomeranian Voivodeship is the fifth largest voivodeship of Poland in terms of area. Among the largest cities, of the region, are the capital Szczecin, as well as Koszalin, Stargard, and Świnoujście. This is a picturesque region of the Baltic Sea coast, with many beaches, lakes and woodlands. Szczecin, Świnoujście and Police are important ports. Other major seaside towns include Międzyzdroje, Dziwnów, Kołobrzeg, and Mielno. West Pomerania is considered one of the greenest regions ...

    The voivodeship contains 66 cities and towns. These are listed below in descending order of population: Szczecin Koszalin Stargard Kołobrzeg Świnoujście Szczecinek Police Wałcz Białogard Goleniów Gryfino Nowogard Gryfice Świdwin Choszczno Dębno Barlinek Darłowo Złocieniec Pyrzyce Sławno Drawsko Pomorskie Myślibórz Łobez Trzebiatów Kamień Pomorski Połczyn-Zdrój Chojna Czaplinek Sianów Karlino Międzyzdroje Borne Sulinowo Wolin Kalisz Pomorski Resko Bobolice Płoty Lipiany ...

    Protected areas in West Pomeranian Voivodeship include two National Parks and seven Landscape Parks. These are listed below. 1. Drawno National Park 2. Wolin National Park 3. Barlinek-Gorzów Landscape Park 4. Cedynia Landscape Park 5. Drawsko Landscape Park 6. Ińsko Landscape Park 7. Lower Odra Valley Landscape Park 8. Szczecin Landscape Park 9. Ujście Warty Landscape Park

    After Germany's defeat in World War II, the region became part of Poland by way of the Potsdam Agreement, which created territorial changes demanded by the Soviet Union. Most Germans fled or were expelled; the area was re-settled by Poles, most of whom had been expelled from the Polish areas annexed by the Soviet Union. In 1948 67 percent of the populace originated from Central Poland, Greater Poland and Pomeralia while 25 percent came from the Polish areas annexed by the Soviet Union. Another 6

    • 22,896 km² (8,840 sq mi)
    • Poland
  6. Pomeranian Voivodeship - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Pomeranian_Voivodeship

    From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Pomeranian Voivodeship is a voivodeship, or province, in northwestern Poland. The provincial capital is Gdańsk. The voivodeship was made on January 1, 1999, out of the former voivodeships of Gdańsk, Elbląg and Słupsk.

    • 18,293 km² (7,063 sq mi)
    • Gdańsk
    • 2,324,251
    • Poland
  7. Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › Kuyavian-Pomeranian_Voivodeship
    • Overview
    • History
    • Administration and territory
    • Cities and towns
    • Economy
    • Transportation

    Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, also known as Cuiavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship or simply Kujawsko-Pomorskie, or Kujawy-Pomerania Province is one of the 16 voivodeships into which Poland is divided. It was created on 1 January 1999 and is situated in mid-northern Poland, on the boundary between the two historic regions from which it takes its name: Kuyavia and Pomerania. Its two chief cities, serving as the province's joint capitals, are Bydgoszcz and Toruń.

    The Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship was created on 1 January 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms adopted in 1998. It consisted of territory from the former Bydgoszcz, Toruń and Włocławek Voivodeships. The area now known as Kuyavia-Pomerania was previously divided between the region of Kuyavia and the Polish fiefdom of Royal Prussia. Of the two principal cities of today's Kuyavian-Pomeranian voivodeship, one was historically located in Kuyavia, whilst the other was an ...

    The functions of regional capital are split between Bydgoszcz and Toruń. Bydgoszcz serves as the seat of the centrally appointed governor or voivode, while Toruń is the seat of the elected Regional Assembly, and of the executive elected by that assembly, headed by the voivodeship marshal. The Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship is bordered by five other voivodeships. These are Pomeranian Voivodeship to the north, Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship to the north-east, Masovian Voivodeship to the east ...

    The voivodeship contains 52 cities and towns. These are listed below in descending order of population

    The Gross domestic product of the province was 21.8 billion euros in 2018, accounting for 4.4% of Polish economic output. GDP per capita adjusted for purchasing power was 17,300 euros or 57% of the EU27 average in the same year. The GDP per employee was 64% of the EU average.

    Transportation infrastructure is of critical importance to the voivodeship's economy. Kuyavia-Pomerania is a major node in the Polish transportation system. Railway lines from the South and East pass through Bydgoszcz to connect to the major ports on the Baltic Sea. In addition to this, Bydgoszcz is home to the rolling stock manufacturer PESA SA, Poland's largest and most modern producer of railway and tram products. The province's sole international airport, Ignacy Jan Paderewski Airport, is lo

    • 17,969 km² (6,938 sq mi)
    • PL-04
  8. Brudzewo, Pomeranian Voivodeship - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Brudzewo,_Pomeranian

    Brudzewo was a royal village of the Polish Crown, administratively located in the Puck County in the Pomeranian Voivodeship. [2] During the German occupation of Poland ( World War II ), local teachers were among Polish teachers murdered in the Mauthausen concentration camp (see Intelligenzaktion ).

    • 212
    • Puck
  9. Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship - Simple English Wikipedia ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Kuyavian-Pomeranian

    Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship is one of the 16 voivodeships of Poland. The capitals are Bydgoszcz and Toruń. Administrative division. The Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship is divided into 23 counties : 4 city counties and 19 land counties. These are further divided into 144 gminas.

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