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  1. Hussites - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radical_Hussite

    The Hussites initially campaigned defensively, but after 1427 they assumed the offensive. Apart from their religious aims, they fought for the national interests of the Czechs. The moderate and radical parties were united, and they not only repelled the attacks of the army of crusaders but crossed the

  2. Radical Hussites - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radical_Hussites

    Radical Hussites is a designation for various Hussite groups including the Taborites, the Orebites, the Adamites, the Orphans and other groups. In contrast to Moderate Hussites, who made a compromise with the Catholic Church, Radical Hussites declined to make one and came to oppose both the Utraquists and the Catholic Church in the Hussite Wars between 1423 and 1434.

  3. Hussite Wars - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hussite_Wars

    The Hussite Wars, also called the Bohemian Wars or the Hussite Revolution, were a series of wars fought between the Christian Hussites and the combined Christian Catholic forces of Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund, the Papacy, European monarchs loyal to the Catholic Church, as well as various Hussite factions.

  4. Taborites - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taborite

    The Taborites (Czech Táborité, singular Táborita), known by their enemies as the Picards, were a Radical Hussite faction within the Hussite movement in medieval Lands of the Bohemian Crown. Although most of the Taborites were of rural origin, they played a major role in the city of Tábor's union.

  5. The Hussites initially campaigned defensively, but after 1427 they assumed the offensive. Apart from their religious aims, they fought for the national interests of the Czechs. The moderate and radical parties were united, and they not only repelled the attacks of the army of crusaders but crossed the

  6. Prague Hussites - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prague_Hussites

    Radical Hussite priests called for the Imperial corpses to rot on the field for three days, but the army of the Prague Hussites ignored it. The castle was sacked and on June 21, 1421, Hradcany Castle was also taken by the Prague Hussites and similarly ransacked.

  7. Jan Hus - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Hus

    Jan Hus (/ h ʊ s /; Czech: [ˈjan ˈɦus] (); c. 1372 – 6 July 1415), sometimes anglicized as John Hus or John Huss, and referred to in historical texts as Iohannes Hus or Johannes Huss, was a Czech theologian and philosopher who became a church reformer and an inspirer of Hussitism, a key predecessor to Protestantism and a seminal figure in the Bohemian Reformation.

  8. Jan Žižka - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Žižka

    Jan Žižka z Trocnova a Kalicha (Czech pronunciation: [ˈjan ˈʒɪʃka] (); German: Johann Ziska; English: John Zizka of Trocnov and the Chalice) (c. 1360 – 11 October 1424) was a Czech general, a contemporary and follower of Jan Hus, Hussite military leader, and later also a Radical Hussite who led the Taborites.

  9. Hussite | Article about Hussite by The Free Dictionary

    encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Hussite

    The more radical Hussites, the Taborites, named after their religious center and stronghold at Tabor, went further than the Utraquists in accepting the doctrines of John Wyclif. Consisting largely of peasants, this group expressed the messianic hopes of the oppressed. They regarded the Four Articles as minimal concessions.

  10. Războaiele Husite - Wikipedia

    ro.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Războaiele_Husite

    Hussites (1419–1420) of Pilsen; of Southern Bohemia; of Western Bohemia; Taborites; Hussite Coalition (1420–1423) Prague Hussites; Taborites; Orebites; Hussites of Žatec and Louny; Bohemian Hussite nobility; Hussite cities; Moravian Hussites; Radical Hussites (1423–1434) Taborites; Orebites (until 1424) Orphans (after 1424) Polish ...