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  1. Razakar (Pakistan) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Razakar_(Pakistan)

    Razakar ( Arabic: رضا کار ‎, Urdu: رضاکار ‎, literally "volunteer"; Bengali: রাজাকার) was an East Pakistani paramilitary force organised by the Pakistan Army in then East Pakistan, now called Bangladesh, during the Bangladesh Liberation War in 1971. Since the 1971 war, it has become a pejorative term (implying ...

    • 30000–40000
    • Khulna, Bangladesh
  2. Razakars (Pakistan) - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Razakars_(Pakistan)

    Razakars (Pakistan) Razakars was the name given to a paramilitary force organized by the Pakistan Army during the Bangladesh Liberation War in 1971. The word, originating from Persian, literally means "volunteer". It was composed of mostly pro- Pakistani Bengalis and Urdu -speaking migrants of the former East Pakistan (now Bangladesh ).

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    Who are the Razakars and what did they do?

    Who was the Razakar in the Bangladesh Liberation War?

    What does the word Razakar mean in Urdu?

    Who are the Police Qaumi Razakars in Pakistan?

  4. Razakar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Razakar

    Razakars were an East Pakistani paramilitary force that aided the Pakistan Army against the Mukti Bahini during the Bangladesh Liberation War. Police Qaumi Razakars are a volunteer force in Pakistan which aids the Police in their duties. In Hyderabad, Razakars were volunteers sponsored by the Nizam's state of Hyderabad for opposition to its ...

  5. Police Qaumi Razakars - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Police_Qaumi_Razakars

    Police Qaumi Razakars or Razakar (plu: Razakars) (Arabic for volunteer) is a volunteer force in Punjab province, Pakistan.Its duties include helping with the maintenance of law and order, by helping the police maintaining public security and natural calamities as may be prescribed.

  6. Razakars (Hyderabad) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Razakars_(Hyderabad)
    • Overview
    • History and war crimes
    • Types of Razakars
    • Annexation after Operation Polo
    • Disbandment

    The Razakars were a private militia organised by Qasim Razvi during the rule of Nizam Mir Mir Osman Ali Khan, Asaf Jah VII. They resisted the integration of Hyderabad State into the Dominion of India. They also had plans to make the Nizam accede his princely state to Pakistan instead of India. Eventually, the Indian Army routed the Razakars during Operation Polo. Qasim Razvi was initially jailed and then allowed to move to Pakistan where he was granted asylum, on an undertaking that he would mig

    The Hyderabad State was a kingdom that was ruled by the Nizam. When India became independent in 1947, like all the other Princely states, the Hyderabad State was also given the choice of either joining India or Pakistan. The Nizam wanted neither; he wanted to remain independent. The Nizam finally entered into a standstill agreement with India on 29 November 1947 to maintain the status quo. Hyderabad state had been steadily becoming more theocratic since the beginning of the 20th century. In 1926

    Quoting an article of K F Rustomjee, the former DGP of Maharashtra and BSF, Captain Panduranga Reddy said that the policemen from Akola district in then Central Province were sent in to Hyderabad state in the garb of Razakars to create turmoil and blame the Nizam government. Rustomjee was SP of Akola at the time. Captain Reddy called the Communists as traitors, who encouraged violence to spread their agenda. 1. General

    Finally, Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, the Indian Minister for Home Affairs, decided to undertake "police action" in Hyderabad State to force the King Nizam's hand. Operation Polo was launched and the Indian Army, led by Major General J. N. Chaudhuri, entered the state from five directions. The Razakars fought briefly against the overwhelming attack by Indian forces before surrendering on 18 September 1948. Mir Laik Ali, the Prime Minister of the Nizam, and Qasim Rizvi were arrested. On 22 September

    The Razakars were disbanded after the merger of Hyderabad with India and the Majlis-e-Ittehadul Muslimeen was banned—though it was rechartered under the Congress government as All India MIM in 1957. Qasim Rizvi was jailed and served in Indian prisons for almost a decade. He was released only on an undertaking that he would migrate to Pakistan within forty-eight hours of his release. He was granted asylum in Pakistan.

  7. রাজাকার - উইকিপিডিয়া

    bn.wikipedia.org › wiki › Razakars_(Pakistan)

    আপনি সংযুক্ত নন; আলাপ; অবদান; অ্যাকাউন্ট তৈরি করুন; প্রবেশ করুন

  8. Razakars (Pakistan) | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Razakars_(Pakistan)
    • Creation
    • Organisation
    • Dissolution
    • Trial
    • External Links
    • See Also
    • References

    Journalist Azadur Rahman Chandan describes his book that Abul Kalam Mohammad Yusuf, Nayeb-e-Ameer of Jamaat-e Islami, first formed the Razakar force in Khulna. He was also the convener of the Peace Committee in the district. Under his leadership, 96 Razakar members used to torment freedom fighters and pro-Liberation War people at nine torture cells in the town. They were later taken to four killing grounds and executed. A minister in the Dr Malek cabinet, AKM Yusuf also campaigned at home and abroad against the war. The East Pakistan Razakar Ordinance promulgated on 1 June 1971 by the Governor of East Pakistan, Lieutenant General Tikka Khan. The Ordinance stipulates the creation of a voluntary force to be trained and equipped by the Provincial Government. This was to add to the government's forces to suppress the rebellion of people who wanted independence for the region. It is also alleged that Razakars were recruited by the Shanti Committee, which was formed by several pro-Pakista...

    Together with the Al-Badr and Al-Shams paramilitary forces, the Razakar were under Pakistani Army command and also trained by them (see external link section). In September 1971, the Razakar force was placed under the command of Major General Mohammed Jamshed. Organisational command of the Razakar was given to Abdur Rahim who was trained at the Office of Public Safety. (This organisation had been assisted by USAID.)The Razakar force was organised into brigades of around 3000-4000 volunteers, mainly armed with Light Infantry weapons provided by the Pakistani Army. Each Razakar Brigade was attached as an auxiliary to two Pakistani Regular Army Brigades, and their main function was to arrest and detain nationalist Bengali suspects. There were allegations that such suspects were tortured during custody[citation needed]. The Razakars were trained by the Pakistan Army. While formed as a paramilitary group, the Razakars served as the local guides for the Pakistan army. Both organisations w...

    Following the surrender of the West Pakistan army on 16 December 1971 and the proclamation of independence of Bangladesh, the Razakar units were dissolved. The Jamaat party was banned, as it had opposed independence. Many leading Razakars fled to Pakistan (previously West Pakistan)[citation needed].Waves of violence followed the official end of the war, and many lower-ranking Razakars were killed in reprisals by the winning side.[citation needed]The government rounded up and imprisoned an estimated 36,000 men suspected of being Razakars. The government ultimately freed many of those held in jail, both in response to pressure from the United States and China, who backed Pakistan in the war, and to gain cooperation from Pakistan in releasing people held there. It was holding 200,000 Bengali-speaking military and civilian personnel who had been stranded in West Pakistan during the war.

    In 2010 the Bangladesh government, led by the Awami League, set up an International Crimes Tribunal based on based on International Crimes Tribunal Act 1973 to prosecute the people who committed war crimes and crimes against humanities during the liberation war in 1971.Several trials were concluded in early 2013: Abul Kalam Azad was convicted of eight charges and sentenced to death in January 2013. Abdul Quader Mollah was convicted of five of six charges and sentenced to life imprisonment in February 2013. Delwar Hossain Sayeedi, the Nayeb-e-Ameer of Jamaat, was convicted of eight charges of war crimes and sentenced to death for two of them in February 2013.However, the trial process has been termed as "politically motivated" by its critics, while the human rights groups recognized the tribunal as falling short of international standards.

    Peace Committee
    Fazlul Qadir Chaudhry
    International Crimes Tribunal Timeline

    ^ Chandan, Azadur Rahman (February 2011) [2009]. একাত্তরের ঘাতক ও দালালরা [The Killers and Collaborators of 71] (Revised 2nd ed.). Dhaka: Jatiya Sahitya Prakash. pp. 48–54. ISBN 984-70000-0121-4. 1. volunteers and Collaborators of 1971: An Account of Their Whereabouts, compiled and published by the Center for the Development of the Spirit of the Liberation War.

  9. Bagbati massacre - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Bagbati_massacre

    Bagbati massacre (Bengali: বাগবাটি গণহত্যা) refers to the cold blooded killings of more than 200 unarmed Bengali by the Al Badar, Pakistan Army, Razakars and Peace Committee and in the Bagbati Union of Sirajganj sub-division in the erstwhile district of greater Pabna in May 1971.

  10. Razakar (Pakistan) | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Razakar_(Pakistan)
    • Creation
    • Organisation
    • Dissolution
    • Trials
    • List of War Crimes
    • Notable Confirmed Razakar Members
    • Currently in Pakistan
    • See Also
    • External Links
    • Further Reading

    The East Pakistan Razakar Ordinance promulgated on 1 June 1971 by the Governor of East Pakistan, Lieutenant General Tikka Khan. The Ordinance stipulated the creation of a voluntary force to be trained and equipped by the Provincial Government. This was to add to the government's forces to suppress the rebellion of people who wanted independence for the region. It is also alleged that Razakars were recruited by the Shanti Committee, which was formed by several pro-Pakistani leaders including Nurul Amin, Ghulam Azam and Khwaja Khairuddin. The first recruits included 96 Jamaatparty members, who started training in an Ansar camp at Shahjahan Ali Road, Khulna.

    The Razakars had two branches they were Al-Badr and Al-Shams paramilitary forces.[citation needed] Students from Madrasahs were inducted into Al-Badr for specialized operations while Al-Shams was tasked with protection of important strategic locations. The Razakar were under Pakistani Army command and also trained by them (see external link section). In September 1971, the Razakar force was placed under the command of Major General Mohammed Jamshed.Organisational command of the Razakar was given to Abdur Rahim. The Razakar force was organised into brigades of around 3000-4000 volunteers, mainly armed with light Infantry weapons provided by the Pakistani Army. Each Razakar Brigade was attached as an auxiliary to two Pakistani Regular Army Brigades, and their main function was to arrest and detain nationalist Bengali suspects. Suspects were tortured during custody and killed. The Razakars were trained by the Pakistan Army. While formed as a paramilitary group, the Razakars also served...

    Following the surrender of the West Pakistan army on 16 December 1971 and the proclamation of independence of Bangladesh, the Razakar units were dissolved. The Jamaat party was banned, as it had opposed independence. Many leading Razakars fled to Pakistan (previously West Pakistan)[citation needed]. Waves of violence followed the official end of the war, and some lower-ranking Razakars were killed in reprisals by Mukti Bahini militia.The government rounded up and imprisoned an estimated 36,000 men suspected of being Razakars. The government ultimately freed many of those held in jail, both in response to pressure from the United States and China, who backed Pakistan in the war, and to gain cooperation from Pakistan in obtaining the release of 200,000 Bengali-speaking military and civilian personnel who had been stranded or imprisoned in West Pakistan during the war. In Pakistan today, "Razakars" is used in reference to an auxiliary police force, the Police Qaumi Razakars.

    In 2010 the Bangladesh government, led by the Awami League, set up an International Crimes Tribunal based on the International Crimes Tribunal Act 1973 to prosecute the people who committed war crimes and crimes against humanities during the liberation warin 1971. Several trials were concluded in early 2013: Abul Kalam Azad was convicted of eight charges and sentenced to death in January 2013. Abdul Quader Mollah was convicted of five of six charges and sentenced to death in December 2013. Delwar Hossain Sayeedi, the Nayeb-e-Ameer of Jamaat, was convicted of eight charges of war crimes and sentenced to death for two of them in February 2013.However, the trial process has been termed as "politically motivated" by its critics, while the human rights groups recognized the tribunal as falling short of international standards.

    The Razakar forces violated Geneva Conventions of Warby killing, raping, murdering and looting the civilians.

    AKM Yusuf, the lead organizer.
    Forkan Mallik, a Razakar commander, convicted of rapes and forceful conversions in Mirzaganj, Patuakhali.

    In Pakistan today, the term "Razakars" is used in reference to the Police Qaumi Razakars, who aid the police in their duties.

    East Pakistan Central Peace Committee
    International Crimes Tribunal Timeline
    Chandan, Azadur Rahman (February 2011) [2009]. একাত্তরের ঘাতক ও দালালরা [The Killers and Collaborators of 71] (Revised 2nd ed.). Dhaka: Jatiya Sahitya Prakash. pp. 48–54.
    volunteers and Collaborators of 1971: An Account of Their Whereabouts, compiled and published by the Center for the Development of the Spirit of the Liberation War.