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  1. Rusyn language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rusyn_language

    Since 1995, Rusyn has been recognized as a minority language in Slovakia, enjoying the status of an official language in municipalities where more than 20 percent of the inhabitants speak Rusyn. [24] Rusyn is listed as a protected language by the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages in Slovakia , Serbia , Croatia and Romania .

  2. Rusyn is spoken in the Transcarpathian Region of Ukraine, in northeastern Slovakia, in Vojvodina, in southeastern Poland, in Hungary and in northern Romania. In Serbia, Rusyn is an official minority language. Since 1995, Rusyn has been an official minority language in Slovakia. In some Slovak municipalities, it is an official language.

  3. Pannonian Rusyn - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pannonian_Rusyn

    Pannonian Rusyn, or simply Rusyn (руски язик (ruski jazik), руска бешеда (ruska bešeda), русински язик [citation needed] (rusinski jazik); or Ruthenian), is an East Slavic language spoken by the Pannonian Rusyns, in north-western Serbia (Bačka region) and eastern Croatia.

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  5. Rusyns - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rusyns

    In 2007, Carpatho-Rusyns were recognized as a separate ethnicity in Ukraine by the Zakarpattia Oblast Council on a regional level, and in 2012 the Rusyn language gained official regional status in certain areas of the province, as well as nationwide based on the 2012 Law of Ukraine, "On the principles of the state language policy". However ...

    • 638–10,531
    • 33,482
    • 14,246
    • 10,183–32,386
  6. Rusyn - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rusyn

    Lemkian Rusyn people, a branch of Rusyn or Ukrainian people; Rusyn language, an East Slavic language Pannonian Rusyn language, a variant of Rusyn language; Lemkian Rusyn language, a variant of Rusyn language; Rusyn Voivodeship, a historical province from 15th to 18th century; Rusyn Byzantine Catholic Church, a particular Eastern Catholic Church

  7. Lemkos - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemkian_Rusyn_language

    The spoken language of the Lemkos, which has a code of rue under ISO 639-3, has been variously described as a language in its own right, a dialect of Rusyn or a dialect of Ukrainian. In Ukraine, almost all Lemkos speak both Lemko and standard Ukrainian (according to the 2001 Ukrainian Census).

    • 11,000 (census, 2011)
    • 55,469 (Rusyns)
    • 672
  8. Ruthenian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruthenian_language

    Ruthenian or Old Ruthenian (also see other names) was the group of varieties of East Slavic spoken in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and later in the East Slavic territories of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.

  9. Ruthenians - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruthenians

    The single category of people who listed their ethnicity as Rusyn was created in the 1920s, however, no generally accepted standardised Rusyn language existed. [23] After World War II, following the practice in the Soviet Union, Ruthenian ethnicity was disallowed.

  10. Rusyn Americans - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rusyn_American

    The Carpatho-Rusyn Society has purchased the historic former Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Munhall, Pennsylvania to convert it into the nation's first National Carpatho-Rusyn Cultural Center. The historic structure was the first cathedral in America exclusively for Carpatho-Rusyns.

  11. Ukrainian alphabet - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukrainian_alphabet

    Compared to other Cyrillic alphabets, the modern Ukrainian alphabet is most similar to those of the other East Slavic languages: Belarusian, Russian, and Rusyn. It has retained the two early Cyrillic letters і (i) and izhe ( и ) to represent related sounds /i/ and /ɪ/ as well as the two historical forms e ( е ) and ye ( є ).

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