Yahoo Web Search

  1. People also ask

    What Empire came into conflict with the Hittite Empire?

    What is the history of the Hittite Empire?

    What is the prehistoric period of Cyprus?

    Who invaded the Hittite Empire?

  2. Prehistoric Cyprus - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prehistoric_Cyprus

    Cyprus was a part of the Hittite empire but was a client state and as such was not invaded but rather merely part of the empire by association and governed by the ruling kings of Ugarit. As such Cyprus was essentially "left alone with little intervention in Cypriot affairs". [11]

  3. Hittites - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hittite_Empire

    By the end of the Hittite Empire, the Hittite language had become a written language of administration and diplomatic correspondence. The population of most of the Hittite Empire by this time spoke Luwian, another Indo-European language of the Anatolian family that had originated to the west of the Hittite region.

  4. The History Of The Hittite Civilization And Empire - About ...

    about-history.com/the-history-of-the-hittite...

    Despite Hittite warnings, many Assyrian campaigns were launched into Hittite lands destabilizing the empire. The situation only escalated when the “Sea People” arrived and plundered much of Syria, Cyprus, Asia Minor and Egypt.

  5. The Hittite Empire – Brewminate

    brewminate.com/the-hittite-empire
    • Geographical Background
    • The Hittite Achievement
    • Historical Background
    • Religion
    • History

    Hittite Empire, 1800-1200 BCE Most of Asia Minor is covered by a highland plateau which is criss-crossed by deep river valleys. On this highland the climate is cold in winter and scorching in summer, and the terrain is mostly covered by a barren steppe landscape. The river valleys, however, are well-watered and fertile, able to support comparatively dense populations. They were not on nearly the same scale as the valleys of the Nile, in Egypt, and the Euphrates, in Mesopotamia, and did not give rise to the huge irrigation systems of those lands, feeding millions of people, but they were able to support a mixed arable and pastural farming economy. At the beginning of the 2nd millennium BC the material culture of the societies of the Middle East was at the Bronze Age level. However, because bronze was expensive, it was used mainly in weapons, armour, art and jewellery. It was not widely used in farming, which was still at a Stone Age level of technology. This did not matter in the gre...

    Hattusa City Gate What the Hittites did succeed in doing was to create a large-scale and long-lasting state out of these unpromising circumstances, an empire which united disparate peoples within a single political system, and formed a highly effective regional power. The Hittite kingdom was at times one of the largest and most powerful in the Middle East, able to compete on more than equal terms with the other great powers of the region, Babylonia, Assyria, the Mitanni and Egypt. Theirs was an aggressive, militaristic state; but to conquer and hold territory for several generations the Hittites had to do more than win battles. They had to develop practical political arrangements that enabled them to rule a wide territory where transport was neither quick nor easy. They had to provide their subjects with a consistent set of laws under which people of differing customs could live in harmony (the Hittite legal system was more humane than those of many contemporary societies). And they...

    The Hittite civilization which emerged in the late 18th century BC was a hybrid one. The Hittites had mingled with the previous inhabitants of the area, the Hatti, to form a distinctive fusion of language and culture. Their close relatives, the Luwians and Hurrians, would also contribute important elements. Finally, contacts with the other great civilizations of the region, Mesopotamia and Egypt, would also help to shape Hittite civilization. The Hittites had created a strong kingdom in north-central Asia Minor by the end of the 18th century BC, which rose to its height of power in the 14th and 13th centuries BC. Hittite power was finally destroyed at the end of the 13th century, though much of Hittite culture lived on in a number of “Neo-Hittite” kingdoms in southwestern Asia Minor and northern Syria.

    Hittite relief sculptures of Gods at the Yazilikaya Sancutary The religions of Bronze Age Asia Minor, like most religions of the ancient world, were polytheistic by nature. They were closely related with one another, with the weather god being of particular importance amongst the many deities worshipped (perhaps reflecting the harsh climactic conditions of much of the country). Amongst the Hittites, however, the Sun goddess was apparently the most important deity; she was the goddess of battle, and the patron deity of the Hittite kings. The weather god took second place; he was her consort, and the god of battle. The Hittites did not interfere with the religious practices and beliefs of their subjects peoples, and each maintained their own local shrines to their deities (all these cults were polytheistic). The Hittites in fact enlisted the most important of the cults into the state religion. To this effect the king assumed the role of chief priest in these cults, and each year did a...

    Agriculture and urban civilization had come early to Asia Minor. In the mid- to late-3rd millennium BC Asia Minor was convulsed by a general upheaval as peoples speaking Indo-European languages migrated into the region from both Europe, in the northwest, and from the Caucuses, to the northeast. Amongst them were probably the ancestors of the Hittites, together with their close relatives, the Luwians and Hurrians. A few centuries of recovery allowed urban civilization to spread again into the region, but another general upheaval afflicted Asia Minor around the mid-18th century BC. By this time, the Hittites and other Indo-European peoples were well-established in Anatolia, as well as in other parts of the Middle East, and it was these groups who emerged from the time of troubles as the rulers of several small kingdoms. They were probably helped in this by a new military technology spreading down from their Indo-European cousins from the steppes, the chariot.

  6. THE HITTITES | Weapons and Warfare

    weaponsandwarfare.com/2019/05/29/the-hittites-2

    May 29, 2019 · In Anatolia, the Hittite infantry were well suited to counter the troublesome Gasgans in the rugged terrain of the Empire’s periphery. The duties of Hittite scouts included eliminating enemy scouts. A Ugaritic fleet landed a Hittite force to attack Cyprus. The Hittite first arrived in Anatolia around the time of 2000 B.C.

  7. The Hittites - Rise And Fall Of An Ancient Powerful Empire In ...

    www.ancientpages.com/2019/02/18/the-hittites...

    Feb 18, 2019 · The Assyrians much of the Hittite Empire, while the rest was sacked by the Phrygians. This forced the Hittites to split into several independent "Neo-Hittite" city-states, some of which survived until the 8th century B.C before succumbing to the Neo-Assyrian Empire. The Hittite Empire is long gone, but their legacy is still kept alive.

  8. Hittite new empire (1430 – 1200 BC) | Short history website

    www.shorthistory.org/ancient-civilizations/...

    Nov 26, 2015 · The last written report was about Hittite ruler Suppiluliuma II, who came to the throne around 1210 BC, but the length of his reign cannot be reconstructed. A large number of Hittite sites suffered devastation at the end of XIII and the beginning of the XII century. Hittite capital city Hattusha was burned down in the great fire.

  9. The Hittites - TimeMaps

    www.timemaps.com/civilizations/the-hittites
    • Introduction
    • Government
    • Society and Economy
    • Religion
    • Culture
    • History

    The Hittites were a people who built a remarkable civilization in ancient Asia Minor. Unlike contemporary Middle Eastern peoples in Mesopotamia or Egypt, they did not live in a great river valley, and therefore did not have the benefit of large-scale, highly productive irrigation agriculture on which to build their civilization. What they did benefit from was cultural influences coming in from Mesopotamia and Egypt, via Syria, and it was these influences which enabled them to build their own civilization.

    The King

    As with most, probably all, states of the Bronze Age, the Hittite governing institutions revolved around the king. In early Hittite times, the kings’ hold on power seem to have not been very secure. There were frequent rebellions, and in particular, the death of a king seems generally to have heralded political crisis. The nobles were a powerful class, and jealous of their ancient privileges. This made for tension, and frequently conflict, between them and the kings, whose interests lay in ce...

    Administration

    The Hittite realm consisted of a homeland surrounded by a growing cluster of kingdoms owing allegiance to the Great King in Hattusa, the Hittite capital. Within the Hittite homeland, most towns and other communities had councils of local elders to look after their affairs. It was also their role to liaise with local Hittite governors or military officers. In the religious centres, the high priest also acted as the civil governor of the community. As the kingdom expanded, more and more conquer...

    Law

    The Hittites paid a great deal of attention to legal matters. This was perhaps because their kingdom united under one rule a disparate group of local societies, each with their own customs, and the Hittite rulers therefore had to provide a code of laws by which to adjudicate issues which arose between people from different localities. Several collections of Hittite laws have been uncovered, each slightly different form one another. They probably reflect different stages of the development, an...

    Society

    At the top of Hittite society were the King and his kinsmen – members of the “Great Family” who enjoyed special status and privileges. They filled the highest offices of state, such as chiefs of the bodyguard, chief of the courtiers, chief of the wine pourers, chief of the treasurers, chief of the sceptre-bearers, and chief of the overseers of a thousand. In particular they held the top military commands. Under them came a host of courtiers, bodyguards, grooms, cup-bearers, sceptre-men, overs...

    Economy

    The Hittites engaged in a lucrative trade with neighbouring lands, particularly with the wealthy urban societies of Mesopotamia. Asia Minor was rich in metals, and they traded copper, silver and iron in exchange for luxury textiles and jewellery from Mesopotamia, tin from Iran and Europe, and olive oil from Cyprus. Their smiths also manufactured bronze objects with tin. Hittite society included a small class of professional craftsmen – builders, weavers, leather-workers, potters and smiths ar...

    The Family

    The Hittite family was of the usual patriarchal type found in most pre-modern societies. The husband’s power over his wife was implicit in the marriage ceremony, where the bridegroom ‘takes’ his wife and thereafter ‘possesses’ her. However, Hittite women had more rights than their sisters in other ancient societies. For example, they had the right to be associated with their husbands in choosing husbands for their daughter, and on the death of a wife her dowry only became the property of her...

    The religions of Bronze Age Asia Minor, like most religions of the ancient world, were polytheistic by nature. They were closely related with one another, with the weather god being of particular importance amongst the many deities worshipped (perhaps reflecting the harsh climactic conditions of much of the country). Amongst the Hittites, however, the Sun goddess was apparently the most important deity; she was the goddess of battle, and the patron deity of the Hittite kings. The weather god took second place; he was her consort, and the god of battle. The Hittites did not interfere with the religious practices and beliefs of their subjects peoples, and each maintained their own local shrines to their deities (all these cults were polytheistic). The Hittites in fact enlisted the most important of the cults into the state religion. To this effect the king assumed the role of chief priest in these cults, and each year did a ‘progress’ of the four chief shrines within his realm, each l...

    Language and writing

    Two languages were used for official documents, Hittite and Akkadian. The only other commonly used written language within the Hittite realm was Hurrian, for commercial purposes. Hittite was written in two scripts. Hieroglyphic Hittite, which was developed by the Hittites as a result of their acquaintance with Egyptian hieroglyphics, was used almost exclusively in rock carvings and inscription in stone monuments. The only exception was occasionally on official seals. This was one of several n...

    Art

    In the Old Hittite kingdom, the major artistic product was fine hand-made pottery, vessels of a variety of different kinds, painted with geometric designs which show links to finds of previous periods in Asia Minor history. By the time of the empire metal seems to have largely displaced pottery, and the only ware is the plain domestic type. The empire period saw the rise of monumental stone bas-reliefs, often associated with hieroglyphic texts, carved either on stone blocks on the fronts of H...

    Literature

    Hittite literature is composed of myths, annals, royal decrees, charters, deeds and curses (which are also common in Babylonian and Assyrianliterature). There were only a small number of myths, and these were of no great literary merit. Most are couched in the simplest prose, though the stories themselves are of considerable interest. For example a series of myths concern a god who goes missing and as a result the earth suffers through some natural disaster due to his or her protective care b...

    Agriculture and urban civilization had come early to Asia Minor. In the mid- to late-3rd millennium BCE Asia Minor was convulsed by a general upheaval as peoples speaking Indo-European languagesmigrated into the region from both Europe, in the northwest, and from the Caucuses, to the northeast. Amongst them were probably the ancestors of the Hittites, together with their close relatives, the Luwians and Hurrians. A few centuries of recovery allowed urban civilization to spread again into the region, but another general upheaval afflicted Asia Minor around the mid-18th century BCE. By this time, the Hittites and other Indo-European peoples were well-established in Anatolia, as well as in other parts of the Middle East, and it was these groups who emerged from the time of troubles as the rulers of several small kingdoms. They were probably helped in this by a new military technology spreading down from their Indo-European cousins from the steppes, the chariot.

  10. The top 10 archaeological finds in Turkey and North Cyprus in ...

    ahvalnews.com/archaeology/top-10-archaeological...

    Dec 25, 2020 · It seems that the Hittite Empire had started construction of a large fortified city project that controlled the "Northern Levant Corridor" between the Amanos and the Kurt mountains. The city, understood to be linked to the Yesemek Sculpture Workshop and Stone Quarry, is a new and very important discovery.

  11. People also search for