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      • Prague was a city in the territory of military and political control of the Soviet Union (see Iron Curtain). The largest Stalin Monument was unveiled on Letná hill in 1955 and destroyed in 1962. The 4th Czechoslovak Writers' Congress held in the city in June 1967 took a strong position against the regime.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prague
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  2. Prague - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Prague

    Prague was a city in the territory of military and political control of the Soviet Union (see Iron Curtain). The largest Stalin Monument was unveiled on Letná hill in 1955 and destroyed in 1962. The 4th Czechoslovak Writers' Congress held in the city in June 1967 took a strong position against the regime.

    • 7th century
    • 100 00 – 199 00
  3. Prague | History, Geography, Culture, & Facts | Britannica

    www.britannica.com › place › Prague

    Prague, city, capital of the Czech Republic. Lying at the heart of Europe, it is one of the continent’s finest cities and the major Czech economic and cultural center. The city has a rich architectural heritage and numerous physical attractions and landmarks.

  4. Prague | Definition of Prague at Dictionary.com

    www.dictionary.com › browse › prag

    noun a city in and the capital of the Czech Republic, in the western central part, on the Vltava: formerly capital of Czechoslovakia.

  5. New Town, Prague - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › New_Town,_Prague

    The New Town is a quarter in the city of Prague in the Czech Republic. New Town is the youngest and largest of the five independent towns that today comprise the historic center of modern Prague. New Town was founded in 1348 by Charles IV just outside the city walls to the east and south of the Old Town and encompassed an area of 7.5 km²; about three times the size of the Old Town. The population of Prague in 1378 was well over 40,000, perhaps as much as twice that, making it the 4th most ...

  6. Prague - Jewish Virtual Library

    www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org › prague
    • Early History
    • Prague Renaissance
    • World War II
    • Post-World War II
    • Jewish Community Today
    • Jewish Tourist Sites

    Documentary evidence reveals that Jews have lived in Prague since 970 C.E. By the end of the 11thcentury, a Jewish community had been fully established. In the late 11th and early 12th centuries, the Jews of Prague suffered great persecution: first, in 1096, at the hands of the Crusaders, and second, during the siege of the Prague Castle in 1142. During the siege, the oldest synagogue in Prague and sections of the Jewish quarter on the left side of the Vltava (Moldau) River near the castle were burned down. Many survivors of the crusades were forced to convert to Christianity. In 1179, the church announced that Christians should avoid touching Jews. In this period, civil rights granted to Jews were severely limited and they were forced to build their community on the right bank of the Vltava, close to Staromestske Namesti, the Old Town Square. This limited their movements and identified them as a minority group. This was the origin of the Jewish ghetto. By day movement was free, but...

    The 16thcentury is considered to be the age of the Prague Renaissance. The ghetto became a center of Jewish mysticism. Artisans and intellectuals came from all over Europe and congregated in Prague. For the most part Jews were isolated from the “high” culture outside their community, however, a number of Jews became mathematicians, astronomers, geographers, historians, philosophers and artists and participated in the Renaissance. In 1501, the landed nobility, called the Bohemian Lantag, reaffirmed the ancient privileges of the Jews of Prague and fostered an open atmosphere for economic activity. From 1522 to 1541, the Jewish population of Prague almost doubled; many Jewish refugees, who were expelled from Moravia, Germany, Austria and Spain, came to Prague. The Jewish Quarter officially became the ghetto, however, its transition was not marked by any known legislation. During this period, the ghetto expanded because Jews were given permission to acquire lands adjacent to the ghetto...

    On March 14, 1939, Slovakia declared independence from Prague and signed the Treaty of Protection with Nazi Germany. The next day, Germany occupied Czech lands. At the outbreak of World War II, over 92,000 Jews lived in Prague, almost 20 percent of the city’s population. Prague was one of the largest Jewish communities in Europe. At least two-thirds of the Jewish population of Prague perished in the Holocaust. In the Czech Republic, about 26,000 members of the Czech Jewish community escaped and emigrated to various countries and regions, including Palestine, the United States, South America and Western Europe. Not all Czech Jews were so fortunate. Of the vast majority of Czech Jews that were imprisoned in Terezin, 80 percent of those were deported to Auschwitz, Maidanek, Treblinka and Sobibor. Other Czech Jews were sent directly to death camps. Over 97,000 perished, of which 15,000 were Czech Jewish children. Only 132 of those children were known to have survived. More than a quarte...

    Following the war, about 15,000 Czech Jews remained. By 1950, half of them emigrated to Israel. On May 9, 1945, as Germany was being defeated, the Soviet Red Army entered Prague. A provisional government was installed, but the Soviet presence enabled the Communist party to gain influence. In February 1948, the provisional government was ousted, and the Communist Party took power. From 1948 to 1949, the Soviet block supported the newly created State of Israel and therefore allowed Jews in the Czech Republic to immigrateto Israel. However, following 1949, emigration was virtually impossible and Jewish life was stifled by the Communist regime. Under pressure from Stalin, its leaders were soon encouraged to stamp out religious and cultural activity, including Judaism. The regime demolished around 90 synagogues and dozens of Jewish cemeteries were shut down. In 1952, Rudolf Slansky, then general secretary of the Czech Communist Party, and 13 others were accused of being disloyal elements...

    Today, the Federation of Jewish Communities says about 3,000 to 5,000 people are registered members of the Jewish community in the Czech Republic, of which 1,600 live in Prague. Numbers are difficult to calculate due to decades of intermarriage and emigration. It is estimated that there are an additional 10,000 to 15,000 unregistered Jews living in the contry. A revival of Jewish life is occurring. Many Jews found it easier to be quiet and hide their identity during the Communist era and so many people learned of being Jewish only after 1989. The average age in Prague’s Jewish community has dropped from 70 (the average age in the 1980s) to about 55 because of increased involvement of younger Jews. There are a number of secularJewish organizations that fall under the auspices of the FJC, including the Union of Jewish Youth, a branch of the World Union of Jewish Students, sporting clubs Maccabi and Hakoach, the Women’s Zionist Organization, and the Terezin Initiative, a non-profit tha...

    Prague is filled with many Jewish historical sites that give testament to its rich past as one of the centers of Jewish life. Many of these can be found in Josefov, site of the Jewish ghetto and village. A popular tourist site, the Hebrew and Roman faced clocks,(the clock with the Hebrew letters turns counterclockwise) can be found on the offices of the Jewish Community Federation of the Czech Republic and the Jewish Town Hall. The Jewish Town Hall was built in the 16th century by the Jewish mayor of Josefov. Today, it serves as the center of the Jewish community in Prague and houses the offices of the Federation of Jewish Communities in the Czech Lands. There are two kosher restaurants in Prague. Shalom, which is located within the Town Hall, and the King Salomon Restauranton Siroka Street opposite the entrance to the Pinkas synagogue. A life-sized bust in black bronze of Franz Kafka on the corner of U Radnice and Maiselova marks the place where he was born on July 3, 1883. In 1991...

  7. Was Prague always a Czech-speaking city? - Quora

    www.quora.com › Was-Prague-always-a-Czech-speaking

    Nov 10, 2017 · Yes, Prague has been founded by the Czech tribes sometime before 900 and has remained Czech-speaking since. However, since the Kingdom of Bohemia was a part of the German-speaking Holy Roman Empire, Prague has also attracted a vibrant German-speak...

  8. When was Prague founded? - Quora

    www.quora.com › When-was-Prague-founded

    Dec 23, 2019 · According to Old Czech Legends, Prophet Ms Libuše (Latin: Lubossa, yes, it’s a female version of Luboš) made a prediction “Listen, I see a city here whose fame reaches the heaven”.

  9. Prague, Oklahoma - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Prague,_Oklahoma

    Prague / ˈpreɪɡ / is a city in southeastern Lincoln County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,386 at the 2010 census, an 11.6 percent increase from 2,138 at the 2000 census. Czech immigrants founded the city, and named it for the present-day capital of the Czech Republic with an altered pronunciation of the name.

  10. New Prague, Minnesota - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › New_Prague,_Minnesota

    New Prague was incorporated as a city on April 4, 1891. New Prague Flouring Milling Company completed its mill in 1895. Electric lights were installed in the city in 1895, and telephone lines were installed in 1898. Similar to the rest of the state, the 1880s and 1890s were two decades with the greatest growth in population.

  11. Why was Prague not destroyed in World War 2? - Answers

    www.answers.com › Q › Why_was_Prague_not_destroyed

    First, because a High Nazi was living in Prague and secondly, the Nazi wanted to make of Prague, "a museum of a defunct race", thus they preserved the city "In one of the most grotesquely ironic ...