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  1. What is Reformed Theology? | GotQuestions.org

    www.gotquestions.org/reformed-theology.html

    Jan 02, 2020 · Other distinctives of Reformed theology generally include the observance of two sacraments (baptism and communion), a cessationist view of the spiritual gifts (the gifts are no longer extended to the church), and a non-dispensational view of Scripture.

  2. Summarizing Distinctives of Reformed Faith and Practice – Joy ...

    cameronshaffer.com/2020/09/28/summarizing...

    Sep 28, 2020 · The Reformed are Reformed Catholics (in distinction to Roman or Eastern Orthodox Catholics) and fully embrace the Catholic tradition expressed in the Apostles’, Nicene, Chalcedonian, and Athanasian creeds. To be Catholic is to affirm and submit to Nicene Christianity as biblical Christianity.

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  4. Essential Tenets and Reformed Distinctives

    www.fpcmoorestown.org/hp_wordpress/wp-content/...

    the Christian faith and of our Reformed distinctives for use in our church. It distills the 300 pages of the Book of Confessions to a helpful summary – six essentials and seven distinctives. As nominating committees consider candidates for church office, as elders examine newly-

  5. What exactly is Reformed theology?

    www.christtheredeemer-ls.org/blog/post/what-is...

    Oct 19, 2020 · Thirdly, to hold to Reformed theology one must affirm the Doctrines of Grace, which is commonly referred to as Calvinism. While the Solas define the battle lines, the tenets of Calvinism commonly summarized in the acronym TULIP truly lay out our understanding of who God is and how we relate to Him.

  6. What is Reformed Theology? - church

    christchurchreformed.com/What-is-Reformed
    • The Doctrine of Scripture.
    • The Sovereignty of God.
    • The Doctrines of Grace.
    • The Cultural Mandate.

    The reformed commitment to Scripture stresses the Bible’s inspiration, authority, and sufficiency. Since the Bible is the Word of God and so has the authority of God Himself, reformed people affirm that this authority is superior to that of all governments and all church hierarchies. This conviction has given reformed believers the courage to stand against tyranny and has made reformed theology a revolutionary force in society. The sufficiency of Scripture means that it does not need to be supplemented by new or ongoing special revelation. The Bible is the entirely sufficient guide for what we are to believe and how we are to live as Christians. The Reformers, and particularly John Calvin, stressed the way the objective, written Word and the inner, supernatural ministry of the Holy Spirit work together, the Holy Spirit illuminating the Word to God’s people. The Word without the illumination of the Holy Spirit remains a closed book. The supposed leading of the Spirit without the Word...

    For most reformed people the chief and most distinctive article of the creed is God’s sovereignty. Sovereignty means rule, and the sovereignty of God means that God rules over His creation with absolute power and authority. He determines what is going to happen, and it does happen. God is not alarmed, frustrated, or defeated by circumstances, by sin, or by the rebellion of His creatures.

    Reformed theology emphasizes the doctrines of grace, best known by the acronym TULIP, though this does not correspond to the best possible names for the five doctrines.

    Reformed theology also emphasizes the cultural mandate, or the obligation of Christians to live actively in society and work for the transformation of the world and its cultures. Reformed people have had various views in this area, depending on the extent to which they believe such a transformation possible. But on the whole they agree on two things. First we are called to be in the world and not to withdraw from it. This sets reformed believers apart from monasticism. Second, we are to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, and visit the prisoner. But the chief needs of people are still spiritual, and social work is no adequate substitute for evangelism. In fact, efforts to help people will only be truly effective as their hearts and minds are changed by the gospel. This sets reformed believers apart from, mere humanitarianism. It has been objected to reformed theology that anyone who believes along reformed lines will lose all motivation for evangelism. “If God is going to do the work...

  7. What is Reformed Theology? - Crown & Covenant Reformed ...

    crowncovenantchurch.org/what-is-reformed-theology.aspx

    Reformed theology takes its name from the Protestant Reformation that took place in the sixteenth century when the church was reformed to be more Biblical in its teaching and practice.

  8. Reformed Baptist Theology: Its Distinctives and ...

    williamroach.org/2018/01/29/reformed-baptist...

    Jan 29, 2018 · For anyone interested in understanding the distinctives of Reformed Baptist theology and the covenant Baptist heritage, they should read The Distinctives of Covenant Baptist Theology, revised edition, by Pascal Denault and Recovering a Covenantal Heritage: Essays in Baptist Covenant Theology, edited by Richard Barcellos.

  9. What It Means To Be Reformed | Tim Challies

    www.challies.com/.../what-it-means-to-be-reformed
    • To confess the consensus of the five first centuries of the church: Classic theism: One omnipotent, benevolent God, distinct from creation. Nicene and Chalcedonian Trinitarianism: one God in three eternally existent persons, equal in power and glory.
    • To confess the four solas: The authority of Scripture: sola scriptura (Scripture alone) the basis of salvation: Sola Gratia (Grace alone) the means of salvation: Sola Fide (Faith alone)
    • To confess the distinctives of the Reformed faith: In salvation: monergism not synergism. God alone saves. Such monergism implies T.U.L.I.P., the Five Points of Calvinism from the Synod of Dordt
    • Other Reformed Distinctives:Professor Curtis goes on to list other points of doctrine he believes are Reformed distinctives. They include : The Regulative Principle of Worship, Covenant theology (The Church is the New Israel – we most often see an expression of this theology in infant baptism, but it also impacts eschatology and many other doctrines) and Life is religion (Christians have neither jobs nor careers; they have vocations (callings)).
  10. Reformed: A Definition | Tim Challies

    www.challies.com/articles/reformed-a-definition
    • To confess the consensus of the five first centuries of the church: Classic theism: One omnipotent, benevolent God, distinct from creation. Nicene and Chalcedonian Trinitarianism: one God in three eternally existent persons, equal in power and glory.
    • To confess the four solas: The authority of Scripture: sola scriptura (Scripture alone) the basis of salvation: Sola Gratia (Grace alone) the means of salvation: Sola Fide (Faith alone)
    • To confess the distinctives of the Reformed faith: In salvation: monergism not synergism. God alone saves. Such monergism implies T.U.L.I.P., the Five Points of Calvinism from the Synod of Dordt
    • Other Reformed Distinctives: Professor Curtis goes on to list other points of doctrine he believes are Reformed distinctives. They include : The Regulative Principle of Worship (which I have written about here), Covenant theology (The Church is the New Israel – this generally means infants are baptized rather than believers) and Life is religion (Christians have neither jobs nor careers; they have vocations (callings)).