Yahoo Web Search

  1. People also ask

    Who is Friedrich Nietzsche?

    What did Friedrich Nietzsche do?

    Was Nietzsche a philosopher?

    What influenced Nietzsche?

  2. Friedrich Nietzsche | Biography, Books, & Facts | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Friedrich-Nietzsche

    Oct 11, 2020 · Why is Friedrich Nietzsche important? Friedrich Nietzsche was a German philosopher who became one of the most influential of all modern thinkers. His attempts to unmask the motives that underlie traditional Western religion , morality, and philosophy deeply affected generations of theologians, philosophers, psychologists, poets, novelists, and playwrights.

  3. How is Friedrich Nietzsche significant in the history of the ...

    www.enotes.com/homework-help/how-friedrich...

    Friedrich Nietzsche is important in the history of the world for two main reasons. First, because he was part of an intellectual movement towards modernism in the late 1800s. Second, because his...

    • Life and Works
    • Critique of Religion and Morality
    • Value Creation
    • The Self and Self-Fashioning
    • Difficulties of Nietzsche’s Philosophical Writing
    • Key Doctrines

    Nietzsche was born on October 15, 1844, in Röcken (near Leipzig),where his father was a Lutheran minister. His father died in 1849, andthe family relocated to Naumburg, where he grew up in a householdcomprising his mother, grandmother, two aunts, and his younger sister,Elisabeth. Nietzsche had a brilliant school and university career,culminating in May 1869 when he was called to a chair in classicalphilology at Basel. At age 24, he was the youngest ever appointed tothat post. His teacher Frie...

    Nietzsche is arguably most famous for his criticisms of traditionalEuropean moral commitments, together with their foundations inChristianity. This critique is very wide-ranging; it aims to underminenot just religious faith or philosophical moral theory, butalso many central aspects of ordinary moral consciousness, some ofwhich are difficult to imagine doing without (e.g., altruisticconcern, guilt for wrongdoing, moral responsibility, the value ofcompassion, the demand for equal consideration...

    Unfortunately, neither Nietzsche’s ideas about the nature ofvalue creation nor his suggestions about what specific values shouldbe “created” have seemed as clear to readers as hisnegative critique of traditional values. (The disparity is oftenmarked in the literature by doubts about whether Nietzsche has a“positive” ethics to offer.) There is something to thisreaction: Nietzsche’s critique has a clear target and isdeveloped at an extended scale, whereas his suggestions aboutalternative values...

    A probing investigation into the psyche was a leading preoccupationfor Nietzsche throughout his career, and this aspect of his thoughthas rightly been accorded central importance across a long stretch ofthe reception, all the way from Kaufmann (1950) to recent work byPippin (2010), Katsafanas (2016), and others. Some ofNietzsche’s own programmatic reflections highlight thecentrality of this enterprise: perhaps most famously, he closes anextended treatment of the shortcomings of previous philo...

    For all the novelty of Nietzsche’s doctrines and the apparentextremity of his criticisms of traditional morality, religion, andphilosophy, perhaps nothing about his work seems more out of step withthe ordinary procedures of philosophy than the way he writes. Thepoint is sufficiently obvious that it has by now become an entirelyconventional trope to begin commentaries with remarks about theunconventional character of Nietzsche’s style. Despitethe attention it gets, however, we continue to lack...

    This entry has focused on broad themes pursued throughoutNietzsche’s writing, but much—evenmost—philosophically sophisticated commentary on his work hasbeen devoted to the explication of certain core doctrinal commitments,which Nietzsche seems to rely upon throughout, but which he does notdevelop systematically in his published works in the way typical forphilosophers. Some of these doctrines, like the idea of the eternalrecurrence of the same, are described as “fundamental” byNietzsche himse...

  4. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (15 October 1844 – 25 August 1900) was a German philologist, philosopher, cultural critic, poet and composer. More on Nietzsche: ...

    • 168 min
    • 479.4K
    • The Film Archives
  5. Influence and reception of Friedrich Nietzsche - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Influence_and_reception_of...

    This, in a nutshell, is how Jung came to see Nietzsche, and explains why he was so fascinated by Nietzsche as a thinker." [43] Nietzsche had also an important influence on psychotherapist and founder of the school of individual psychology Alfred Adler .

    • Schulpforta
    • Bonn and Leipzig
    • Basel
    • Physiognomy and Teleology
    • Réealism and Genealogy
    • Reception
    • References and Further Reading

    Nietzsche enrolled at Schulpfortain 1858 at the age of fourteen. The four hundred year-old school was long the standard of humane education in Germany. During Nietzsche’s time there, the character of the school mirrored that of its most venerable literary scholar and historian Friedrich August Koberstein. Embracing those same two disciplines himself, Nietzsche’s first extensive historiographical project covered the saga of the fourth century Ostrogoth King Ermanarich (KGW I/2, 274-284). Even then Nietzsche tried his hand at various historiographic expressions. In 1861, he wrote a symphonic poem entitled Serbia (BAW 2, 32-37). The following year, he presented to his friends Wilhelm Pinder and Gustav Krug three additional “Hungarian Sketches” in imitation of Liszt, whose daughter Cosima was to become Cosima van Bulow and then Cosima Wagner. In the fall of that year, Nietzsche outlined the composition of a dramatic production entitled ‘Ermanarich’ (BAW 2, 144-54), and as late as the su...

    Friedrich August Wolf is typically considered the father of German philology. Wolf provided the study of antiquity, more than a generation before Ranke did for historiography generally, its first systematic set of methods and its first aspiration to achieve the same sort of demonstrable progress and rigor as the natural sciences. Wolf’s two most important descendants, Gottfried Hermann and August Boeckh, founded two groups of scholars with antipodal methodologies: the Sprachphilologen and the Sachphilologen respectively.For the former, the scientific status of philology entailed both certainty and objectivity, which in turn meant avoiding as much as possible the intrusion of subjective interpretations of evidence. To do that, the Sprachphilologen narrowed their net of acceptable evidence to that which allegedly needed no interpretation, to that form of evidence whose meaning would allegedly be manifest to whoever could observe it: the written word. The Sachphilologen, on the contrar...

    In 1869, Nietzsche presented the lecture “Homer und die klassische Philologie” (KGW II/1, 247-69), full of hope for the potential of a renewed and invigorated field. Toward the end of the lecture, however, he declares that that goal must be accomplished by recognizing a new philosophical basis, that “each and every philological activity should be enclosed by and proceed from a philosophical worldview” (KGW II/1, 268). The reference is clearly to Schopenhauer, whom he had begun to read already in the Fall of 1865. Nietzsche and most of his associates at the time sought to combine Schopenhauer’s teaching with historiography. His childhood friend Paul Deussen studied oriental history and culture with Swami Vivekananda—and would found the Schopenahuer-Gesellschaft in 1911. Richard Wagner, who fancied himself at times the reviver of the ‘true’ historical Germanic culture, sent a personal copy of his Nibelungen directly to Schopenhauer, and sometimes touted that his opera was the expressi...

    Shortly before the Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche wrote to Erwin Rohde that “Scholarship, art, and philosophy are growing together inside me to such an extent that one day I’m bound to give birth to centaurs” (Letter to Rohde, January 15th, 1870; KSB 3, 95). Indeed, the book was just that, though it was no longer something to be proud of. Almost immediately after, Nietzsche rescinded his artistic-mystical view about the historian’s ability to intuit the real Ideas, in Schopenhauer’s technical sense, of the nature of tragedy beyond the mediated observation of the past through historical evidence. “For the readers of my earlier writings I wish to expressly clarify that I have abandoned the metaphysical-artistic views that fundamentally govern them” (N Ende 1876-Sommer 1877 23, KSA 8, 463). His increasingly skeptical attitude toward the mystical aspect of Schopenhauer’s philosophy led Nietzsche to revise major aspects of his own thought. In 1874’s vom Nutzen und Nachteil der Historie für...

    Nietzsche’s rejection of nomothetic schemata that purport to explain historical change, whether metaphysical or naturalistic, does not imply he was a radical outlier of the ‘historical’ 19th-Century. Every bit as historically-concerned as the teleologists, he thinks “philosophy, or that alone which I count it to be, [is] the most general form of history, the attempt to somehow describe and abbreviate in signs the Heraclitean world of becoming…” (N 1885 36, KSA 11, 562). Nietzsche’s attempt at historicizing philosophy would endure longer than his friendship with the man who helped to inspire it. For alongside Paul Rée he came to the conviction that values, whether moral, political, aesthetic, or even metaphysical, were a function of drives which were themselves conditioned subconsciously throughout a long historical process. Old religious and Platonic beliefs in good and evil as static metaphysical entities were, for both Rée and Nietzsche, to be replaced with a naturalistic and deve...

    Nietzsche rejects attempts to construe a past in-itself without acknowledging the tangled but inextricable web of interpretations cast upon it by later interpreters. “[T]he origin of the emergence of a thing and its ultimate usefulness, its practical application and incorporation into a system of ends, are toto coeloseparate; anything in existence, having somehow come about, is continually interpreted anew, requisitioned anew, transformed and redirected to a new purpose” (GM II 12, KSA 5, 313). Any attempt to isolate Nietzsche’s historiographical ideas for the sake of contextualizing them would accordingly demand a reckoning of the many drives of its very many interpreters over the past century or so. Such a genealogical account of Nietzsche’s historiography would be severely unwieldy, if not impossible. It nevertheless serves to mention at least two of the most prominent lines of the interpretive reception of Nietzsche’s meta-history. Although a broad generalization, continental th...

    BAW: Historisch-kritische Gesamtausgabe: Werke, 5 vols., edited by Joachim Mette et al. (Berlin, 1933–43).
    KGB: Kritische Gesamtausgabe: Briefwechsel, edited by Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari (Berlin, 1975ff).
    KGW: Kritische Gesamtausgabe: Werke, edited by Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari (Berlin, 1967ff).
    KSA: Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, 15 vols., edited by Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari (Berlin, 1988).
  6. Why Was Friedrich Nietzsche Important? Quotes, Books ...

    www.reddit.com/r/philosophy/comments/3bc7yu/why...

    Nietzsche was a philosopher who knew the weaknesses of philosophy. He knew that philosophy could never develop a "system" the way the sciences could (see, e.g., "the will to a system is a lack of integrity").

    • Life
    • Periodization of Writings
    • Problems of Interpretation
    • Nihilism and The Revaluation of Values
    • The Human Exemplar
    • Will to Power
    • Eternal Recurrence
    • Reception of Nietzsche’s Thought
    • References and Further Reading

    Because much of Nietzsche’s philosophical work has to do with the creation of self—or to put it in Nietzschean terms, “becoming what one is”— some scholars exhibit uncommon interest in the biographical anecdotes of Nietzsche’s life. Taking this approach, however, risks confusing aspects of the Nietzsche legend with what is important in his philosophical work, and many commentators are rightly skeptical of readings derived primarily from biographical anecdotes.Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was b...

    Nietzsche scholars commonly divide his work into periods, usually with the implication that discernable shifts in Nietzsche’s circumstances and intellectual development justify some form of periodization in the corpus. The following division is typical:(i.) before 1869—the juveniliaCautious Nietzsche biographers work to separate the facts of Nietzsche’s life from myth, and while a major part of the Nietzsche legend holds that Friedrich was a precocious child, writings from his youth bear witn...

    Nietzsche’s work in the beginning was heavily influenced, either positively or negatively, by the events of his young life. His early and on-going interest in the Greeks, for example, can be attributed in part to his Classical education at Schulpforta, for which he was well-prepared as a result of his family’s attempts to steer him into the ministry. Nietzsche’s intense association with Wagner no doubt enhanced his orientation towards the philosophy of Schopenhauer, and it probably promoted h...

    Although Michael Gillespie makes a strong case that Nietzsche misunderstood nihilism, and in any event Nietzsche’s Dionysianism would be a better place to look for an anti-metaphysical breakthrough in Nietzsche’s corpus (1995, 178), commentators as varied in philosophical orientation as Heidegger and Danto have argued that nihilism is a central theme in Nietzsche’s philosophy. Why is this so? The constellation of Nietzsche’s fundamental concepts moves within his general understanding of moder...

    How and why do nihilism and the pessimism of weakness prevail in modernity? Again, from the notebook of 1887 (Will to Power, aphorism 27), we find two conditions for this situation:With the fulfillment of “European nihilism” (which is no doubt, for Nietzsche, endemic throughout the Western world and anyplace touched by “modernity”), and the death of otherworldly hopes for redemption, Nietzsche imagines two possible responses: the easy response, the way of the “herd” and “the last man,” or the...

    The exemplar expresses hope not granted from metaphysical illusions. After sharpening the critique of art and genius during the positivistic period, Nietzsche seems more cautious about heaping praise upon specific historical figures and types, but even when he could no longer find an ideal exception, he nevertheless deemed it requisite to fabricate one in myth. Whereas exceptional humans of the past belong to an exalted “republic of genius,” those of the future, those belonging to human desti...

    The world’s eternally self-creating, self-destroying play is conditioned by time. Yet, Nietzsche’s skepticism concerning what can be known of telos, indeed his refutation of an absolute telos independent of human fabrication, demands a view of time that differs from those that place willing, purposiveness, and efficient causes in the service of goals, sufficient reason, and causa prima. Another formulation of this problem might ask, “what is the history of willing, if not the demonstration of...

    The reception of Nietzsche’s work, on all levels of engagement, has been complicated by historical contingencies that are related only by accident to the thought itself. The first of these complications pertains to the editorial control gained by Elizabeth in the aftermath of her brother’s mental and physical collapse. Elisabeth’s overall impact on her brother’s reputation is generally thought to be very problematic. Her husband, Bernhard Förster, whom Friedrich detested, was a leader of the...

    1. Samtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, ed. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, 15 vols (Berlin: de Gruyter, 1980). 1. This “critical student edition” of collected works, commonly referenced as the KSA, contains Nietzsche’s major writings and most of the well-known essays and aphorisms found in his journals. Specialists and readers seeking Nietzsche’s letters, his lectures at Basel, and other writings from his vast Nachlass, will need to supplement the KSA with two additional sources....

  7. Why should I read Friedrich Nietzsche? - Quora

    www.quora.com/Why-should-I-read-Friedrich-Nietzsche

    (1) Short answer: Because Nietzsche is a gleefully defiant irreverent rebel, a dick, who tells you, not whether your beliefs are true or false, but challenges you on whether your belief about your beliefs are soundly premised. He upends your universe, so that you can reharmonize it over, on your terms. Why should you hold the beliefs that you do?

  8. People also search for