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  1. Middle English - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Middle_English_language

    A significant number of words of French origin began to appear in the English language alongside native English words of similar meaning, giving rise to such Modern English synonyms as pig/pork, chicken/poultry, calf/veal, cow/beef, sheep/mutton, wood/forest, house/mansion, worthy/valuable, bold/courageous, freedom/liberty, sight/vision, eat/dine.

  2. Wiktionary:Etymology scriptorium/2016/June - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › Wiktionary:Etymology

    We reconstruct a Proto-Germanic form, but the German and Dutch standard sources agree that their respective words are of Romance origin (). The word is first attested in German in 1361 and in Dutch in 1477, that is significantly younger than the Old French (1270).

  3. Wikipedia:Featured article candidates/Featured log/August ...

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Wikipedia:Featured_article

    "was paraphyletic, meaning that the subfamily did not group all the descendants of a common ancestor." makes the following explanation redundant if you just use the term paraphyletic again: "A 2011 DNA study concluded that not all of these subfamilies were clades, or consisted of all the descendants of a common ancestor".

  4. Middle English : definition of Middle English and synonyms of ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com › Middle English › en-en

    Consider these pairs of Modern English words. The first of each pair is derived from Old English and the second is of Anglo-Norman origin: pig/pork, chicken/poultry, calf/veal, cow/beef, wood/forest, sheep/mutton, house/mansion, worthy/honourable, bold/courageous, freedom/liberty. [2]

  5. Wiktionary:Etymology scriptorium/2013/February - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › Wiktionary:Etymology

    To me, the etymology section seems OK. The pure phonetic transcription is 查克拉 (chákèlā) as in the Chinese Wikipedia article, 脈輪 / 脉轮 (màilún) and 氣卦 / 气卦 (qìguà) are listed there as synonyms. --Anatoli (обсудить / вклад) 23:48, 18 February 2013 (UTC) @Eirikr, I'll share my little "secret".

  6. Helen of Troy : definition of Helen of Troy and synonyms of ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com › Helen of Troy › en-en

    Artists of the 1460s and 1470s were influenced by Guido delle Colonne's Historia destructionis Troiae, where Helen's abduction was portrayed as a scene of seduction. In the Florentine Picture Chronicle Paris and Helen are shown departing arm in arm, while their marriage was depicted into Franco-Flemish tapestry.

  7. Wiktionary:Tea room/2017/November - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › Wiktionary:Tea_room

    As Cartagena is being traduced, most people go for the name "New Carthago", as eg. New York, New Jersey, etc., meaning a copy of a city in the colonisator's country. The history of Cartagena - Spain might be quite similar as being the "New" edition of an existing name in the country of origin.

  8. Nogai_Horde : definition of Nogai_Horde and synonyms of Nogai ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com › Nogai_Horde › en-en

    Nogai Horde, Nogai Yortu was a confederation of about eighteen Turkic and Mongol tribes that occupied the Pontic-Caspian steppe from about 1500 until they were pushed west by the Kalmyks and south by the Russians in the 17th century. The Mongol tribe called the Manghits constituted a core of the Nogai Horde.

  9. Carrack : definition of Carrack and synonyms of Carrack (English)

    dictionary.sensagent.com › Carrack › en-en
    • Origins
    • Carracks in Asia
    • Famous Carracks
    • See Also
    • References
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    By the Late Middle Ages the cog, and cog-like square-rigged vessels, were widely used along the coasts of Europe, in the Baltic, and also in the Mediterranean. Given the conditions of the Mediterrenean, but not exclusively restricted to it, galley type vessels were extensively used there, as were various two masted vessels, including the caravels with their lateen sails. These and similar ship types were familiar to Portuguese navigators and shipwrights. As the Portuguese gradually extended their explorations and trade ever further south along Africa's Atlantic coast during the 15th century they needed a larger and more advanced ship for their long oceanic adventures. Gradually, they developed the carrack[2]from a fusion and modification of aspects of the ship types they knew operating in both the Atlantic and Mediterranean and a new, more advanced form of sail rigging that allowed much improved sailing characteristics in the heavy winds and waves of the Atlantic ocean. A typical th...

    From around 1515, Portugal had trade exchanges with Goa in India, consisting of 3 to 4 carracks leaving Lisbon with silver to purchase cotton and spices in India. Out of these, only one carrack went on to Ming Chinain order to purchase silk, also in exchange for Portuguese silver. From the time of the acquisition of Macau in 1557, and their formal recognition as trade partners by the Chinese, the Portuguese Crown started to regulate trade to Japan, by selling to the highest bidder the annual "Captaincy" to Japan, in effect conferring exclusive trading rights for a single carrack bound for Japan every year. That trade continued with few interruptions until 1638, when it was prohibited on the grounds that the ships were smuggling priests into Japan. In the middle of the 16th century the first galleonswere developed from the carrack. The galleon design came to replace that of the carrack although carracks were still in use as late as the early 17th century.

    Santa María, in which Christopher Columbusmade his first voyage to America in 1492.
    São Gabriel, commanded by Vasco da Gamain the 1497 Portuguese expedition from Europe to India by circumnavigating Africa.
    Frol de la mar, served over nine years in the Indian Ocean, sinking in 1512 with Afonso de Albuquerque after the conquest of Malaccawith a huge booty, making it one of the mythical lost treasures.
    ^ Konstam, A. (2002). The History of Shipwrecks. New York: Lyons Press. pp. 77–79. ISBN 1-58574-620-7.
    ^ The origin of the word carrack is usually traced back through the medieval European languages to the Arabic, and from thence to the Greek κέρκουρος (kerkouros) meaning approximately "lighter (bar...
    Kirsch, Peter (1990). The Galleon. Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-546-2.
    Nair, V. Sankaran (2008). Kerala Coast: A Byway in History. (Carrack: Word Lore). Trivandrum: Folio. ISBN 978-81-906028-1-5.
    The Development of the Square-Rigged Ship: from the carrack to the full-rigger
  10. Middle English

    hyperleap.com › topic › Middle_English

    A significant number of words of French origin began to appear in the English language alongside native English words of similar meaning, giving rise to such Modern English synonyms as pig/pork, chicken/poultry, calf/veal, cow/beef, sheep/mutton, wood/forest, house/mansion, worthy/valuable, bold/courageous, freedom/liberty, sight/vision, eat/dine.

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