Yahoo Web Search

  1. 2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › 2014_pro-Russian_unrest_in

    A rally in support of pro-Russian unrest in the eastern Ukraine, Moscow, 11 June 2014 Igor Girkin (Russian security officer, leaders of the armed group of Russian soldiers seizing Slavyansk) [415] Pavel Gubarev (self-proclaimed 'People's Governor' of Donetsk) [416]

  2. Timeline of the 2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Timeline_of_the_2014_pro

    Pro-Russian protesters remove a Ukrainian flag and replace it with a Russian flag in front of the Donetsk Oblast Regional State Administration building, 1 March 2014. This is a timeline of the 2014 pro-Russian unrest that has erupted in Ukraine, in the aftermath of the Ukrainian revolution and the Euromaidan movement.

  3. People also ask

    When did the pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine start?

    When did the Euromaidan protests start in Ukraine?

    Who was the Prime Minister of Ukraine in 2014?

    What did Ukraine do to Russia in 2014?

  4. Category:2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Category:2014_pro-Russian

    Pages in category "2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine" The following 25 pages are in this category, out of 25 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ().

  5. List of people sanctioned during the Ukrainian crisis - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_individuals

    The 2014 Crimean crisis, part of the unrest, and the ensuing Russian military intervention there led some governments in Europe, North America and elsewhere to target Russian and pro-Russian Ukrainian politicians, officers and businessmen. As the unrest expanded into parts of eastern and southern Ukraine, the scope

  6. Ukrainian crisis - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › 2013–15_Ukrainian_Crisis

    The Ukrainian Crisis is the collective name for the 2013–14 Euromaidan protests associated with emergent social movement of integration of Ukraine into the European Union, the subsequent February 2014 Revolution of Dignity and the ensuing pro-Russian unrest. Map of the 2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine.

  7. 2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine - Wikiwand

    www.wikiwand.com › en › 2014_pro-Russian_unrest_in

    From the end of February 2014, demonstrations by pro-Russian and anti-government groups took place in major cities across the eastern and southern regions of Ukraine, in the aftermath of the Euromaidan movement and the 2014 Ukrainian revolution. During the first stage of the unrest, known as the "Russian Spring" ,[49][50] the Ukrainian territory of Crimea was annexed by the Russian Federation ...

  8. Russia–Ukraine relations - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Russo-Ukrainian_relations

    Throughout March and April 2014, pro-Russian unrest spread in Ukraine, with pro-Russian groups proclaiming "People's Republics" in the oblasts of Donetsk and Luhansk, as of 2017 both partially outside the control of the Ukrainian government.

  9. Category:2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine - Wikimedia Commons

    commons.wikimedia.org › wiki › Category:2014_pro

    Subcategories. This category has the following 10 subcategories, out of 10 total. 2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine by city ‎ (2 C) 2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine by month ‎ (6 C) Maps of the 2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine ‎ (2 C, 21 F)

    • 23 February 2014
    • Eastern Ukraine, Crimean Peninsula, Southern Ukraine
  10. 2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine - WikiZero - Free Encyclopedia

    www.wikizero.com › en › 2014_pro-Russian_unrest_in

    Aug 11, 2018 · A rally in support of pro-Russian unrest in the eastern Ukraine, Moscow, 11 June 2014 Igor Girkin (Russian security officer, leaders of the armed group of Russian soldiers seizing Slavyansk) [413] Pavel Gubarev (self-proclaimed 'People's Governor' of Donetsk) [414]

  11. People also search for