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  1. The period of the 5th century BC in classical Greece is generally considered as beginning in 500 and ending in 404, though this is debated. This century is essentially studied from the Athenian viewpoint, since Athens has left more narratives, plays and other written works than the other Greek states.

    Greece in the 5th century BC - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greece_in_5th_century_BC
  2. Greece in the 5th century BC - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greece_in_5th_century_BC

    The period of the 5th century BC in classical Greece is generally considered as beginning in 500 and ending in 404, though this is debated. This century is essentially studied from the Athenian viewpoint, since Athens has left more narratives, plays and other written works than the other Greek states.

  3. Greek civilization in the 5th century - Britannica

    www.britannica.com/place/ancient-Greece/Greek...

    Hippocrates was a 5th-century native of the Dorian island of Cos, but the writings that have survived are probably not his personal work. Many of them contain references to northern Greek places such as Thasos and Abdera, a reminder that intellectual activity went on outside Athens. Philippe, Pieter: Portrait of Hippocrates

  4. Greece in the Fifth Century - An Athenian Perspective

    www.thegreatcoursesdaily.com/greece-in-the-fifth...

    Sep 04, 2020 · As a result, Greece in the fifth century was marked by the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, which had momentous consequences for Greece. As for Athens, there were often several theaters of war, in which the Athenians participated with enthusiasm and vigor. The Athenian Way of Life Historians considered most Greeks as either rich or poor.

  5. Classical Greece - HISTORY

    www.history.com/.../ancient-history/classical-greece
    • Persian Wars. Led by Athens and Sparta, the Greek city-states were engaged in a great war with the Persian Empire at the beginning of the fifth century B.C.
    • The Rise of Athens. The defeat of the Persians marked the beginning of Athenian political, economic and cultural dominance. In 507 B.C., the Athenian nobleman Cleisthenes had overthrown the last of the autocratic tyrants and devised a new system of citizen self-governance that he called demokratia.
    • Athens Under Pericles. In the 450s, the Athenian general Pericles consolidated his own power by using all that tribute money to serve the citizens of Athens, rich and poor.
    • Art and Architecture. Pericles also used the tribute money to support Athenian artists and thinkers. For instance, he paid to rebuild the parts of Athens that the Persian Wars had destroyed.
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  7. Greece in 5th century BC | Article about Greece in 5th ...

    encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Greece+in...

    Looking for Greece in 5th century BC? Find out information about Greece in 5th century BC. The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia . It might be outdated or ideologically biased. , the name given to the territory of the ancient... Explanation of Greece in 5th century BC

  8. That is a surprisingly abstract way of looking at the subdivisions of the Greeks, because it would have been more natural for a 5th-century Greek to identify soldiers by home cities.

    • Is ancient Greece a country?
      No, ancient Greece was a civilization. The Greeks had cultural traits, a religion, and a language in common, though they spoke many dialects. The b...
    • Where was ancient Greece located?
      Ancient Greek civilization was concentrated in what is today Greece and along the western coast of Turkey. However, ancient Greek colonists establi...
    • Was ancient Greece a democracy?
      Each ancient Greek city-state had its own government. Common forms of government included tyranny and oligarchy. In 507 BCE, under the leadership o...
    • When did ancient Greece start and end?
      Ancient Greek civilization flourished from the period following Mycenaean civilization, which ended about 1200 BCE, to the death of Alexander the G...
    • Why is ancient Greece important?
      The political, philosophical, artistic, and scientific achievements of ancient Greek civilization formed a legacy with unparalleled influence on We...
  9. Death, Burial, and the Afterlife in Ancient Greece | Essay ...

    www.metmuseum.org/TOAH/hd/dbag/hd_dbag.htm

    The ancient Greek conception of the afterlife and the ceremonies associated with burial were already well established by the sixth century B.C. In the Odyssey , Homer describes the Underworld, deep beneath the earth, where Hades, the brother of Zeus and Poseidon , and his wife, Persephone, reigned over countless drifting crowds of shadowy ...

    • from Local to International Trade
    • Traded Goods
    • Trade Incentives & Protection

    In Greece and the wider Aegean, local, regional, and international trade exchange existed from Minoan and Mycenaean times in the Bronze Age. The presence, in particular, of pottery and precious goods such as gold, copper, and ivory, found far from their place of production, attests to the exchange network which existed between Egypt, Asia Minor, the Greek mainland, and islands such as Crete, Cyprus, and the Cyclades. Trade lessened and perhaps almost disappeared when these civilizations declined, and during the so-called Dark Ages from the 11th to 8th centuries BCE international trade in the Mediterranean was principally carried out by the Phoenicians. The earliest written sources of Homer and Hesiod attest to the existence of trade (emporia) and merchants (emporoi) from the 8th century BCE, although they often present the activity as unsuitable for the ruling and landed aristocracy. Nevertheless, international trade grew from 750 BCE, and contacts spread across the Mediterranean dr...

    Goods which were traded within Greece between different city-states included: 1. cereals 2. wine 3. olives 4. figs 5. pulses 6. eels 7. cheese 8. honey 9. meat (especially from sheep and goats) 10. tools (e.g.: knives) 11. perfumes 12. fine pottery, especially Attic and Corinthian wares. Fine Greek pottery was also in great demand abroad and examples have been found as far afield as the Atlantic coast of Africa. Other Greek exports included wine, especially from Aegean islands like Mende and Kos, bronze work, olives and olive oil (transported, like wine, in amphorae), emery from Delos, hides from Euboea, marble from Athens and Naxos, and ruddle (a type of waterproofing material for ships) from Keos. The goods available at the market places (agorai) of major urban centres which were imported from outside Greece included: 1. wheat 2. slaves from Egypt 3. grain from the Black Sea (especially via Byzantium) 4. salt fish from the Black Sea 5. wood (especially for shipbuilding) from Maced...

    Maritime loans enabled traders to pay for their cargoes and the loan did not have to be repaid if the ship failed to reach safely its port of destination. To compensate the lender for this risk, interest rates (nautikos tokos) could be from 12.5 to 30% and the ship was often the security on the loan. The involvement of the state in trade was relatively limited; however, a notable exception was grain. For example, so vital was it to feed Athens’ large population and especially valuable in times of drought, trade in wheat was controlled and purchased by a special ‘grain buyer’ (sitones). From c. 470 BCE the obstruction of the import of grain was prohibited, as was the re-exportation of it; for offenders the punishment was the death penalty. Market officials (agoranomoi) ensured the quality of goods on sale in the markets and grain had its own supervisors, the sitophylakes, who regulated that prices and quantities were correct. Besides taxes on the movement of goods (e.g.: road taxes o...

    • The Origins of Tragedy
    • A Tragedy Play
    • Competition & Celebrated Playwrights
    • Comedy - Origins
    • A Comedy Play
    • Legacy

    The exact origins of tragedy (tragōida) are debated amongst scholars. Some have linked the rise of the genre to an earlier art form, the lyrical performance of epic poetry. Others suggest a strong link with the rituals performed in the worship of Dionysos such as the sacrifice of goats - a song ritual called trag-ōdia - and the wearing of masks. Indeed, Dionysos became known as the god of theatre and perhaps there is another connection - the drinking rites which resulted in the worshippers lo...

    Plays were performed in an open-air theatre (theatron) with wonderful acoustics and seemingly open to all of the male populace (the presence of women is contested). From the mid-5th century BCE entrance was free. The plot of a tragedy was almost always inspired by episodes from Greek mythology, which we must remember were often a part of Greek religion. As a consequence of this serious subject matter, which often dealt with moral right and wrongs and tragic no-win dilemmas, violence was not p...

    The most famous competition for the performance of tragedy was as part of the spring festival of Dionysos Eleuthereus or the City Dionysia in Athens. The archon, a high-ranking official of the city, decided which plays would be performed in competition and which citizens would act as chorēgoi and have the honour of funding their production while the state paid the poet and lead actors. Each selected poet would submit three tragedies and one satyr play, a type of short parody performance on a...

    The precise origins of Greek comedy plays are lost in the mists of prehistory, but the activity of men dressing as and mimicking others must surely go back a long way before written records. The first indications of such activity in the Greek world come from pottery, where decoration in the 6th century BCE frequently represented actors dressed as horses, satyrs, and dancers in exaggerated costumes. Another early source of comedy is the poems of Archilochus (7th century BCE) and Hipponax (6th...

    Although innovations occurred, a comedy play followed a conventional structure. The first part was the parados where the Chorus of as many as 24 performers entered and performed a number of song and dance routines. Dressed to impress, their outlandish costumes could represent anything from giant bees with huge stingers to knights riding another man in imitation of a horse or even a variety of kitchen utensils. In many cases the play was actually named after the Chorus, e.g., Aristophanes' The...

    New plays were continuously being written and performed, and with the formation of actors’ guilds in the 3rd century BCE and the mobility of professional troupes, Greek theatre continued to spread across the Mediterranean with theatres becoming a common feature of the urban landscape from Magna Graecia to Asia Minor. In the Roman world plays were translated and imitated in Latin, and the genre gave rise to a new art form from the 1st century BCE, pantomime, which drew inspiration from the pre...

  10. Greece: Ancient and Classical - EuroDocs

    eudocs.lib.byu.edu/.../Greece:_Ancient_and_Classical

    Jun 26, 2020 · (5th century BC - 5th century AD; English transcription) Pericles in Ancient Sources; Ancient accounts of the famed Athenian general. Compiled by Attalus (5th century BC; English translations) Ancient Greece; An overview of Greek life in ancient Athens and Sparta. An online project of the British Museum.

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