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  1. Mutual intelligibility - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Mutual_intelligibility

    5 days ago · Northern Germanic languages spoken in Scandinavia form a dialect continuum where two furthermost dialects have almost no mutual intelligibility. As such, spoken Danish and Swedish normally have low mutual intelligibility, but Swedes in the Öresund region (including Malmö and Helsingborg), across a strait from the Danish capital Copenhagen, understand Danish somewhat better, largely due to ...

  2. Regional accents of English - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Regional_accents_of_English

    5 days ago · Spoken English shows great variation across regions where it is the predominant language. This article provides an overview of the numerous identifiable variations in pronunciation; such distinctions usually derive from the phonetic inventory of local dialects, as well as from broader differences in the Standard English of different primary-speaking populations.

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  4. History of English - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › History_of_English

    Feb 26, 2021 · Middle English is the form of English spoken roughly from the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066 until the end of the 15th century.. For centuries after the Conquest, the Norman kings and high-ranking nobles in England and to some extent elsewhere in the British Isles spoke Anglo-Norman, a variety of Old Norman, originating from a northern langue d'oïl dialect.

  5. English dialects in the North of England: Morphology and ...

    www.researchgate.net › publication › 333032315

    Feb 26, 2021 · A CxG-based account of DMs in dialects of English naturally overcomes the problems mentioned above, since one of the main tenets of Cognitive Linguistics and CxG is to do away with deep structure ...

  6. Unintelligible definition and meaning | Collins English ...

    www.collinsdictionary.com › english › unintelligible

    5 days ago · Unintelligible language is impossible to understand, for example because it is not written or pronounced clearly, or because its meaning is confused or complicated. He muttered something unintelligible. American English: unintelligible / ʌnɪnˈtɛlɪdʒɪbəl /

  7. Writing - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Handwriting

    Feb 26, 2021 · China has eight regional languages that are mutually unintelligible, and many true dialects. The system appears to work mainly because as many as 70% speak Mandarin . Fluency in Chinese reading and writing is undoubtedly difficult to achieve, and this must act as a brake on the drive for literacy .

  8. Varieties of Arabic - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Aamiya

    The varieties (or dialects or vernacular languages) of Arabic, a Semitic language within the Afroasiatic family originating in the Arabian Peninsula, are the linguistic systems that Arabic speakers speak natively. There are considerable variations from region to region, with degrees of mutual intelligibility (and some are mutually ...

  9. German dialects - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › German_dialects

    6 days ago · German dialects are the various traditional local varieties of the German language. Though varied by region, those of the southern half of Germany beneath the Benrath line are dominated by the geographical spread of the High German consonant shift, and the dialect continua that connect German to the neighboring varieties of Low Franconian and Frisian.

  10. blind - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › blind
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    Alternative forms

    1. (archaic) blinde

    Etymology

    From Old English blind, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /blaɪnd/ 2. Rhymes: -aɪnd

    Etymology

    From Dutch blind, from Middle Dutch blint, from Old Dutch *blint, from Lua error in Module:etymology at line 156: Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) is not set as an ancestor of Afrikaans (af) in Module:languages/data2. The ancestor of Afrikaans is Dutch (nl)..

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /blənt/

    Adjective

    blind (attributive blinde, comparative blinder, superlative blindste) 1. blind(unable to see)

    Etymology

    From Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

    Pronunciation

    1. Rhymes: -end

    Adjective

    blind 1. blind

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /blɪnt/ 2. Hyphenation: blind 3. Rhymes: -ɪnt

    Etymology 1

    From Middle Dutch blint, from Old Dutch *blint, from Lua error in Module:etymology at line 156: Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) is not set as an ancestor of Dutch (nl) in Module:languages/data2. The ancestor of Dutch is Middle Dutch (dum)..

    Etymology 2

    From blinden.

    Etymology

    From Old High German blint, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /blɪnt/

    Adjective

    blind (comparative blinder, superlative am blindesten) 1. blind 2. (of a mirror or windowpane) cloudy 2.1. 1918, Elisabeth von Heyking, Die Orgelpfeifen, in: Zwei Erzählungen, Phillipp Reclam jun. Verlag, page 9: 2.1.1. So dunkel und schauerlich die Gruft aussah, wenn man durch die blinden, bestaubten Scheibchen der kleinen Fenster hineinblickte, so hell und freundlich war oben die Kirche. 2.1.1.1. Just as dark and eerie the crypt looked like, if one looked in it through the cloudy, dusted li...

    Etymology

    Cognate to Dutch blind, German blind.

    Adjective

    blind (comparative blinner, superlative blinnst) 1. blind

    Adjective

    blind 1. inflection of blindur: 1.1. feminine singular nominative strong positive degree 1.2. neuter plural nominative strong positive degree 1.3. neuter plural accusative strong positive degree

    Etymology

    From Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz. Akin to English blind.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /blɪnː/, /blɪnd/

    Adjective

    blind (masculine and feminine blind, neuter blindt, definite singular and plural blinde, comparative blindare, indefinite superlative blindast, definite superlative blindaste) 1. blind

    Etymology

    From Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /blind/

    Adjective

    blind 1. blind 1.1. blind, dēaf, and dumb 1.1.1. blind, deaf, and dumb 1.2. God is dēad and man is blind. 1.2.1. God is dead and man is blind. 2. (substantive)a blind person

    Etymology

    From Old Swedish blinder, from Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

    Adjective

    blind 1. blind; unable or failing to see

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