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  1. Avery Brundage ( / ˈeɪvri ˈbrʌndɪdʒ /; September 28, 1887 – May 8, 1975) was the fifth President of the International Olympic Committee, from 1952 to 1972. The only American to attain that position, Brundage is remembered as a zealous advocate of amateurism and for his involvement with the 1936 and 1972 Summer Olympics, both held in Germany.

  2. Avery Brundage was born on 28 September 1887 in Detroit, Michigan, but his family moved to Chicago when he was young. He attended the University of Illinois, graduating with a civil engineering degree in 1909. While in college he competed on the track & field team, winning the conference discus championship in his senior year.

  3. avery brundage, (born september 28, 1887, detroit, michigan, u.s.—died may 8, 1975, garmisch-partenkirchen, west germany), american sports administrator who was the controversial and domineering president of the international olympic committee (ioc) from 1952 to 1972 and did more to set the tone of the modern olympic games than any other …

  4. Jun 27, 2018 · BRUNDAGE, Avery (b. 28 September 1887 in Detroit, Michigan; d. 8 May 1975 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, West Germany), president of the International Olympic Committee from 1952 to 1972 who brought the Soviet Union into the Olympics, tried to unify the East and West German teams, and generally personified the games, which he ceremonially opened and closed for many years.

    • Overview
    • Early life; athletic career
    • IOC president (1952–1972)

    Avery Brundage (September 28, 1887 – May 8, 1975) was the fifth president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), serving from 1952 to 1972. The only American to attain that position, Brundage is remembered as a zealous advocate of amateurism, and for his involvement with the 1936 and 1972 Summer Olympics, both held in Germany. Brundage was b...

    Avery Brundage was born in Detroit, Michigan, on September 28, 1887, the son of Charles and Minnie (Lloyd) Brundage. Charles Brundage was a stonecutter; the Brundages moved to Chicago when Avery was five, and Charles Brundage soon thereafter abandoned his family. Avery and his younger brother, Chester, were mostly raised by aunts and uncles. At age...

    Amateurism This ideal was best realized, Brundage believed, in amateur sports: the athlete, he stated, should compete "for the love of the game itself without thought of reward or payment of any kind", with professionals being part of the entertainment business. Amateurism, to Brundage, expressed the concept of the Renaissance man, with abilities i...

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