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  1. List of rulers of Bosnia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ban_of_Bosnia

    Ban Paul: Šubić: 1305–1312: In 1305, Paul I Šubić. took the title Lord of Bosnia (Bosniae dominus). Ban Mladen II: Šubić: 1312–1322: Paul's eldest son Mladen II Šubić of Bribir. was Lord of Bosnia from 1312–1322. In 1314, Mladen II appoints Stephen II Kotromanić, his former enemy, as vassal in Bosnia.

  2. Stephen I, Ban of Bosnia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_I,_Ban_of_Bosnia

    Since 1287, when his father, Ban Prijezda I withdrew from power, Kotroman ruled jointly as Ban of Bosnia with another son of Prijezda I, Prijezda II. Kotroman separated the country with Prijezda II, and took eastern Bosnia. After the death of Prijezda II, Kotroman became the sole Ban of Bosnia in 1290. Marriage

  3. Stephen II, Ban of Bosnia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_II,_Ban_of_Bosnia
    • Overview
    • Early life
    • Reign
    • Edicts

    Stephen II was the Bosnian Ban from 1314, but in reality from 1322 to 1353 together with his brother, Vladislav Kotromanić in 1326–1353. He was the son of Bosnian Ban Stephen I Kotromanić and Elizabeth, sister of King Stefan Vladislav II. Throughout his reign in the fourteenth century, Stephen ruled the lands from Sava to the Adriatic and from Cetina to Drina. He was a member of the Kotromanić dynasty. He was buried in his Franciscan church in Mile, near Visoko, Bosnia.

    A member of the Kotromanić, there are sources that state that Stephen II was a "patarene". When his father died in 1314 and Croatian Ban Mladen II Šubić emerged as Count of Zadar, Princeps of Dalmatia and Second Bosnian Ban, Stephen's mother Elizabeth took him and his siblings and fled with them into exile to the Republic of Dubrovnik. Mladen was not popular in Bosnia and had fought bloody but losing wars against the Serbian Kingdom, and the Venetians, along with numerous internal ...

    Ban of Croatia, Mladen II, member of the Šubić noble family, became Ban of Bosnia in 1305, following his uncle, who was appointed Ban of Bosnia by his brother Paul I and was killed in fighting "Bosnian heretics" in 1304. Paul I referred to himself as Lord of all of Bosnia ...

    Immediately after the death of Serbian King Stefan Uroš II Milutin in 1321, he had no problem in acquiring his lands of Usora and Soli, which he fully incorporated in 1324. He helped his uncle Vladislav of Syrmia to regain all Serbia, but after the fall of Ostrvica at ...

    The Hungarian king Charles I Robert had asked Stephen II again, around 1323, to join the new Ban of Slavonia Nikola Omodijev and launch a joint offensive against Nelipić in Croatia. Nikola's expedition eventually failed, but it did rise up Juraj II Šubić against Nelipić ...

    Stephen withdrew all demands as can be seen in his edict to the Republic from 1332 in which he guaranteed future friendships between the Banate of Bosnia and the Republic of Ragusa. In the edict he called his people Bosnians.

  4. Banate of Bosnia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banate_of_Bosnia
    • Overview
    • Historical background
    • History
    • Economy
    • Religion

    The Banate of Bosnia, or Bosnian Banate, was a medieval state based in what is today Bosnia and Herzegovina. Although Hungarian kings viewed Bosnia as part of Hungarian Crown Lands, the Banate of Bosnia was a de facto independent state, for most of its existence. It was founded in the mid-12th century and existed until 1377 with interruptions under Šubić family between 1299 and 1324. In 1377 it was elevated to kingdom. The greater part of its history was marked by a religiopolitical...

    In 1136, Béla II of Hungary invaded upper Bosnia for the first time and created the title "Ban of Bosnia", initially only as an honorary title for his grown son Ladislaus II of Hungary. During the 12th century, rulers within the Banate of Bosnia acted increasingly autonomously from Hungary and/or Byzantium. In reality, outside powers had little control of the mountainous and somewhat peripheral regions which made up Bosnian Banate.

    Ban Borić appears as the first known Bosnian ruler in 1154, as an Hungarian vassal, who participated in the Siege of Braničevo as part of the Hungarian King forces In 1167 He was involved in offensives against the Byzantines when he provided troops for Hungarian armies War ...

    In 1203, Serbian Grand Prince Vukan Nemanjić accused Kulin of heresy and lodged an official appeal to the pope. At Bilino Polje Kulin signed abjuration stating that he was always a faithful Catholic, and saved Banate of Bosnia from outside intervention. In 1203, Kulin moved ...

    The Bosnian Crusade led by bishop John and Coloman lasted for five full years. The war only funnelled more support to Ninoslav, as only Sibislav took the Pope's side in the Crusade. Ninoslav issued an edict to the Republic of Ragusa on 22 May 1240, stating that he placed it under

    The second Bosnian ruler, Ban Kulin strengthened the country's economy through treaties with Dubrovnik in 1189 and Venice. Charter of Ban Kulin was a trade agreement between Bosnia and the Republic of Ragusa that effectively regulated Ragusan trade rights in Bosnia written on 29 August 1189. It is one of the oldest written state documents in the Balkans and is among the oldest historical documents written in Bosančica. The export of metal ores and metalwork formed the backbone of the ...

    Christian missions emanating from Rome and Constantinople started pushing into the Balkans in the 9th century, Christianizing the South Slavs and establishing boundaries between the ecclesiastical jurisdictions of the See of Rome and the See of Constantinople. The East–West Schism then led to the establishment of Roman Catholicism in Croatia and most of Dalmatia, while Eastern Orthodoxy came to prevail in Serbia. Lying in-between, the mountainous Bosnia was nominally under Rome, but ...

  5. prijezda i ban of bosnia : definition of prijezda i ban of ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/prijezda i ban of bosnia/en-en

    Ban. After the death of Matej Ninoslav in 1250, the question of power over Bosnia was initiated. Ninoslav's sons fought valiantly to keep Bosnia independent, but eventually King Béla IV of Hungary martially subjected Bosnia and implaced Prijezda as its Ban, who vouched that he would rule in Hungary's name.

  6. stephen i ban of bosnia : definition of stephen i ban of ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/stephen i ban of bosnia/en-en

    Before Ban. Since 1287, when his father, Ban Prijezda I withdraw from power, Kotroman ruled jointly as Ban of Bosnia with another son of Prijezda I, Prijezda II. Kotroman separated the country with Prijezda II, and took eastern Bosnia. After the death of Prijezda II, Kotroman became the sole Ban of Bosnia in 1290. Marriage

  7. prijezda ii ban of bosnia : definition of prijezda ii ban of ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/prijezda ii ban of bosnia/en-en

    Prijezda II was a Bosnian Ban in 1287–1290 alone, but later together with his brother Stephen I Kotroman as a vassal of the Hungarian Kingdom. He was one of the sons of Ban Prijezda I. After his father's withdrawal from power in 1287, he split Bosnia with his brother taking control over western Bosnia.

  8. Bosnia and Herzegovina Travel regulations, Coronavirus ...

    travelbans.org/europe/bosnia-and-herzegovina

    Bosnia and Herzegovina All airports in the country remain closed. Sarajevo International Airport is scheduled to open on15 June, but it is uncertain which airlines will resume flights and when their first flights will be scheduled (OASC, 09.06.2020). ***** International restrictions:

  9. Movement Ban Worsens Migrants’ Plight in Serbia, Bosnia ...

    balkaninsight.com/2020/04/09/movement-ban...

    Apr 09, 2020 · Local and international organisations that assist migrants and refugees are no longer able to enter reception centres in Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina due to the complete ban on movement in ...

  10. Bosnia and Herzegovina travel ban and restrictions in 2020 ...

    visalist.io/bosnia-and-herzegovina/travel/advice

    The travel advice is Do not travel to Bosnia and Herzegovina. Get travel ban, restrictions alerts and advice before travelling to Bosnia and Herzegovina. Bosnia and Herzegovina is part of Europe with main city at Sarajevo. Its Developed country with a population of 4M people. The main currency is Convertible Mark. The languages spoken are Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian.