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  1. Casimir III the Great - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casimir_III_the_Great

    Casimir III the Great (Polish: Kazimierz III Wielki; 30 April 1310 – 5 November 1370) reigned as the King of Poland from 1333 to 1370. He was the third son of Władysław I the Elbow-high and Jadwiga of Kalisz, and the last Polish king from the Piast dynasty. Casimir inherited a kingdom weakened by war and made it prosperous and wealthy.

  2. Casimir III | king of Poland | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Casimir-III

    Casimir III, king of Poland from 1333 to 1370, called “the Great” because he was deemed a peaceful ruler, a “peasant king,” and a skillful diplomat. Through astute diplomacy he annexed lands from western Russia and eastern Germany. Within his realm he unified the government, codified its unwritten

  3. Casimir III the Great | Historipedia Official Wiki | Fandom

    historipediaofficial.wikia.org/wiki/Casimir_III...
    • The Great King
    • Concession to The Nobility
    • Relationship with Polish Jews
    • Title and Style
    • See Also
    • External Links

    Casimir is the only Polish king who both received and kept the title of "Great" in Polish history (Bolesław I Chrobry is also called "Great", but his title Chrobry (Valiant) is now more common). When he came to the throne, his hold on it was in danger, as even his neighbours did not recognise his title and instead called him "king of Kraków". The economywas ruined, and the kingdom was depopulated and exhausted by war. Upon his death, Casimir left a kingdom which had doubled in size (mostly through the addition of lands in modern day Ukraine, then called the Duchy of Halicz), was prosperous, wealthy and held great prospects for the future. Although depicted as a peaceful king in children's books, he in fact waged many victorious wars and was readying for others just before he died. He built extensively during his reign, (Wawel Castle, Orle Gniazda), reformed the Polish army and the Polish civil and criminal law. At the Sejm in Wiślica, on 11 March 1347, he introduced salutary legal r...

    In order to enlist the support of the nobility, especially the military help of pospolite ruszenie, Casimir was forced to grant important privileges to their caste, which made them finally clearly dominant over townsfolk (burghers or mieszczaństwo). In 1335, in the Treaty of Trentschin, Casimir relinquished "in perpetuity" his claims to Silesia. In 1355 in Buda, Casimir designated Louis I of Hungary as his successor. In exchange, the szlachta's tax burden was reduced and they would no longer be required to pay for military expeditions expenses outside Poland. Those important concessions would eventually lead to the ultimately crippling rise of the unique nobles' democracy in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.[citation needed] His second daughter, Elisabeth, Duchess of Pomerania, bore a son in 1351, Casimir IV of Pomerania. He was slated to become the heir, but did not succeed to the throne, dying childless in 1377, 7 years after King Casimir. He was the only male descendant of King...

    King Casimir was favorably disposed toward Jews. On 9 October 1334, he confirmed the privileges granted to Jewish Poles in 1264 by Bolesław V the Chaste. Under penalty of death, he prohibited the kidnapping of Jewish children for the purpose of enforced Christian baptism. He inflicted heavy punishment for the desecration of Jewish cemeteries. Although Jews had lived in Poland since before the reign of King Casimir, he allowed them to settle in Poland in great numbers and protected them as people of the king.

    Casimir's full title was: Casimir by the grace of God king of Poland, lord and heir of the land of Kraków, Sandomierz, Sieradz, Łęczyca, Kuyavia, Pomerania (Pomerelia) and Ruthenia. The title in Latin was: Kazimirus, Dei gracia rex Poloniæ ac terrarum Cracoviæ, Sandomiriæ, Syradiæ, Lanciciæ, Cuyaviæ, Pomeraniæ, Russiequæ dominus et heres.[citation needed]

    History of Poland (966–1385)
    Jagiellonian University
    Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz
    Kazimierz

    His listing in "Medieval lands" by Charles Cawley. The project "involves extracting and analysing detailed information from primary sources, including contemporary chronicles, cartularies, necrolog...

    • 30 April 1310(1310-04-30) Kowal, Poland
    • Władysław I ("the Elbow-high")
    • Wawel Cathedral, Kraków
    • Christianity
  4. Casimir III the Great - Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge ...

    infogalactic.com/info/Casimir_III_the_Great
    • The Great King
    • Society Under The Reign of Casimir
    • Relationship with Polish Jews
    • Relationships and Children
    • Title and Style
    • Gallery
    • See Also
    • External Links

    When Casimir attained the throne in 1333, his position was in danger, as his neighbours did not recognise his title and instead called him "king of Kraków". The kingdom was depopulated and exhausted by war, and the economy was ruined. In 1335, in the Treaty of Trentschin, Casimir was forced to relinquish his claims to Silesia"in perpetuity". Casimir rebuilt and his kingdom became prosperous and wealthy, with great prospects for the future. He waged many victorious wars and doubled the size of the kingdom, mostly through addition of lands in modern-day Ukraine (then called the Duchy of Halych). Casimir built extensively during his reign, including Wawel Castle and Orle Gniazda, and he reformed the Polish army At the Sejm in Wiślica, on 11 March 1347, Casimir introduced reforms to the Polish judicial system and sanctioned civil and criminal codes for Great and Lesser Poland, earning the title "the Polish Justinian". He founded the University of Kraków, the oldest Polish University, an...

    Casimir was facetiously named "the Peasants' King". He introduced the codes of law of Greater and Lesser Poland as an attempt to end the overwhelming superiority of the nobility. During his reign all three major classes — the nobility, priesthood, and bourgeoisie — were more or less counterbalanced, allowing Casimir to strengthen his monarchic position. He was known for siding with the weak when the law did not protect them from nobles and clergymen. He reportedly even supported a peasant whose house had been demolished by his own mistress, after she had ordered it to be pulled down because it disturbed her enjoyment of the beautiful landscape. {citation needed}

    Casimir was favorably disposed toward Jews. On 9 October 1334, he confirmed the privileges granted to Jewish Poles in 1264 by Bolesław V the Chaste. Under penalty of death, he prohibited the kidnapping of Jewish children for the purpose of enforced Christian baptism, and he inflicted heavy punishment for the desecration of Jewish cemeteries. While Jews had lived in Poland since before his reign, Casimir allowed them to settle in Poland in great numbers and protected them as people of the king.

    Casimir III was born in Kowal, and he married four times. Casimir first married Anna, or Aldona Ona, the daughter of Grand Duke Gediminas of Lithuania. The marriage produced two daughters, Cunigunde (d. 1357), who was married to Louis VI the Roman, the son of Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor, and Elisabeth, who was married to Duke Bogislaus V of Pomerania. Aldona died in 1339, and Casimir then married Adelaide of Hesse. He divorced Adelaide in 1356, married Christina, divorced her, and while Adelaide and possibly Christina were still alive (ca. 1365), he married Hedwig of Głogów and Sagan. He had three daughters by his fourth wife, and they were still very young when he died, and regarded as of dubious legitimacy because of Casimir's bigamy.

    Casimir's full title was: Casimir by the grace of God king of Poland and Russia (Ruthenia), lord and heir of the land of Kraków, Sandomierz, Sieradz, Łęczyca, Kuyavia, Pomerania (Pomerelia). The title in Latin was: Kazimirus, Dei gratia rex Polonie et Russie, nec non Cracovie, Sandomirie, Siradie, Lancicie, Cuiavie, et Pomeranieque Terrarum et Ducatuum Dominus et Heres.

    The King's sarcophagus at Wawel Cathedral
    Effigy of Casimir from his own tomb erected by his nephewaround 1371
    Kazimierz the Great, by Marcello Bacciarelli
    Kazimierz the Great, by Jan Matejko

    His listing in "Medieval lands" by Charles Cawley. The project "involves extracting and analysing detailed information from primary sources, including contemporary chronicles, cartularies, necrolog...

    • 25 April 1333
    • Władysław I ("the Elbow-high")
  5. CASIMIR III., THE GREAT - JewishEncyclopedia.com

    jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/4098-casimir-iii-the-great

    Casimir appears to have protected the Jews against outbreaks of the mob in 1348, for the groundless accusation of the poisoning of wells by the Jews had traveled from Germany into Poland and had roused the populace against the latter.

  6. Casimir III the Great of Poland (1310-1370) | Familypedia ...

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/Casimir_III_the_Great...
    • The Great King
    • Concession to The Nobility
    • Relationship with Polish Jews
    • Title and Style
    • See Also
    • External Links

    Casimir is the only Polish king who both received and kept the title of the Great in Polish history (Bolesław I Chrobry is also called the Great, but his title Chrobry (Valiant) is now more common). When he received the crown, his hold on it was in danger, as even his neighbours did not recognise his title and instead called him "king of Kraków". The economy was ruined, and the country was depopulated and exhausted by war. Upon his death, he left a country doubled in size (mostly through the addition of land in today's Ukraine, then the Duchy of Halicz), prosperous, wealthy and with great prospects for the future. Although he is depicted as a peaceful king in children's books, he in fact waged many victorious wars and was readying for others just before he died. Casimir the Great built many new castles (including Wawel Castle), reformed the Polish army and Polish civil and criminal law. At the Sejm in Wiślica, 11 March 1347, he introduced salutary legal reforms in the jurisprudence...

    In order to enlist the support of the nobility, especially the military help of pospolite ruszenie, Casimir was forced to grant important privileges to their caste, which made them finally clearly dominant over townsfolk (burghers or mieszczaństwo). In 1335, in the Treaty of Trentschin, Casimir relinquished "in perpetuity" his claims to Silesia. In 1355 in Buda, Casimir designated Louis I of Hungary as his successor. In exchange, the szlachta's tax burden was reduced and they would no longer be required to pay for military expeditions expenses outside Poland. Those important concessions would eventually lead to the ultimately crippling rise of the unique nobles' democracy in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. His second daughter, Elisabeth, Duchess of Pomerania, bore a son in 1351, Casimir IV of Pomerania. He was slated to become the heir, but did not succeed to the throne, dying childless in 1377, 7 years after King Casimir. He was the only male descendant of King Casimir who live...

    King Casimir was favorably disposed toward Jews. On 9 October 1334, he confirmed the privileges granted to Jewish Poles in 1264 by Bolesław V the Chaste. Under penalty of death, he prohibited the kidnapping of Jewish children for the purpose of enforced Christian baptism. He inflicted heavy punishment for the desecration of Jewish cemeteries. Although Jews had lived in Poland since before the reign of King Casimir, he allowed them to settle in Poland in great numbers and protected them as people of the king.

    Casimir's full title was: Casimir by the grace of God king of Poland, lord and heir of the land of Kraków, Sandomierz, Sieradz, Łęczyca, Kuyavia, Pomerania (Pomerelia) and Ruthenia. The title in Latin was: Kazimirus, Dei gracia rex Poloniæ ac terrarum Cracoviæ, Sandomiriæ, Syradiæ, Lanciciæ, Cuyaviæ, Pomeraniæ, Russiequæ dominus et heres.

    History of Poland (966–1385)
    Jagiellonian University
    Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz
    Kazimierz

    His listing in "Medieval lands" by Charles Cawley. The project "involves extracting and analysing detailed information from primary sources, including contemporary chronicles, cartularies, necrolog...

    • Adelaide of Hesse (1324-1371)
    • Cudka
    • Christina Rokiczanka (c1330-c1375)
    • 1325
  7. casimir iii the great : definition of casimir iii the great ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/casimir iii the great/en-en

    Casimir III the Great (Polish: Kazimierz Wielki) (30 April 1310 – 5 November 1370), last King of Poland from the Piast dynasty (reigned 1333–1370), was the son of King Władysław I the Elbow-high and Hedwig of Kalisz. Born in Kowal, Casimir the Great first married Anna, or Aldona Ona, the daughter of the Prince of Lithuania, Gediminas.

  8. King Casimir III the Great, III (1310 - 1370) - Genealogy

    www.geni.com/people/Casimir-the-Great-King-of...

    Jul 27, 2018 · Casimir III the Great (Polish: Kazimierz Wielki; April 30 1310 – November 5, 1370), last King of Poland from the Piast dynasty (1333–1370), was the son of King Władysław I the Elbow-high and Jadwiga of Gniezno and Greater Poland.

  9. Casimir III (Civ5) | Civilization Wiki | Fandom

    civilization.fandom.com/wiki/Casimir_III_(Civ5)
    • Overview
    • In-Game
    • Civilopedia entry

    Casimir III the Great (30 April 1310 – 5 November 1370), known as Kazimierz Wielki in Polish, was the last monarch of Poland from the Piast dynasty. During his reign Poland experienced a golden age.

    Casimir III is the leader of the Poles in Civilization V: Brave New World. He speaks modern Polish with some old-fashioned words. He is seen standing in front of his castle, on the bascule bridge, with his royal scepter in hand. When defeated, he takes off his crown.

    King Casimir III, the only Polish king to earn the subsequent title of "the Great," reigned during the 14th century AD and established himself as a decisive and able ruler, relying on his skill in diplomacy and sensible decision-making to greatly improve the well-being of ...

    Although the second son of Wladyslaw, Casimir was schooled in all things necessary for kingship in medieval Europe. Upon the death of Casimir's elder brother in 1312 AD, he was made heir and placed in the care of Jaroslaw, later to be archbishop of Gniezno and one of Casimir ......

    Not long after ascending to the throne, Casimir was forced to deal with a number of political issues, not the least the unrest of the Polish nobility. In order to strengthen Poland's military, which relied heavily on the cooperation of the Polish nobles, Casimir was forced ...

    • 1370 AD
    • Domination Victory
    • Polish
    • King of Poland
  10. The King of Poland from 1333 to 1370. He was the last Polish king from the Piast dynasty, born on 30 April 1310 in Kowal, died on 5 November 1370 in Kraków. He was the youngest, third son of King Wladyslaw I (“the Elbow-high”) and Duchess Jadwiga of Kalisz. When Casimir attained the throne in 1333, his position was in danger, as his neighbors did not recognize his title. The Polish ...