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  1. Charles I of Austria - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Charles_I_of_Austria

    Charles was born on 17 August 1887, in the Castle of Persenbeug, in Lower Austria.His parents were Archduke Otto Franz of Austria and Princess Maria Josepha of Saxony.At the time, his great-uncle Franz Joseph reigned as Emperor of Austria and King of Hungary.

  2. Charles (I) | emperor of Austria | Britannica

    www.britannica.com › Charles-I-emperor-of-Austria

    Charles (I), (born August 17, 1887, Persenbeug Castle, Austria—died April 1, 1922, Quinta do Monte, Madeira), emperor (Kaiser) of Austria and, as Charles IV, king of Hungary, the last ruler of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy (November 21, 1916–November 11, 1918).

  3. Charles I of Austria | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Charles_I_of_Austria
    • Early Life
    • Marriage
    • Heir Presumptive
    • Reign
    • Proclamation of 11 November
    • Attempts to Reclaim Throne of Hungary
    • Exile in Madeira and Death
    • Assessment
    • Beatification
    • Quotes

    Charles was born on 17 August 1887 in the Castle of Persenbeug in Lower Austria. His parents were Archduke Otto Franz of Austria and Princess Maria Josepha of Saxony. At the time, his granduncle Franz Joseph reigned as Emperor of Austria and King of Hungary, and his uncle Franz Ferdinandbecame heir presumptive two years later. Platinum Collection Build Your Own Bundle. Choose up to 7 games Fandom may earn an affiliate commission on sales made from links on this page. As a child, Charles was reared a devout Roman Catholic. He spent his early years wherever his father's regiment happened to be stationed; later on he lived in Vienna and Reichenau. He was privately educated, but, contrary to the custom ruling in the imperial family, he attended a public gymnasium for the sake of demonstrations in scientific subjects. On the conclusion of his studies at the gymnasium, he entered the army, spending the years from 1906-1908 as an officer chiefly in Prague, where he studied law and politica...

    In 1911, Charles married Princess Zita of Bourbon-Parma. They had met as children but did not see one another for almost ten years, as each pursued their education. In 1909, his Dragoon regiment was stationed at Brandeis an der Elbe (Brandýs nad Labem), from where he visited his aunt at Franzensbad.:5 It was during one of these visits that Charles and Zita became reacquainted.:5 Due to Franz Ferdinand's morganatic marriage, his children were excluded from the succession. As a result, the Emperor severely pressured Charles to marry. Zita not only shared Charles' devout Catholicism, but also an impeccably royal lineage.:16Zita later recalled,

    Charles became heir presumptive after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo in 1914, the event which precipitated World War I. Only at this time did the old Emperor, moved by an innate sense of duty, take steps to initiate the heir-presumptive to his crown in affairs of state. But the outbreak of World War I interfered with this political education. Charles spent his time during the first phase of the war at headquarters at Teschen, but exercised no military influence. Charles then became a Generalfeldmarschall in the Austro-Hungarian Army. In the spring of 1916, in connection with the offensive against Italy, he was entrusted with the command of the XX. Corps, whose affections the heir-presumptive to the throne won by his affability and friendliness. The offensive, after a successful start, soon came to a standstill. Shortly afterwards, Charles went to the eastern front as commander of an army operating against the Russians and Romanians.

    Charles succeeded to the thrones in November 1916, after the death of Emperor Franz Joseph. On 2 December 1916, he took over the title of Supreme Commander of the whole army from Archduke Frederick. His coronation occurred on 30 December. In 1917, Charles secretly entered into peace negotiations with France. He employed his brother-in-law, Prince Sixtus of Bourbon-Parma, an officer in the Belgian Army, as intermediary. Although his foreign minister, Ottokar Czernin, was only interested in negotiating a general peace which would include Germany, Charles himself went much further in suggesting his willingness to make a separate peace. When news of the overture leaked in April 1918, Charles denied involvement until French Prime Minister Georges Clemenceaupublished letters signed by him. This led to Czernin's resignation, forcing Austria-Hungary into an even more dependent position with respect to its seemingly wronged German ally. The Austro-Hungarian Empire was wracked by inner turmoi...

    On 11 November 1918—the same day as the armistice ending the war between allies and Germany—Charles issued a carefully worded proclamation in which he recognized the Austrian people's right to determine the form of the state and "relinquish(ed) every participation in the administration of the State." He also released his officials from their oath of loyalty to him. On the same day the Imperial Family left Schönbrunn and moved to Castle Eckartsau, east of Vienna. On 13 November, following a visit of Hungarian magnates, Charles issued a similar proclamation for Hungary. Although it has widely been cited as an "abdication", that word was never mentioned in either proclamation. Indeed, he deliberately avoided using the word abdicationin the hope that the people of either Austria or Hungary would vote to recall him. Privately, Charles left no doubt that he believed himself to be the rightful emperor. Addressing Cardinal Friedrich Gustav Piffl, he wrote: Instead, on 12 November, the day a...

    Encouraged by Hungarian royalists ("legitimists"), Charles sought twice in 1921 to reclaim the throne of Hungary, but failed largely because Hungary's regent, Miklós Horthy (the last admiral of the Austro-Hungarian Navy), refused to support him. Horthy's failure to support Charles' restoration attempts is often described as "treasonous" by royalists. Critics suggest that Horthy's actions were more firmly grounded in political reality than those of Charles and his supporters. Indeed, the neighbouring countries had threatened to invade Hungary if Charles tried to regain the throne. Later in 1921, the Hungarian parliament formally nullified the Pragmatic Sanction—an act that effectively dethroned the Habsburgs.

    After the second failed attempt at restoration in Hungary, Charles and pregnant Zita were briefly quarantined at Tihany Abbey. On 1 November 1921 they were taken to the Danube harbor city of Baja, made to board the British monitor HMS Glowworm, and were removed to the Black Sea where they were transferred to the light cruiser HMS Cardiff.They arrived in their final exile, the Portuguese island of Madeira, on 19 November 1921. Determined to prevent a third restoration attempt, the Council of Allied Powers had agreed on Madeira because it was isolated in the Atlantic and easily guarded. Originally the couple and their children (who joined them only on 2 February 1922) lived at Funchal at the Villa Vittoria, next to Reid's Hotel, and later moved to Quinta do Monte. Compared to the imperial glory in Vienna and even at Eckartsau, conditions there were certainly impoverished. Charles would not leave Madeira again. On 9 March 1922 he caught a cold walking into town and developed bronchitis...

    Historians have been mixed in their evaluations of Charles and his reign. One of the most critical has been Helmut Rumpler, head of the Habsburg commission of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, who has described Charles as "a dilettante, far too weak for the challenges facing him, out of his depth, and not really a politician." However, others have seen Charles as a brave and honourable figure who tried as Emperor-King to halt World War I. The English writer, Herbert Vivian, wrote: Furthermore, Anatole France, the French novelist, stated: Field Marshall Paul von Hindenburg, who at the time of Charles' reign was the commander in chief of the Imperial German Army, commented in his memoirs:

    Catholic Church leaders have praised Charles for putting his Christian faith first in making political decisions, and for his role as a peacemaker during the war, especially after 1917. They have considered that his brief rule expressed Roman Catholic social teaching, and that he created a social legal framework that in part still survives. Pope John Paul II declared Charles "Blessed" in a beatification ceremony held on 3 October 2004,and stated: From the beginning, the Emperor Charles conceived of his office as a holy service to his people. His chief concern was to follow the Christian vocation to holiness also in his political actions. For this reason, his thoughts turned to social assistance. The cause or campaign for his canonization began in 1949, when testimony of his holiness was collected in the Archdiocese of Vienna. In 1954, the cause was opened and he was declared "servant of God", the first step in the process. The League of Prayers established for the promotion of his c...

    "Now, we must help each other to get to Heaven."Addressing Empress Zita on 22 October 1911, the day after their wedding.

  4. Charles I of Austria - New World Encyclopedia

    www.newworldencyclopedia.org › entry › Charles_I_of
    • Reign
    • Final Decades of The Austrian-Hungarian Empire
    • Legacy
    • Recognition in The Roman Catholic Church
    • Official Title of Karl I
    • References

    Peace efforts

    In 1917, the unsuccessful American offer of mediation to end World War I prompted Charles, desperately trying to put an end to the war, toward secret negotiations with France as a representative of the Ententepowers. With the aid of his wife Zita's brother, Prince Sixtus of Bourbon-Parma, he was able instead to make his most bold initiative for peace. Two of Zita's brothers, including Sixtus, were serving with the Belgians, Austria's enemy. Through Sixtus, Charles made a peace offer to the Al...

    Attempts to save the monarchy

    The Austro-Hungarian Empire was wracked by inner turmoil in the final years of the war, with much tension between ethnic groups. U.S. President Woodrow Wilson in 1918 demanded that the monarchy allow for the self-determination of its peoples as part of his Fourteen Points. In response, Emperor Charles agreed to reconvene the Imperial Parliament and allow for the creation of a confederation with each national group exercising self-governance. However, the reforms quickly spiraled out of contro...

    Nineteenth century

    The Habsburg Monarchy began showing signs of decline in the nineteenth century, when Emperor Francis Joseph (1848–1916) lost control of Italy and Prussia, with the latter taken over by Germany. Moreover, Russiaproved to be a challenger in the Balkans. In 1867 the Habsburgs redrew the boundaries of their lands to create the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. At the same time, the task of ruling the lands became increasingly more difficult with a plethora of nationalities vying for control of their own...

    Twentieth century

    The twentieth century brought with it the culmination in the Balkan discontent, with Bosnia and Serbia stepping up national demands. In 1913, Austria was mulling military action against Serbia but could not follow through for lack of support from Italy and Germany. Instead, the Austro-Hungarian Empire saw its territory shrink in the Balkan peninsula, with the consequence of pushing the Turks out of Europe. It was increasingly difficult to maneuver among demands of individual nations of the Em...

    World War I

    The declaration of the war became imminent when Archduke Francis Ferdinand, the heir of Francis Joseph, was assassinated by a Bosnian nationalist at Sarajevo on June 28, 1914, an event that served as a pretext for curbing the Serbian threat. Supported by Germany, the Austro-Hungarian foreign office officially assigned responsibility for the assassination to the Serbian government. This was to the dislike of the Hungarian prime minister, István, Count Tisza, who feared that a military action a...

    Historians have been mixed in their evaluations of Charles I's reign. Helmut Rumpler, head of the Habsburg commission of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, has described Karl as "a dilettante, far too weak for the challenges facing him, out of his depth, and not really a politician." On the other hand, others laud him as a brave and honorable figure who strove to halt World War I. English writer Herbert Vivian wrote: "Karl was a great leader, a prince of peace, who wanted to save the world from a year of war; a statesman with ideas to save his people from the complicated problems of his empire; a king who loved his people, a fearless man, a noble soul, distinguished, a saint from whose grave blessings come." French novelist Anatole France stated: "Emperor Karl is the only decent man to come out of the war in a leadership position, yet he was a saint and no one listened to him. He sincerely wanted peace, and therefore was despised by the whole world. It was a wonderful chance that was...

    The Roman Catholic Church has praised Charles I (Karl I) for putting his Christian faith first in making political decisions, and for his recognized role as a peacemaker during the war, especially after 1917. He was the first, and only, world leader during World War Iwho banned the use of poison gas. Christoph Cardinal Schönborn of Vienna became the Church's sponsor for his beatification. This process began in 1949 when testimony was collected in the Archdiocese of Vienna regarding his life. Beatification is a necessary step towards being declared a saint, following being declared venerable and prior to the step of canonization (recognized sainthood). In 1954 he was declared venerable. 1. On April 14, 2003, the Vatican's Congregation for the Causes of Saints in the presence of Pope John Paul II promulgated Karl of Austria's "heroic virtues." 2. On December 21, 2003, the Congregation certified, on the basis of three expert medical opinions, that a miracle in 1960 occurred through the...

    His Imperial and Royal Apostolic Majesty, Charles the First, By the Grace of God,Emperor of Austrian Empire,Apostolic King of Hungary, of this name the Fourth, King of Bohemia, Dalmatia, Croatia, Slavonia, and Galicia, Lodomeria, and Illyria; King of Jerusalem etc., Archduke of Austria; Grand Duke of Tuscany and Cracow, Duke of Lorraine and of Salzburg, of Styria, of Carinthia, of Carniola and of the Bukovina; Grand Prince of Transylvania; Margrave of Moravia; Duke of Upper and Lower Silesia, of Duchy of Modena, Duchy of Parma, Piacenza and Guastalla, of Oświęcim (Auschwitz) and Zator, of Teschen, Friuli, Dubrovnik and Zadar; Princely Count of Habsburg and Tyrol, of Kyburg, Gorizia and Gradisca; Prince of Trento and Brixen; Margrave of Upper and Lower Lusatia and in Istria; Count of Hohenems, Feldkirch, Vorarlberg, Bregenz, Sonnenberg, etc.; Lord of Trieste, of Kotor, and in the Wendish Mark; Grosswojwod of the Voivodship of Serbia and Tamiš Banat etc. etc.

    Flenley, Ralph. 1970. Makers of nineteenth-century Europe. Essay index reprint series. London: J.M. Dent. ISBN 0836915712
    Harding, Bertita. 1939. Imperial twilight; the story of Karl and Zita of Hungary.Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Co.
    Kann, Robert A. A History of the Habsburg Empire: 1526–1918. Berkeley; and London: University of California Press, 1974. ISBN 0520024087.
    Zessner-Spitzenberg, Hans Karl, and Katharina Rasinger. 1963. The Emperor Charles I of Austria, a great Christian monarch; a short history of his life and death.London: K. Rasinger.
  5. Charles I Of Austria Biography - Childhood, Life Achievements ...

    www.thefamouspeople.com › profiles › charles-i-of

    Charles I of Austria was born on August 17, 1887 in the Castle of Persenbeug to Archduke Otto Franz of Austria and Princess Maria Josepha of Saxony. He was the grandnephew of Franz Joseph, who then reigned as the Emperor of Austria and King of Hungary. Raised as a devout Catholic, young Charles had a religious bent of mind.

  6. Charles I of Austria | History Wiki | Fandom

    history.wikia.org › wiki › Charles_I_of_Austria
    • Early Life
    • Reign
    • Later Life

    Charles was the son of Philip the Handsome, the son of Emperor Maximilian I, and Joanna the Mad of Castile. He was born in Ghent, County of Flandria, Belgium, on 24 February 1500. Charles grew up in Malines, Duchy of Brabantia, Belgium, until the age of 17 (during the Middle Ages, you were an adult at the age of 15!) in 1517, and was tutored by the later Pope Hadrian IV. During his childhood Charles made frequent visits to Paris. He succeeded his father in the Burgundian possessions, i.e. Belgica Regia and Burgundy, after his father's death in 1506, although his aunt Margaret of Austria acted as his regent until he came of age in 1515. In 1516 following the death of his grandfather King Ferdinand II the Catholic, Charles inherited Aragon, Naples, Sicily, Sardinia, and Navarre, and the guardian of his insane mother and became the regent of Castile, Granada and Spanish America. When his other grandfather Emperor Maximilian died in 1519, Charles inherited his possessions in Austria and...

    In Spain

    Charles arrived in Spain in 1517, and he spent of the rest of his life there. On his first arrival he came to meet his regent Jiménez de Cisneros however Jiménez fell sick and died along the way, and it was suspected Charles had him poisoned. The Spanish were uneasy with his Imperial style and foreign upbringing. Prior to his reign, the kings in Spain were bound by laws under contract with the people. Charles established himself as an absolute ruler, although he did not legally become the kin...

    In Belgica Regia

    Charles was in his minority when he succeeded his father in the Burgundian possessions in 1506, so his aunt Margaret of Austria was his regent. Margaret ruled the territories well and was an effective mediatary between the Emperor and the Burgundian subjects. She negotiated a treaty of commerce with England favourable to the famous Belgian clothmakers, and participated in the creation of the League of Cambraiin 1508. When Charles came of age in 1515 he rebelled against her influence, but soon...

    The Completion of Belgica Regia and the emergence of Holland

    In order to try and prevent Protestantism from developing in the County of Holland, in 1522 he established an inquisition. Charles expanded Belgica Regia through the annexation of Utrecht, Groningen, and Gelders. As many of the territories were fiefs of either France or the Empire, he instituted the Pragmatic Sanction of 1549which declared Belgica Regia to be a separate domain and his family would be its heirs. Political dissention was fiercely controlled, and in 1550 the death penalty was ma...

    In 1556 Charles abdicated his various positions and retired to the monastery in Yuste, Spain, although he kept himself informed on the affairs of the empire. The Holy Roman Empire and Austria were passed to his brother Ferdinand, and Spain and Italy were passed to his son Philip. Charles died of gout on 21 September 1558.

  7. Charles I of Austria | Central Victory Wiki | Fandom

    central-victory.wikia.org › wiki › Charles_I_of_Austria
    • Early Life
    • Marriage
    • Heir Presumptive
    • Reign
    • Death
    • Official Grand Title

    Charles was born 17 August 1887 in the Castle of Persenbeug in Lower Austria. His parents were Archduke Otto Franz of Austria and Princess Maria Josepha of Saxony. At the time, his great uncle Franz Joseph reigned as Emperor of Austria and King of Hungary. Upon the death of Crown Prince Rudolph in 1889, the Emperor's brother, Archduke Karl Ludwig, was next in line to the Austro-Hungarian throne. However, his death in 1896 from typhoid made his eldest son, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the new heir presumptive. As a child, Archduke Charles was reared a devout Roman Catholic. He spent his early years wherever his father's regiment happened to be stationed; later on he lived in Vienna and Reichenau an der Rax. He was privately educated, but, contrary to the custom ruling in the imperial family, he attended a public gymnasium for the sake of demonstrations in scientific subjects. On the conclusion of his studies at the gymnasium, he entered the army, spending the years from 1906 to 1908 as...

    In 1911, Charles married Princess Zita of Bourbon-Parma. They had met as children but did not see one another for almost ten years, as each pursued their education. In 1909, his Dragoon regiment was stationed at Brandýs nad Labem (Brandeis an der Elbe) in Bohemia, from where he visited his aunt at Franzensbad. It was during one of these visits that Charles and Zita became reacquainted. Due to Franz Ferdinand's morganatic marriagein 1900, his children were excluded from the succession. As a result, the Emperor pressured Charles to marry. Zita not only shared Charles' devout Catholicism, but also an impeccable royal lineage. Zita later recalled:

    Charles became heir presumptive after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo in 1914, the event which precipitated the World War. Only at this time did the old Emperor take steps to initiate the heir-presumptive to his crown in affairs of state. But the outbreak of the World War interfered with this political education. Charles spent his time during the first phase of the war at headquarters at Teschen, but exercised no military influence. Charles then became a Feldmarschall (Field Marshal) in the Austro-Hungarian Army. In the spring of 1916, in connection with the offensive against Italy, he was entrusted with the command of the XX. Corps, whose affections the heir-presumptive to the throne won by his affability and friendliness. The offensive, after a successful start, soon came to a standstill. Shortly afterwards, Charles went to the eastern front as commander of an army operating against the Russians and Romanians.

    Charles succeeded to the thrones in November 1916, after the death of Emperor Franz Joseph. On 2 December 1916, he assumed the title of Supreme Commander of the whole army from Archduke Frederick. His coronation occurred 30 December. In 1917, Charles secretly entered into peace negotiations with France. He employed his brother-in-law, Prince Sixtus of Bourbon-Parma, an officer in the Belgian Army, as intermediary. Although his foreign minister, Ottokar Czernin, was only interested in negotiating a general peace which would include Germany, Charles himself went much further in suggesting his willingness to make a separate peace. When news of the overture leaked in April 1918, Charles denied involvement until French Prime Minister Georges Clemenceaupublished letters signed by him. This led to Czernin's resignation, forcing Austria-Hungary into an even more dependent position with respect to its seemingly wronged German ally. The Austro-Hungarian Empire was wracked by inner turmoil in...

    After the events in Hungary had calmed, Charles and his family enjoyed a period of considerable popularity through out their realm. On 1 March 1922 the entire family went on holiday to the Portuguese island of Madeira. On 9 March 1922 he caught cold walking into town which developed bronchitis and subsequently progressed to severe pneumonia. Having suffered two heart attacks while returning to Vienna, he died of respiratory failure 1 April in the presence of his wife (who was pregnant with their eighth child) and 9-year-old Crown Prince Otto, retaining consciousness almost to the last moment. His remains except for his heart were interred in the Habsburg Cryptin Vienna. His heart and the heart of his wife are in the monastery of Muri Switzerland.

    His Imperial and Royal Apostolic Majesty, Charles the First, By the Grace of God,Emperor of Austria,Apostolic King of Hungary,King of Bohemia, Croatia, Galicia, Lodomeria, and Venetia; King of Jerusalem, Archduke of Austria; Grand Duke of Slovakia, Tuscany and Cracow, Duke of Lorraine and of Salzburg, of Styria, of Carinthia, of Carniola and of the Bukovina; Grand Prince of Transylvania; Margrave of Moravia; Duke of Upper and Lower Silesia, of Modena, Parma, Piacenza and Guastalla, of Auschwitz and Zator, of Teschen, Friuli, Ragusa and Zara; Princely Count of Habsburg and Tyrol, of Kyburg, Gorizia and Gradisca; Prince of Trent and Brixen; Margrave of Upper and Lower Lusatia and in Istria; Count of Hohenems, Feldkirch, Bregenz, Sonnenberg; Lord of Trieste, of Cattaro, and in the Windic March; Grand Voivode of the Voivodship of Serbia.

    • Early Life
    • Heir Presumptive
    • Reign
    • Proclamation
    • Personal Life

    Charles, I of Austria was born onAugust 17, 1887, in Persenbeug in Lower Austria to Archduke Otto Franz of Austria and Princess Maria Josepha of Saxony. His granduncle, Franz Joseph, was at this period the Emperor of Austria and King of Hungary and two years later, his uncle Franz Ferdinand became the heir presumptive. Charles, I of Austria was brought up in the in the Roman Catholic faith and spent his childhood life at any place his father’s regiment was stationed. Charles I of Austrialater spent part of his early years in Vienna and Reichenau an de Rax. He received a private education, but also attended public gymnasium, which was contrary to the custom ruling in the imperial family. After his education, Charles I of Austria was enlisted in the army from serving as the officer chiefly in Prague from 1906 to 1908. Aside from his military duties there, Charles I of Austria also studied law and political duties. Charles was declared of age, and Prince Zdenko Lobkowitz appointed his...

    In 1914, the Yugoslav nationalist Gavrilo Princip assassinated the heir presumptive, Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo. This assassination triggered the World War I that year. The assassination made Charles became the heir presumptive to the throne. As Charles I of Austria was not much briefed with the affairs of the state, the Emporer, King Franz Joseph took the time to initiate him through the process. However, this process halted during the outbreak of the World War I. Though he was not much involved in the first face of the war, Charles I of Austria spent time at the headquarters in Teschen. Charles I of Austrialater became a Feldmarschall (Field Marshal) in the Austro-Hungarian Army.

    In November 1916, Charles I of Austria ascended to the throne after the death of Emperor Franz Joseph. Charles I of Austria then took over as the Supreme Commander of the whole army from Archduke Friedrich on December 2, 1916. This was followed with his official coronation as the King of Hungary on December 30, same year. After assuming the throne, Charles I of Austriasecretly commenced a negotiation with France using his brother in law, Prince Sixtus of Bourbon-Parma as the intermediary. However, the thing could not work out as the Allies demanded that Austrian recognize the Italian claims of territory. Charles, I of Austria wanted to seek separate peace process contrary to the views of his foreign minister, Graf Czermin, who preferred negotiations for general peace. This negotiation leaked in April 1918, of which Charles I of Austriadenied vehemently until the French Prime Minister, Georges Clemenceau, published letters signed by Charles. This resulted in the resignation of Czermi...

    Charles I of Austria issued a proclamation on November 11, 1918, recognizing the right of the people of Austria’s right to choose their form of state and therefore relinquished his participation in the administration of the State. With this, Charles released all his officials from their oath of loyalty and left the Schonbrunn Palace to Castle Eckartsau in the east of Vienna. Charles I of Austria also issued the same proclamation to Hungary two days later. Though he issued the proclamations, Charles, I of Austria never stated he had abdicated the throne in the proclamation, hoping the people of Hungary of Austria would recall him. To him, Charles I of Austrianever felt bound by the proclamation. Charles I of Austria then left for Switzerland without abdicating from the throne, which caused the Austrian parliament to the Habsburg Law on April 3, 1919, which barred Charles I of Austriafrom returning to Austria. Other members of the Habsburg family were banished from Austria territories...

    Charles I of Austria married PrincessZita of Bourbon-Parma in 1911. The two met in their childhood years but lost sight of each other for about ten years due to their education. His uncle, Franz Ferdinand had a morganatic marriage so his children were unfit to ascend the throne and therefore he pressured Charles I of Austriato marry of which Zita was a better candidate due to her royal lineage. They had eight children, Crown Prince Otto, Archduchess Adelheid, Archduke Robert, Archduke Felix, Archduke Karl Ludwig, Archduke Rudolf, Archduchess Charlotte and Archduchess Elisabeth. Charles died on April 1, 1922, of respiratory failure. He had previously developed bronchitis which transformed into pneumonia. He was interred in Madeira where he was exiled in the Church of Our Lady of Monte and his heart with that of his wife also buried in Muri Abbey, Switzerland. There have been several unsuccessful attempts to move his remains to the Habsburg Crypt in Vienna.

  8. Pope to beatify 'buffoon' who was Austria's last emperor ...

    www.theguardian.com › world › 2004

    Jan 19, 2004 · Charles I of Austria and Charles IV of Hungary, the last emperor who ascended to the Habsburg throne in the middle of the first world war in 1916 and died in exile on Madeira six years later at the...

  9. Charles I Of Austria Photos and Premium High Res Pictures ...

    www.gettyimages.com › photos › charles-i-of-austria

    Charles I of Austria, *1887-1922+, Emperor of Austria, King of Hungary and King of Bohemia from 1916 to 1918 - Charles with his son, Crown Prince... Emperor Karl Franz Josef of Austria with Empress Zita of Austria .

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