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  1. Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg (19 April 1795 – 27 June 1876) was a German naturalist, zoologist, comparative anatomist, geologist, and microscopist. Ehrenberg was an evangelist [2] and was considered to be of the most famous and productive scientists of his time. Contents 1 Early collections 2 Focus on microscopic organisms 3 Legacy 4 Family

    Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_Gottfried_Ehrenberg
  2. Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg (19 April 1795 – 27 June 1876) was a German naturalist, zoologist, comparative anatomist, geologist, and microscopist. Ehrenberg was an evangelist [2] and was considered to be of the most famous and productive scientists of his time. Contents 1 Early collections 2 Focus on microscopic organisms 3 Legacy 4 Family

    • University of Berlin
    • naturalist
  3. Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg, (born April 19, 1795, Delitzsch, Saxony [Germany]—died June 27, 1876, Berlin, Germany), German biologist, microscopist, scientific explorer, and a founder of micropaleontology —the study of fossil microorganisms.

    • The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
    • Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg – Early Years
    • Unicellular Organisms
    • Diatoms
    • Later Years, Honors, and Legacy

    Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg studied theology at the University of Leipzig. Later on, he continued his education in Berlin to study medicine and natural sciences. Ehrenberg also befriended the famous explorer Alexander von Humboldt.[4] In 1818, Ehrenberg completed his doctoral dissertation on fungi, Sylvae mycologicae Berolinenses. At the Universi...

    Ehrenberg was particularly interested in unicellular organisms. In contrast to his opponent Félix Dujardin , he mistakenly assumed that unicellular organisms had the same organs as the higher (multicellular) organisms. Felix Dujardin spoke here in 1835 of sarcodes a term which was later replaced by the botanist Hugo von Mohlwith protoplasm for the ...

    In particular, Ehrenberg was enthusiastic about a unicellular group of protists called diatoms, but he also studied, and named, many species of radiolaria, foraminifera and dinoflagellates. The studied of Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg highly contributed to today’s knowledge on microorganisms of certain geological formations, especially of the chalk...

    Ehrenberg had also discovered the infusoria in Berlin and noticed that “a large part of the ground on which Berlin stands is made up of these tiny hard-shelled animals”. In the city, many people were worried that the “little animals would even crawl away with the houses” because of structural damage to many houses. Ehrenberg consoled: “they do that...

  4. Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg 1795-1876 German biologist who discovered microorganisms in fossils. Ehrenberg discovered microscopic fossil organisms in different geologic formations, in the process founding the field of micropaleontology. He demonstrated that fungi come from spores and showed that mushrooms and molds reproduce sexually.

  5. Ehrenberg, Christian Gottfried ( b. Delitzsch, near Leipzig, Germany, 19 April 1795; d. Berlin, Germany, 27 June 1876) biology, micropaleontology. Ehrenberg’s father, Johann Gottfried Ehrenberg, was a municipal magistrate in the small city of Delitzsch; his mother, Christiane Dorothea Becker, was the daughter of an innkeeper.

  6. Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg is the 185th most popular biologist (down from 89th in 2019), the 1,634th most popular biography from Germany (down from 853rd in 2019) and the 24th most popular Biologist. Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg is most famous for his discovery of the bacteria that causes cholera. Memorability Metrics 110k Page Views (PV) 57.30

  7. CHRISTIAN GOTTFRIED EHRENBERG (179J-1876), German naturalist, was born at Delitzsch in Saxony on the 19th of April 1795. After studying at Leipzig and Berlin, where he took the degree of doctor of medicine in 1818, he was appointed professor of medicine in the university of Berlin (1827).

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